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Stone age axe found with wood handle

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posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: Blackmarketeer




If the axe was indeed a ritual offering, then there wasn't any need for utilitarian lashing, it was just an axe for show.


I would doubt the section that narrows would be there if it was not once wrapped with some kind of rope.




posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 01:35 PM
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originally posted by: Char-Lee
a reply to: Blackmarketeer




If the axe was indeed a ritual offering, then there wasn't any need for utilitarian lashing, it was just an axe for show.


I would doubt the section that narrows would be there if it was not once wrapped with some kind of rope.


But what practical purpose would this have?

Binding makes it a major pain to remove the head when you need to resharpen/retouch it (in the case of a knapped example), or get a nick in the blade and need to regrind the edge (in the case of a typical neolithic polished axe).

And you absolutely will have to carry out repairs on a stone axe head every now and again.

This slotted and unbound method mean that when you need to remove the blade, you just knock the back of it against a tree and it comes out. When you have finished the repair, you just place it back in the slot, whack the sharp edge against a tree and it's back in place again - no need to beat, comb and chew more sinew, wrap it around the blade, whip the loose end of the sinew under itself and wait a day for it to dry and tighten up properly.

The design really is superb as it is, no binding required. Honestly

edit on 1-12-2014 by skalla because: (no reason given)


ETA: obviously you mean the handle area, sorry for the rant, i'm getting to involved in my main love and explaining why binding the blade is not only pointless but counter-productive. The only purpose for wrapping the lower part of the haft would be for decoration thoug, and it would not provide a better grip for the hands than the wood itself

edit on 1-12-2014 by skalla because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: Hanslune

Great thread! I've learned a lot from the replies and that's what it's all about.

Following your comment about any neolithic axes in peat bogs, I've looked and haven't found much. There's one in very similar condition that was found in England's Lake District/Cumbria. Good picture here.

I posted a thread on bog bodies a few years ago and seem to remember reading that broken tools and weapons were possibly disposed in the bogs as tributes. I realise this would be speculative, but might go some way to explaining what seems to be an absence of complete axes being found there.

In looking through images of stone axes, Skalla's comments are borne out by the apparent gaps alongside the vertical axis of the hafts. I learn something everyday


ETA - There was an awesome, mind-expanding series on BBC Radio 4 called the History of the World in a 100 Objects. They were 15 minute podcasts on history-changing objects. The stone axe show is a good listen.
edit on 12.1.2014 by Kandinsky because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 02:42 PM
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a reply to: skalla




The design really is superb as it is, no binding required. Honestly

What do you think the thinned area is for?



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 03:11 PM
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a reply to: Char-Lee

See if my answer to Erik earlier in the thread answers your question, i think it should, if not pls come back... but in short, it's just an ergonomic handle. But i've made some pretty comprehensive posts in the thread, give 'em a read and they should hopefully explain it all if i've expressed myself clearly etc



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 03:29 PM
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Scientists say this is one of the earliest examples of someone deciding to “bury the hatchet.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 08:05 PM
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One way to make a axe is to take the stone and a small tree.
Split the tree and insert the stone.

Then let the tree continue to grow around the stone.
If there is a groove around the stone and the tree grows into the groove you have a very strong stone axe.

By the looks of the stone axe in the photo that was how it was made.

Loggers in north America have found trees with stone axe heads in them 10+ feet above the ground where the tree grew and was never harvested.
These were found as the log went through the saw mill and wiped out the saw blade.



posted on Dec, 2 2014 @ 10:27 AM
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Thanks to everyone for their contributions!



posted on Dec, 2 2014 @ 11:40 AM
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a reply to: Hanslune
Hey Hans
Thanks for posting that.
And thanks to skalla for the mesolithic insights.



posted on Dec, 2 2014 @ 10:23 PM
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originally posted by: punkinworks10
a reply to: Hanslune
Hey Hans
Thanks for posting that.
And thanks to skalla for the mesolithic insights.


Yep a special thanks for the great contributions from Skalla!




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