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Good Friday. Christians have it wrong.

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posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 03:51 PM
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In many countries across the world, The Crucifixion of Yehoshua (Jesus) is celebrated, known as Good Friday or Holy Friday.
Two days later, Sunday, some Christians celebrate the day Yehoshua was Resurrected as the Messiah.

But looking closely, you will find that that is only TWO days, not three, as the Christians believe it was. So who does this work?

Here is the answer. Yehoshua died the day before Preparation day. In Jewish culture this is the day before Sabbath in the Passover week. On that day, (Preparation day), you are also not allowed to do any work, or touch a dead body. That is why the people were in a hurry to get His body of the cross before sunset. (Note: A day is from 6pm to 6pm). And the Sabbath is Saturday, for 6pm to 6pm.

"And on the first day of the week, at early dawn, they came to the tomb ... and having entered, they did not find the body of the Master Yehoshua" (Luke 24:1-2)

Now we need to look at this 2 verses in detail.

"And on the first day of the week..." - This is Sunday, because the Sabbath, Saturday is the seventh day.
"...at early dawn..." - This is almost 9 hours into Sunday.

This makes it clear that the Resurrection did in fact take place on Sunday.

But when was the Crucifixion then? Not on Friday, but on Thursday, the day before Preparation day which was the Friday.

"And taking it down, he wrapped it in linen, and laid it in a tomb hewn out of the rock, where no one was yet laid.
And it was Preparation day, and the Sabbath was approaching." Luke 23:53-54


So in conclusion, the vast majority of Christians is celebrating the wrong day, and actually shows how little they know regarding their own belief.
edit on 4-12-2014 by IndependentAgent because: (no reason given)

edit on 4-12-2014 by IndependentAgent because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 04:00 PM
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edit on 4-12-2014 by IndependentAgent because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 04:02 PM
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a reply to: IndependentAgent
Christian scholars have sometimes challenged the traditional day as well.
I have a "Study of the Gospels" by Bishop Westcott (1881) which argues the possibility of Thursday for similar but slightly different reasons.
He points out that there were two kinds of Sabbath. Apart from the normal weekly Sabbath, the Passover had its own Sabbath immediately following the sacrifice of the Lamb.
This makes possible the timetable;
Thursday afternoon, Lamb killed, Christ crucified.
Thursday sunset, Passover Sabbath begins (so Jesus must be buried before it starts)
Friday sunset. Weekly Sabbath begins.
Similar result, different route.



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

As for as I understand, the Passover Sabbath may be the Preparation day.

But that, in a way, begs the question of why that truth has not made his way into churches? Does the Scholars not see this as important knowledge?
edit on 4-12-2014 by IndependentAgent because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 04:13 PM
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Who really cares anyway, it makes a nice long weekend. If it was on Thursday, you would have to go back to work for Friday.

Wednesday is Odin's/Woden's day, Thursday is Thor's day. You can't be having the wrong gods on the wrong day.


Oh oh, my horns might be showing.



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 04:14 PM
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a reply to: IndependentAgent
Westcott points out that the word "Preparation" had become the common word for the day before the weekly Sabbath (that is, Friday).
This sets up the possibility that the gospel account says "Preparation" (meaning the day before the Festival Sabbath), and the early Christians, being Gentiles and therefore vague about the difference, misunderstood this as "Friday", the more familiar meaning.
And that is how the death of Christ came to be understood as Friday.




edit on 4-12-2014 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 04:41 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

That might be true, but we are living over 2,000 years after the Crucifixion.



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 04:49 PM
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a reply to: IndependentAgent

As the Op quotes,

"And taking it down, he wrapped it in linen, and laid it in a tomb hewn out of the rock, where no one was yet laid.
And it was Preparation day, and the Sabbath was approaching".

It WAS Preparation day when Joseph of Arimethea took Christ's body. It was the same day that Jesus died.

It still works as 3 days; Christ died on the Friday before sundown (Friday, 1st day), the Sabbath (Saturday, 2nd day) and First day of the week (Sunday, 3rd day). He rose on the 3rd day.

Christ likened it to the sign of Jonah; 3 days in the belly of the whale, metaphorically in Sheol.

I studied this before and that is the conclusion I came to. It does not have to be exactly three periods of 24 hours, lol.

But please if you feel differently I accept that. It is just the conclusion I reached to my own satisfaction.


edit on 4-12-2014 by lonesomerimbaud because: spelling.



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 05:09 PM
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originally posted by: lonesomerimbaud
a reply to: IndependentAgent

As the Op quotes,

"And taking it down, he wrapped it in linen, and laid it in a tomb hewn out of the rock, where no one was yet laid.
And it was Preparation day, and the Sabbath was approaching".

It WAS Preparation day when Joseph of Arimethea took Christ's body. It was the same day that Jesus died.

It still works as 3 days; Christ died on the Friday before sundown (Friday, 1st day), the Sabbath (Saturday, 2nd day) and First day of the week (Sunday, 3rd day). He rose on the 3rd day.

Christ likened it to the sign of Jonah; 3 days in the belly of the whale, metaphorically in Sheol.

I studied this before and that is the conclusion I came to. It does not have to be exactly three periods of 24 hours, lol.

But please if you feel differently I accept that. It is just the conclusion I reached to my own satisfaction.



He died 3pm, giving Joseph 3 hours to go ask permission form Pilate, retrieve the body, and take it to his tomb. Preparation Day began 6pm, 3 hours after His death. It is very possible that he had just finished placing His body in the tomb before sunset . That would explain why the woman could not add the ointments to His body



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 05:35 PM
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originally posted by: lonesomerimbaud
a reply to: IndependentAgent

As the Op quotes,

"And taking it down, he wrapped it in linen, and laid it in a tomb hewn out of the rock, where no one was yet laid.
And it was Preparation day, and the Sabbath was approaching".

It WAS Preparation day when Joseph of Arimethea took Christ's body. It was the same day that Jesus died.

It still works as 3 days; Christ died on the Friday before sundown (Friday, 1st day), the Sabbath (Saturday, 2nd day) and First day of the week (Sunday, 3rd day). He rose on the 3rd day.

Christ likened it to the sign of Jonah; 3 days in the belly of the whale, metaphorically in Sheol.

I studied this before and that is the conclusion I came to. It does not have to be exactly three periods of 24 hours, lol.

But please if you feel differently I accept that. It is just the conclusion I reached to my own satisfaction.



In order for the full three days and three nights in the tomb Christ coul;d not of been crusified on friday.



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 05:42 PM
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a reply to: IndependentAgent
Conversely, we could be looking at the wrong days of the week altogether.

If we look at year 30 CE/AD, the 14th of Nisan (day of the crucifixion/sacrificial lamb) occurs on Wednesday, as you can confirm here (Otherwise, the only generally-accepted year for these events with passover/crucifixion on Friday would have been 33 CE/AD). The first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread (Nisan 15) is a high Sabbath, so Nisan 14 Wednesday would also have been a preparation day.

This would have allowed for Christ to be interred Nisan 14/Wednesday, have rested in the tomb for 3 full days and 3 full nights, and arisen Sabbath/Saturday Nisan 17 afternoon, and for the tomb to have been found empty the following morning.

This is the view I have long held as jewish idioms generally suggest 3 days and 3 nights referring to the roughly 72 hour period, as compared to parts of 3 days.

Also, this squares with some interesting information sourced from the Babylonian Talmud as well (neat breakdown/additional details in the link!) indicating possible supposed indicators of Supreme judgement against the nation Israel starting in year 30 CE/AD, culminating in the destruction of the Temple:

"Our rabbis taught: During the last forty years before the destruction of the Temple the lot ['For the Lord'] did not come up in the right hand; nor did the crimson-colored strap become white; nor did the western most light shine; and the doors of the Hekel [Temple] would open by themselves" (Soncino version, Yoma 39b).


Thanks to the following poster for helping me realize I'd erred in my post originally!
edit on 12/4/2014 by Praetorius because: I'm an idiot sometimes



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 05:51 PM
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a reply to: Praetorius
Thank you for that interesting information.
In your link, the calendar is described as belonging to "Year of Creation 31".
Is this, then, equivalent to 31 A.D.?



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 05:54 PM
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originally posted by: DISRAELI
a reply to: Praetorius
Thank you for that interesting information.
In your link, the calendar is described as belonging to "Year of Creation 31".
Is this, then, equivalent to 31 A.D.?


*facepalm*

Thank you! I was wondering why it wasn't lining up with what I was going to edit in to my post. Here's the link to the first page for the calendar and I failed to put a + in front of the year, so I was going back to the beginning of the hebrew calendar, not the time of Christ.

Correcting post now, thanks!



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 05:57 PM
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originally posted by: Praetorius
a reply to: IndependentAgent
Conversely, we could be looking at the wrong days of the week altogether.

If we look at year 31 CE/AD, the 14th of Nisan (day of the crucifixion/sacrificial lamb) occurs on Wednesday, as you can confirm here. The first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread (Nisan 15) is a high Sabbath, so Nisan 14 Wednesday would also have been a preparation day.

This would have allowed for Christ to be interred Nisan 14/Wednesday, have rested in the tomb for 3 full days and 3 full nights, and arisen Sabbath/Saturday Nisan 17 afternoon, and for the tomb to have been found empty the following morning.

This is the view I have long held as jewish idioms generally suggest 3 days and 3 nights referring to the roughly 72 hour period, as compared to parts of 3 days.



I may be wrong but wasn’t the Sabbath moved from Saturday to Sunday by Constantine so as to forever distance the new religion from Judaism’s observance of Saturday Sabbath.



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 06:00 PM
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originally posted by: guitarplayer

originally posted by: Praetorius
a reply to: IndependentAgent
Conversely, we could be looking at the wrong days of the week altogether.

If we look at year 31 CE/AD, the 14th of Nisan (day of the crucifixion/sacrificial lamb) occurs on Wednesday, as you can confirm here. The first day of the Feast of Unleavened Bread (Nisan 15) is a high Sabbath, so Nisan 14 Wednesday would also have been a preparation day.

This would have allowed for Christ to be interred Nisan 14/Wednesday, have rested in the tomb for 3 full days and 3 full nights, and arisen Sabbath/Saturday Nisan 17 afternoon, and for the tomb to have been found empty the following morning.

This is the view I have long held as jewish idioms generally suggest 3 days and 3 nights referring to the roughly 72 hour period, as compared to parts of 3 days.



I may be wrong but wasn’t the Sabbath moved from Saturday to Sunday by Constantine so as to forever distance the new religion from Judaism’s observance of Saturday Sabbath.

Kind of yes, kind of no.

The catholic church did, after the first few centuries, take an active role in shifting the christian day of worship (and indeed all things christian) away from any sort of jewish tradition, regardless if that exact tradition is what was followed by Christ and the apostles and the earliest church for centuries.

There was a large anti-judaic vibe at the time, sadly, which helped christianity lose its roots and some of its best examples.

A good many catholic authors, popes, and who all else have actively address the authority of the Church itself (and no word or leading by God or the bible otherwise) in moving away from these founding traditions.

I think it came after Constantine though, IIRC.



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 06:01 PM
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a reply to: Praetorius
To be honest, I was just being puzzled about why a Jewish calendar should be calling Christian era years "Year of Creation".
I'm not familiar with this area of information at all, so I wouldn't know whether you were getting it right or wrong.
But if you do have to amend what you originally posted, does that affect which Christian era year has the relevant date on a Wednesday?



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 06:02 PM
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a reply to: IndependentAgent



But looking closely, you will find that that is only TWO days, not three, as the Christians believe it was. So who does this work?


If you have ever paid for a 3-day cruise this whole thing would make perfect sense.



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 06:06 PM
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a reply to: DISRAELI
Absolutely. I was a few thousand years off there, so should have been referring to year 30 AD, not 31...totally different fall for the months with different days of the weeks.



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 06:10 PM
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a reply to: Praetorius
Well, 30 is still within plausible time-range.
More than thirty years since probable date of birth.



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 06:21 PM
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Encyclopedia Britannica under the article, Sunday. Notice: “It was Constantine who first made a law for the proper observance of Sunday and who appointed that it should be regularly celebrated throughout the Roman empire.” - See more at: www.sabbathtruth.com...
a reply to: Praetorius



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