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people should'nt work on Thanksgiving or Christmas

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posted on Nov, 28 2014 @ 01:53 PM
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a reply to: American-philosopher

Even in my early 20's, working for minimum wage, I have viewed employment as an agreement between two parties where labor is exchanged for cash. Each side has its terms (which, by the way, if you make sure are documented during the interview will go a long way toward ensuring those terms are met, i.e., "I can only work x-y hours" or "i cannot work on Christmas Day"), and as long as those terms are met in most places you won't have any trouble.

In most places I have ever associated with, you aren't termed for a single call in. If you call in on a holiday, you don't get holiday pay. Which, by the logic being presented here, should be just fine. Nothing ventured, nothing earned (so to speak). So a phone call would typically result in you being "off" for the holiday.

I guess what i am saying is that if a purveyor of business hires you, and you raise no objection to working on those two days during the initial discussions, then there is little that can be complained about. But in the event that you don't want to own the oversight of not mentioning it while negotiating the terms of employment (i.e., at the point where the job is offered and you accept), then you can just resort to the old fashioned "call in". If you have been a solid employee and have no issues with absenteeism or performance, then you will survive the call in and all will end up well.




posted on Nov, 28 2014 @ 02:01 PM
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originally posted by: American-philosopher
a reply to: [post=18707843]Grovit[/post

Thats fine if its nto a special day to everyone but I think the owner the boss of the company should recognze the fact that they might have employess that want that day off for whatever reason and it shoul;d be expected that they get that day off.

whats the harm in having that day off and maybe you can just have some ME time. or write a poem.



there is no harm to the person who has the day off.
there might be harm to the company or the customer for reasons i ecplained.

as far as it being expected that they get the day off, to that i say umm, no..

pretty sure that most employers let their employees/potential employees know ahead of time, as in orientation before they ever clock in the first time if it will be expected to work on a holiday and which one.
ive never been employed anywhere that did not cover this. im sure those places exist but for the most part, im thinking there is disclosure.

if you go to orientation after being offered a job and the employer says that holiday work is expected and you cant deal with it then the obvious answer is to decline the job.
if you take the job knowing they expect people to work on a holiday, then why would you expect to have the day off?

i dont understand

its called being an adult...
you didnt have to take the job. nobody forced you...if there is anything about the job you dont like, decline the position...its all pretty straight forward.

if for some reason they are not covering this at an orientation, which i dont see happening, then use your words and ask.
again, i am not understanding the problem here



posted on Nov, 28 2014 @ 02:04 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

thats what i have been trying to say.
ive seen it over and over again that a person applies for a job, they really need or want the job so they put under availability, 'any' or open to close...

they get the job and theyre lucky and got a 9-5 and theyre on it for x amount of time and for whatever reason their shift is changed and they freak out.
all of a sudden its a major deal..

well i guess you shouldnt have put available any time huh?
under the box that says days that you cant work, put christmas.

if they still hire you then its all good.
if they dont, well that might be the reason



posted on Nov, 28 2014 @ 03:10 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

sure I get what your saying and yes I have experienced where holidays are covered during orientation/training but I also think that some of these things are a given and not everything is covered in the training manual or whatever. like little things that are common sense and respect issues. and that's basically the crux of what I am trying to say that is most cases not all cases that it should just be a given that you have those two holidays off. and if not it should propably be a point of emphasis in the interview process.



posted on Nov, 28 2014 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: Grovit

well I think it is a normal thing to put available all across the board on an application. your trying to get hired and want to stand out with the employer and not thinking about having the holidays off.



posted on Nov, 28 2014 @ 03:22 PM
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originally posted by: American-philosopher
a reply to: Grovit

well I think it is a normal thing to put available all across the board on an application. your trying to get hired and want to stand out with the employer and not thinking about having the holidays off.



i think it is normal to only put the hours you actually are available to work
i think it is normal for an employer to expect their employee to work the holiday of their application said they can work any days and any availability as well as accepting the job knowing holiday work is expected.

seems like you just get bunged up about having to work the holiday....
nobody made you accept a job with an employer that expects their employees to work the holiday.
be an adult my friend

as far as if it is not covered in an orientation, i suggest you use your words and ask...
if you are about to take a job and you have a question about something or are not sure about something, its on you to ask. if you dont, thats your problem.

i know when iam interviewed, i ask all sorts of questions...

my brother seems like your type. asks nothing.
will take a job not knowing what shift he will be on or how much it even pays.

i know as much as possible before i accept.
i want to know what i am getting paid, what # i am on, when pay day is, is it direct deposit only, and yes, do we work on the holidays...

i think if you work for a company and you dont know if youre expected to work the holiday, thats your problem, not theirs.
hey, you can always quit.
you can call off.

i know at the foundry you have to have called off x amount of times before being terminated. the exception is during the holidays. if youre scheduled to work and you call off, youre done as they are already short handed and will have a hard time finding someone to fill your sport.

thats in the hand book too



posted on Nov, 28 2014 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: Grovit

AN FYI I actually had the holiday off. I am just saying I believe all people should have the day off if they want it.



posted on Nov, 28 2014 @ 06:20 PM
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originally posted by: American-philosopher
a reply to: Grovit

AN FYI I actually had the holiday off. I am just saying I believe all people should have the day off if they want it.



fair enough
i am of the opinion that if someone wants a holiday off work they shouldnt accept a job where they are expected to work the holiday



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 09:15 AM
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originally posted by: American-philosopher
a reply to: SlapMonkey
and wait you can't continuously pay your bills on holiday pay. I don't think you can can you. theres only like 4 or 5 holidays that you actually can get holiday pay for right.



*sigh* I'm quite certain that you misunderstood what I was saying. My point is that some fixed incomes can't afford to NOT WORK on a holiday, just because some people have the luxury to think that they shouldn't. They NEED that day of work. My point about the holiday pay was that it allows them a little extra left over--call it a perk for working a day that you had to work anyhow in order to make ends meet.

Why do you seem to confrontational and defensive over this subject? My comment still stands--you have over-simplified the situation for many Americans.



posted on Dec, 1 2014 @ 10:06 AM
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a reply to: American-philosopher

Caveat Emptor

That used to mean something. I wonder if it is even taught in high school history class anymore?



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