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The Idealism of Hate

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posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 02:09 PM
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The Idealism of Hate



Gender, race, religion are contentious issues within the hive mind of human networking at the moment, with the conversation reaching critical mass in a pile of hashtags and opinions. Feminists want rights for women, men’s rights groups want rights for men, justice for those of this race killed by those of that race, and what have you. In my opinion, this “discussion” is an obscenity, which merely serves to assume an individuals worth before it can be proven. What’s worse, it is not a discussion at all, but a breeding ground of hate.

In the gender debate for instance, what is rarely discussed is actual gender, that being the biological, hormonal, natural differences between the two, where the focus is usually on the psychology or behavior of purely logical entities and mental constructs a priori and independent of facts—Plato’s forms—namely, “man” and “woman”. The ideas regarding “man” and “woman”, as soon as we leave out biology, are purely mental constructions insofar as we are left to imagine and generalize “men” and “women” rather than experience them. It would be impossible to meet every instance of each gender, and we must therefor refer to the limited experience of men and women we actually do have. Within this discussion, biology, the concrete man and the concrete woman, the individual, or in philosophical terms, the particular, is rarely touched upon, and this discussion on “gender” is really a discussion on preconceived societal roles and customs imagined in the mind—the result of confusing abstract thought with concrete entities in the spirit of idealism.

I suggest that it is impossible to actually hate a biological being, a race, a gender, a religion, and that one actually hates the idea of them that he holds in his mind. What the racist hates is not a biological or material race, that being the entirety of individuals who might fall under that specific category, or a specific variation of melanin, for that would be impossible, but what he hates is the categorical race, which was conceived, devised, and implemented by himself. He does not hate the skin of other people as such, but really his own convictions about the category, the universal, the abstract platonic form, he holds on to in his imagination. He does not hate the members whom fall under a certain label, but how he attempts to generalize them. He can not hate an entire culture, but only his own reactions, experiences, and relationship with it. In other words, he hates himself.

As you might notice in current affairs, the moment idealism tries to make itself material, we are privy to the finest stupidity of the idealist philosophy—hate.

edit on 23-11-2014 by LesMisanthrope because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope

Don Quixote should be the patron saint of humankind. ;p



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope


I suggest that it is impossible to actually hate a biological being, a race, a gender, a religion, and that one actually hates the idea of them that he holds in his mind. What the racist hates is not a biological or material race, that being the entirety of individuals who might fall under that specific category, or a specific variation of melanin, for that would be impossible, but what he hates is the categorical race, which was conceived, devised, and implemented by himself. He does not hate the skin of other people as such, but really his own convictions about the category, the universal, the abstract platonic form, he holds on to in his imagination. He does not hate the members whom fall under a certain label, but how he attempts to generalize them. He can not hate an entire culture, but only his own reactions, experiences, and relationship with it. In other words, he hates himself.



so whats your solution then?

edit on 23-11-2014 by TzarChasm because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 02:25 PM
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Hate is a projection of fear, it also has it's own reward in that you get to become that which you hate. It is a fine system. I have seen it work over and over. Judgement usually screws the judge.



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: TzarChasm


so whats your solution then?


What I have tried in my own experience is to learn rather than conclude. For instance this morning I was talking to a homeless man. I could leave it at that , derive as many conclusions from that as I wish, and go about my merry way, but it wasn’t until I learned his name, his penchant for wit, and his situation, did I come to know anything about him. No longer was he just a homeless man, an instance of a specific category, but he was John, a entirely unique individual. My loose categorization, though true, did not adequately express the reality.

The difficulty here is when one sees himself as his category and goes about trying to act it out.



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: Iamschist


Hate is a projection of fear, it also has it's own reward in that you get to become that which you hate. It is a fine system. I have seen it work over and over. Judgement usually screws the judge.


I don’t hate that which I fear. As a matter of fact, I love fear, for instance extreme sports, and bears. I would argue hate is a projection of ignorance. This ignorance can lead to fear.



posted on Nov, 24 2014 @ 12:22 AM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope

There are/were many things that I "hated" about myself, however, I know/knew that I can change myself, and, eliminate the things that I "hate".

For example, I have learnt to "hate" specific emotions, calling them "pathetic" - I have attempted to isolate them, restrict them, repress them, and ultimately, destroy them.

I do also feel a sense of "self-loathing" - those that have what I would want, in my mind, often possess characteristics that I would "hate" and thus I feel proud not to be like them, yet, I feel upset that I cannot have what they have.

When it comes to race and gender, I really don't have much to "hate" about other races or the opposite sex, at least to the extent that I have derived a perception of them in my mind.



posted on Nov, 24 2014 @ 06:20 AM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope

Well said.



posted on Nov, 25 2014 @ 01:51 AM
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"He can not hate an entire culture, but only his own reactions, experiences, and relationship with it. In other words, he hates himself".

That was one of those ideas that I had to stop and mull over. It's relieving to see fresh ideas as opposed to the usual repetitions. I'm sure you are not the first to think this, but you are the first I've heard express it.

edit on 25-11-2014 by BadwolfBratton because: Typo



posted on Nov, 25 2014 @ 02:17 AM
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a reply to: LesMisanthrope

Enlighten me ol' wise one: I hate my mother, because she is ignorant, evil and self-centered.
I hated the owner of the stable my hors lived in, because she refused to read the books I gave her to back up my arguments.

So I am afraid of?

That's a nice generalisation but it doesn't work for everyone. I hate those I had bad experiences with. Individually.



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