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BREAKING: No Charges in Eric Garner Chokehold Case for Officer

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posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 07:55 PM
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a reply to: TiedDestructor

I wasn't specifically attacking you it was more a comment that every time one of these incidents happen the criminal history is dragged up and an attempt to dismiss the victim as nothing other than a criminal that deserved to die anyway because they weren't model citizens is made; and as a general rule they aren't model citizens, they are involved in various crimes and misdemeanours but in so far as I knew capital punishment is the perogative of judge and jury...not the police
edit on 3-12-2014 by khnum because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 07:57 PM
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originally posted by: thrustbucket
Touche. You can use whichever words you like. Just keep in mind that some words one chooses to use amplifies or diminishes one's credibility.


I'm well aware of how words affect others perception of me and my credibility. Though this discussion isn't about me or my credibility. It's about a lack of liability yet another police officer is awarded for killing a civilian.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 07:58 PM
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a reply to: chrismarco
The officer applied a chokehold. Illegal for NYC cops. The death was ruled a homicide by the M.E due to choking. The entire encounter was filmed and all can view. Illegally selling cigs? Whatever. Men with guns and badges are dangerous to our rights. They live and are payed by us to serve and protect us. All of us. People of color, people of gender difference, people of peace...It's the last of their consideration. All responsibility should lie on the police officer for the way he reacted to a benign crime. Positional asphyxia is a lame excuse for what occurred. Overweight, obese, malnourished, different, not normal, wearing a hoodee...let the excuses flow. The police in this nation need to take a class on what it means to protect and serve and who and what that means rather than positional asphyxia.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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originally posted by: FraggleRock

originally posted by: thrustbucket
Touche. You can use whichever words you like. Just keep in mind that some words one chooses to use amplifies or diminishes one's credibility.


I'm well aware of how words affect others perception of me and my credibility. Though this discussion isn't about me or my credibility. It's about a lack of liability yet another police officer is awarded for killing a civilian.


I'm really curious to hear how he's been "rewarded" in a city full of people that want him hurt or dead.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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originally posted by: thrustbucket

originally posted by: boymonkey74
a reply to: thrustbucket

Do what I do everyday at work.

Restrain but not harm.



And in doing that, when someone ends up dead, I won't try to claim you meant it or should go to jail for it.


Like I have said If Iam seen doing a wrong hold or I hurt someone in my care I get charged with assault.
If I restrained someone and I caused them to die because I did it wrong I would accept a manslaughter charge.
We don't use pain compliance techniques because the techniques we use work just as well (If not better) to restrain someone.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:00 PM
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a reply to: JacKatMtn

They are referred to as less than lethal. They bridge a gap between shooting someone and going hands on or smacking them with a baton. I would hazard a guess that more people die annually from being restrained or falling to the ground being tackled than by tazer. The people that die are usually very compromised too. It wouldn't surprise me if instead of being killed by a tazer, they would have had a heart attack or whatever from any physical confrontation.

Now that being said I do think that they have become a crutch and their use needs to be revisited somewhat. I've seen many "lazy tazings" that could have gone another way.

Tazers are a very important tool, and when used correctly greatly reduce injury or the chance of injury for everyone involved. No they are not always used appropriately. Neither are batons, or guns, or fists, or pepper spray or really anything else.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:02 PM
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a reply to: thrustbucket

Sure, because he won't be well taken care of. You would think if prison was such a better option for him he would have begged the grand jury to indict him.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:05 PM
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This is a disgraceful outcome... & even more so heartbreaking...


Some of you are delusional.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:05 PM
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I feel very sorry for Eric Garner and the way he died, as well as for his loved ones living with the pain of his death. The fact of the matter is that excessive force was used when it was unnecessary, and if this were an ordinary citizen he would have been charged with manslaughter at the least.

Nevertheless, I disagree that this was racially-motivated. It was more likely that the victim had an intimidating appearance (tall, large and strong) that made him the target of needing to be subdued.

At the end of the day, this was a preventable unjust death and a precedent should have been set that using such force when the situation didn't warrant it is unacceptable police procedure.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:06 PM
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originally posted by: trumpet
a reply to: chrismarco
The officer applied a chokehold. Illegal for NYC cops. The death was ruled a homicide by the M.E due to choking. The entire encounter was filmed and all can view. Illegally selling cigs? Whatever. Men with guns and badges are dangerous to our rights. They live and are payed by us to serve and protect us. All of us. People of color, people of gender difference, people of peace...It's the last of their consideration. All responsibility should lie on the police officer for the way he reacted to a benign crime. Positional asphyxia is a lame excuse for what occurred. Overweight, obese, malnourished, different, not normal, wearing a hoodee...let the excuses flow. The police in this nation need to take a class on what it means to protect and serve and who and what that means rather than positional asphyxia.



Things about this case that interest me even more, that get little attention:

1) The bull# taxes on cigarettes (or anything) that creates a black market, which in turn, creates bull# crimes and criminals.

2) Police quotas. They exist. They are a problem. They don't like to use the word "quota" but they will dress it up with other fancy words like "performance metrics" that ultimately mean quotas. Funding depends on them - so there is a huge amount of pressure put on cops to fill them. Then see number 1 again.

3) NYC is a place where you get punished more for selling loose cigarettes than marijuana. Regardless of your feelings on marijuana, it's still illegal. Cigarettes aren't.

NYC is a microcosm of what's going wrong with this countries justice system. Sure, there are bad untrained cops out there. Maybe even lots of them, but we are a nation that loves to have laws for the sake of having laws. Cops are expected to uphold those laws, no matter how numerous and silly they get. This is ultimately why Eric died. I sure wish more people could see the big picture here.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

Seriously when an officer does something they have to really, i mean really be blatant about their murder, if you want them to get convicted for it. But the best way is for the family through a lawyer to sue the department, and the officer for civil rights violations or something else and stick it to them in the way they really understand the checkbook. It sucks that it is this way.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:07 PM
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No matter how I look at this case, no matter what side I see one being on, one constant I think everyone should heed is that it just doesn't make sense to resist arrest. Just do what the dang cops say. Fight it out in court and let them decide.

No cop has ever stopped an arrest because someone said NO. In fact it makes them more angry.

So bite the bullet and just take the cuffs because ending up dead over something LAME like this is not worth it.
edit on 3-12-2014 by BatheInTheFountain because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:07 PM
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originally posted by: FraggleRock
a reply to: thrustbucket

Sure, because he won't be well taken care of. You would think if prison was such a better option for him he would have begged the grand jury to indict him.


He'll be well taken care of? By who? Where will he work now? Where will he live without fear of his life or his families life? Do you think he'll have a secret service detail the rest of his life? Who will hire him?



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:08 PM
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Eric Holder says the JD will make a complete review !!




posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:09 PM
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Judge Andrew Napolitano Says Eric Garner's Death Was 'Criminally Negligent Homicide'



Judge Andrew Napolitano, the senior judicial analyst for Fox News, said Wednesday that he was shocked by a grand jury's decision not to indict a New York City police officer in the chokehold death of Eric Garner, describing Garner's death as "criminally negligent homicide."




"I think it is clearly a case for criminally negligent homicide," Napolitano said during a Wednesday segment of "The Hugh Hewitt Show."




"This is not Ferguson, Missouri," Napolitano continued. "This is not somebody wrestling for your gun, this is not where you shoot or be shot at. This is choking to death a mentally impaired, grossly obese person whose only crime was selling cigarettes without collecting taxes on them. This does not call for deadly force by any stretch of the imagination." (It was not clear why Napolitano described Garner as "mentally impaired.")




Napolitano said he was taken aback by the grand jury's decision, which was made public on Wednesday. He added that the decision suggests Staten Island District Attorney Daniel Donovan never wanted an indictment to happen.


This was a no-brainer. The police state establishment takes care of their own.

Particularly, a black person, murdered by a cop will never get justice in America even WITH A VIDEO TAPE.

Even many conservatives decry this murder...indeed even on Fox news this was condemned



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:10 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

I see what you are saying, but I still find it troubling that the LEO's are now having to make more justified response decisions in what most of us would consider to be a "fight or flight" scenario..

Above^^ not necessarily related to this thread topic, but something that may need to be addressed by the LE community to alleviate policy pressures? I don't know, I just want everyone to take a collective breath, reassess the situation, and move towards a solution that brings us closer together, not divide us into camps foaming at the mouth...

YMMV



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:10 PM
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originally posted by: xuenchen
Eric Holder says the JD will make a complete review !!



It's a good thing Eric Garner was black, or Holder would care less.
edit on 3-12-2014 by thrustbucket because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:13 PM
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originally posted by: khnum
a reply to: TiedDestructor

I wasn't specifically attacking you it was more a comment that every time one of these incidents happen the criminal history is dragged up and an attempt to dismiss the victim as nothing other than a criminal that deserved to die anyway because they weren't model citizens is made; and as a general rule they aren't model citizens, they are involved in various crimes and misdemeanours but in so far as I knew capital punishment is the perogative of judge and jury...not the police


I understand I meant no ill intent to you.

I, in case you don't know, I have had my share of involvement with law enforcement. I ran for years, with a state warrant on me, for some trumped up charges that were in end wiped off my record.

At aged 19 I was beaten badly with nightsticks after not "complying" with officers who were searching "my persons". This was after a traffic stop in which I was the passenger. After being in the CRMC intensive care unit
for 3 days my family lawyered up, took on the city and won.

I do not CONDONE this behavior by police and I detest the suggestion that ANY criminal other than a murderer to be deserving of a deadly outcome such as this.

That was not my point. I was a hard headed lawless sob back in my day. And while my family supported me after my ass whooping by Leo I was still chewed hard about living the lifestyle that put me into continual involvement with law enforcement.

These days you can't risk even a casual encounter with Leo as it may very well be your last. And for that reason I feel for Eric and his family. And all those before him who payed the unnecessary cost of their life at the hand of the enforcers.

It's a bit hard to project your true feelings on a thread that moves so quickly so my apologies for the misunderstanding. Murder is murder...



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:14 PM
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LEO spokespeople keep saying that they have every right to use every means necessary to take someone into custody once that decision is made, up to and including deadly force.

That just seems ripe for abuse or misuse or something. Why should LEO be able to use any means necessary to apprehend certain types of non-violent, mostly victimless "criminals", like selling loose cigarettes (Garner) or routine traffic stops? And I'm thinking of that guy in SC who was shot following a stop for seat belt violation when he simply reached into his car for his wallet.

Why should LEO have that level of impunity? How does it serve society if those "suspects" were never a danger to society in the first place?
edit on 12/3/2014 by kosmicjack because: (no reason given)




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