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ORION Flight Test - Launch 12/04/14

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posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 07:31 AM
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Let's hope this launch goes better than the last launch ...

NASA TV starts Orion coverage today with briefings and information about the mission. It will then be broadcast live on NASA TV in the morning. Launch is scheduled for 7:05 am Thursday AM.

ORION Launch

Managers from United Launch Alliance (ULA) and Lockheed Martin gave a “go” to proceed toward launch pending completion of open work during the Launch Readiness Review for Orion’s flight test. The weather is forecast to be 60 percent “go” for a scheduled liftoff at 7:05 a.m. EST on Thursday, Dec. 4.

NASA TV will air an Orion Flight Test Status and Overview briefing at 1 p.m. today. On Dec. 3, a prelaunch status briefing will be held at 11 a.m. A NASA overview event with participation from social media followers will air at 1 p.m.


What is Orion?

he Orion spacecraft will take crews farther from Earth than any human-rated spacecraft since Apollo. The first step of that adventure comes this week when the Orion flight test sends an uncrewed version of the capsule about 3,600 miles above Earth – far enough to encounter the high radiation zones that circle the planet and measure their effects on the inside of the spacecraft. On its way back home, Orion’s heat shield will bear the brunt of scorching plasma as the spacecraft dives into the atmosphere at 20,000 mph before slowing for splashdown.

It’s a stress test for more than the spacecraft, of course – people from NASA and Lockheed Martin along with scores of others involved in the program will watch every readout carefully. No matter what happens, the flight test has already made strides in development of America’s next deep-space vehicle for astronauts.


Live coverage of the launch can be found here along with shows about the Orion mission -
NASA TV
edit on 12/3/2014 by FlyersFan because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:07 AM
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People on Wallops Island will be disappointed.

The launch is from Cape Canaveral, Florida.

Big oops.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:24 AM
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a reply to: JimOberg
Yep. My brain fart. Shouldn't have put Wallops there. I live near it and am used to saying that instead of Cape Canaveral. Anyways, the launch will be at 7:05 AM Thursday. For anyone interested.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 09:17 AM
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I've been looking forward to this test since Orion was announced YEARS ago!

I'm excited to see that beautiful Delta-IV lift off, I have a feeling I may catch a glimpse of it from Tallahassee if the weather cooperates.

Go NASA!



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 09:20 AM
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I am very excited about this and what it means for future human exploration.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 09:36 AM
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will be watching also ... their will be mishaps at some point but lets hope it keeps to a minimum and we can get to mars soon



Q



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 09:38 AM
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Will be watching, thanks for the link to the feed and for the alert that this is occurring. To infinity......and beyond!



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 09:55 AM
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BA...thanks for the notification....I will try and get some video of it and get it posted.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 10:29 AM
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Here is an animation showing a what this first flight test ("Exploration Flight Test 1" -- or EFT-1) entails, in a nutshell.

After two orbits -- one being a low orbit, similar to the orbit of the space station, and the other being a relatively high 3600 mile altitude orbit -- the spacecraft will reenter and splash down. The reason for the higher second orbit is to get close to the maximum reentry velocities that Orion will encounter when fully operational.

It then splashes down off the Pacific coast of Mexico, and it will be towed into the well deck of a recovery ship (a well deck being a flooded deck open to the ocean).



edit on 12/3/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 11:12 AM
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Could this be another precursor event?

www.thekillshot.com...

5. Celestial event/object downs orbiting craft (future event); I hope this is not it, because North Korea hasn't used a Nuke in Anger yet.

Just my two cheap cents!



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 11:18 AM
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originally posted by: Promagstyle

Could this be another precursor event?

www.thekillshot.com...

5. Celestial event/object downs orbiting craft (future event); I hope this is not it, because North Korea hasn't used a Nuke in Anger yet.

Just my two cheap cents!

This flight test has been planned for a few years now (even the approximate date for the test has been scheduled a couple of years ago), so I'm not sure how it could be any sort of event specifically meant to be a precursor to anything involving North Korea.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 01:52 PM
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I'll be watching it live, just might have to set an alarm. Right now the weather is almost perfect for a launch and should be good tomorrow morning.

Here is a good graphic of the planned orbits:
blogs.nasa.gov...



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 02:54 PM
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originally posted by: FlyersFan
a reply to: JimOberg
Yep. My brain fart. Shouldn't have put Wallops there. I live near it and am used to saying that instead of Cape Canaveral. Anyways, the launch will be at 7:05 AM Thursday. For anyone interested.


You've nowhere near hit the level of public brain farts on my record! I hope the chiding was taken as gently as it was offered.

Space Center Houston offers a free public big-screen viewing on launch morning, I expect crowds, you need to pre-register on line.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 02:56 PM
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Anybody in southern Arizona ought to see it pass to the south pre-dawn, if liftoff is on time, add an hour and a half for first orbit.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: JimOberg

Jim --

I thought your colleague Jay Barbree asked a "fun" question at that press conference. He asked if there was any chance that the next test flight (EM-1) -- which is designed to be an unmanned "all up" test that will go around the Moon and return home -- could possibly instead be manned.

The NASA manager who answered the question said no, because it would be the first "all up" test. Maybe I misunderstood Mr. Barbree, but Barbree seemed to indicate that Apollo 8 was the first all up test of Apollo, and it was manned, and so was STS 1, which was manned (although the space shuttle in 1981 needed pilots; I'm not sure about the 2010 versions) -- so why not do the same with Orion/SLS?

Although I'm not sure that Apollo 8 was the "first" all-up test of the Apollo systems. Wasn't Apollo 4 (which was unmanned) and "all-up" test? I realize that Apollo 4 was missing the actual LM (which was not ready, although planners hoped it would have been), but they did include a dummy LM so that the test flight would have a similar weight/weight distribution as the operational flights.

I think I'll side with the NASA manager on this one. The time between this first flight and the next one (EM-1) will be at least three years, and it seems to me that they will be making changes to the SLS/Orion between now and then. As exciting that it may be to have EM-1 be manned, I think they should get another unmanned flight under their belts before the manned ones, especially if new system or procedures are involved in the EM-1 flight.

What say you?


edit on 12/3/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 04:50 PM
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At first I was like, "Yes, yes! Nuke-riding city ships! xkcd called it!"


xkcd: Exoplanets

But then I realized it's not this Project Orion (nuclear propulsion), it's this Orion (spacecraft). Too bad, but still cool.



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 06:43 PM
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a reply to: FlyersFan

I was going to fleshout a crab piece about how far we haven't advance in the quest for space. but I won't exactly.

We went to the Moon in about five years, the last time in 1972. Then we fired up the shuttle in 1981 and used it about 130 times with the disastrous loss of two ships and crews--a sizeable amount of our ships and of the 350 people in all of the flights. Twentyeight years we spent sending the shuttle up, not counting the years in the design and testing and lofting of the deathtrap. And if we believe TPTB we are on the verge of a brand new undertaking with the Orion. --How incredible that we should rejoice that a new, bigger, better rocket is poised to again. It is all make believe for your eyes.

The simple truth is that these ancient rocketry programs are a cover for the real, on-going space race that is already won. But all of that work is deep black budget stuff, paid for with the trillions that the Pentagon lost and trillions of other dollars scrapped from programs both actual and those that never actually got into any worthwhile existence as touted. Rockets? They still want to play with rockets? Yes, they must. All of that hardware is coming from about the only industry America has left, the aerospace industry. That industry has two duties, the overt, public side and the highly covert secret side of producing the triangles, our "ace of space," (pun intended). The best damned weapon of war ever developed on earth. The only ones fooled are the simple folk, the ones that are fed the propaganda but really couldn't care less about the latest announcement from Boeing, Lockheed-Martin, Northrup and General Electric. Not that the announcements of bigger, better jets and rockets mean much to our adversaries either. After all they aren't stupid and have intensive intelligence networks that obviously must know the truth. So why don't we simply end the game of "hide-and-seek" and unveil the magical technology?

edit on 3-12-2014 by Aliensun because: word delete



posted on Dec, 3 2014 @ 08:17 PM
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originally posted by: ikonoklast
At first I was like, "Yes, yes! Nuke-riding city ships! xkcd called it!"


xkcd: Exoplanets

But then I realized it's not this Project Orion (nuclear propulsion), it's this Orion (spacecraft). Too bad, but still cool.


Particle Beam Propelled Magsail for the win...

We could begin building them tomorrow if the will and money were there.



Interstellar space contains very small amounts of hydrogen. A fast-moving sail would ionize this hydrogen by accelerating the electrons in one direction and the oppositely charged protons in the other direction. The energy for the ionization and cyclotron radiation would come from the spacecraft's kinetic energy, slowing the spacecraft. The cyclotron radiation from the acceleration of particles would be an easily detected howl in radio frequencies.

Thus, in interstellar spaceflight outside the heliopause of a star a magnetic sail could act as a parachute to decelerate a spacecraft. This removes any fuel requirements for the deceleration half of an interstellar journey, which would benefit interstellar travel enormously. The magsail was first proposed for this purpose in 1988 by Robert Zubrin and Dana Andrews, predating other uses, and evolved from a concept of the Bussard ramjet which used a magnetic scoop to collect interstellar material.

Magnetic sails could also be used with beam-powered propulsion by using a high-power particle accelerator to fire a beam of charged particles at the spacecraft.[8] The magsail would deflect this beam, transferring momentum to the vehicle. This would provide much higher acceleration than a solar sail driven by a laser, but a charged particle beam would disperse in a shorter distance than a laser due to the electrostatic repulsion of its component particles. This dispersion problem could potentially be resolved by accelerating a stream of sails which then in turn transfer their momentum to a magsail vehicle, as proposed by Jordin Kare.


Of course most intelligent people into this stuff know an interplanetary spacecraft has much different needs and capabilities than an interstellar spacecraft.

They'd be very different vehicles.

edit on 3-12-2014 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 05:39 AM
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1/2 hour until launch.



posted on Dec, 4 2014 @ 05:52 AM
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Watching live at www.ustream.tv...

A boat in the restricted area is causing a problem! I hope the launch will not be affected.




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