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More murder and cover ups from our wonderful boys in blue!

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posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 08:19 PM
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While I agree with others who have commented regarding this not being police brutality, I think the bigger issue is what happened after the shooting took place. Detective Michael Yates is accused (not yet charged) with omitting key evidence. Perhaps this is the blue line in action. The first three claims made by the victims family seem to make a pretty strong case for murder charges and yet it was ruled a suicide.



He said next door neighbor Nick Glover “very specifically and with certainty” overheard Tom Fallis say to his father, “What did I do? What did I do?” and that when his father asked him what he did, Fallis replied, “I shot her.” Recht said Yates never wrote a report about the confession Glover heard and “in essence covered it up.”



Recht said another neighbor, Chelsea Arrigo, overheard Ashley Fallis yelling, “Get off me! Get off me!” and then heard a gunshot. He said she told Nick Glover’s mom to call police and tell them "Our neighbor just shot his wife." “Yet, outrageously and inexplicably, Detective Yates wrote in his report that the neighbor said, ‘Call police. The neighbor just shot herself,’” Recht said.



The attorney said the Fallis’ 6-year-old child specifically told police, “I saw Daddy get the gun ready,” and that she saw “Daddy shoot Mommy.” Recht said this information was discounted because the child said she thought she heard three gunshots when there was only one.

Source

So how is it, none of this made it into the police reports? Did Detective Yates simply take the word of his brother in blue and fail to conduct a proper investigation? Or did Detective Yates actually alter witness statements in order to help support the ruling of a suicide? And of course if there was an attempt to cover up, was Detective Yates acting on his own accord or were there others within the department involved?




posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 08:32 PM
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originally posted by: onequestion
a reply to: Shamrock6

Crappy husband and crappy father?

He killed his wife for suspecting she smoked pot and then his fellow officer covered it up for him instinctively. There's something wrong with both of these officers and it has everything to do with them being police officers.


I can understand where you're coming from but I have to disagree that the murder of his wife was a police related issue. The guy is clearly F'd in the head and if he escalated to shooting her then its a part of a long standing pattern of spousal abuse, at least that is the established pattern from a psychological stand point. It starts off small, like heated screaming matches and is easily rationalized away by family members. Soon enough its him pushing her and throwing her around before it escalates to a closed fist and trips to the ER. Is it possible and even likely that his violence and attitude demonstrated in his private life rolled into his professional work as well? I would agree that the likelihood is pretty high. However, its a bit rash to jump to conclusions on an assumption, even if that assumption is the equivalent of an educated guess. We have to remember to follow the evidence and until it is demonstrated that he engaged in police brutality while on the job, its slanderous to insist that it has to be that way.

I think that if you had painted the story from the police corruption angle you would have a lot more traction because the coverup after the fact is extraordinarily corrupt and if you or I did something like that we would be charged with 'accessory to murder after the fact' and that's exactly what they should charge the officer with who fudged the paperwork to make his buddy look less heinous that he truly is. Neither one of them would fare well locked up in a state prison and would get treated about as well as a child molester by the other inmates or they'll spend their entire sentence in isolation which is barely a step up from solitary confinement. Even then people find a way to get to them me give them a gift. But I digress... The corruption angle is certainly pertinent and tangible, a case of police brutality as opposed to an extreme and overly violent outcome of over the top spousal abuse, not so much in my opinion.



posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 08:36 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

Drug test those who oppress others over drugs? The horror. It's a total violation of their personal rights. How dare they have to give up urine or blood to pass a test and prove they're capable and competent. It's an absolute insult.

No really, it's a fantastic idea. They drug test people who want to work as dishwashers in roach-infested cafes, the cops should be tested weekly. And to be fair, so should their children. If they have pride in the laws they carry out, little junior shouldn't be excluded. Remember it's in the interest of public safety



posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 09:03 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

A little confused with the article, certainly not defending this guys actions but in the beginning the article states:


A cop forced their daughter, Ashley, down to the ground, pressed a 9mm handgun against the side of her head, and shot her to death, according to reports.


Further into the article it states:


He then immediately tried to cover up the murder by making it look like Ashley had “committed suicide.”

He “lowered Ashley to the floor, began holding her head, and called 911 to report that Ashley shot her self in the head,” the indictment states.


At least this one has been indicted by the Grand Jury and will face justice. But if the case is presented like the article he may get away with as a good lawyer could tear it all up. Hopefully this is just a bad example of poor journalistic skills and a poorly written piece and justice will prevail for this women' s children and family. Thanks for bringing another case to light.

And it will be nice to see a second indictment for the officer accused of helping to cover the murder up. Hopefully the Grand Jury will also look into this but more likely to be an internal slap on the wrist



posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 09:17 PM
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a reply to: CagliostroTheGreat

Your point is invalid and a waste of time and nothing but misleading.

He is a #ing cop. The problem is not about whether he was on duty. These are the people who are being allowed to carry weapons and enforce laws in our country.

This is an issue of police brutality as well as everything you mentioned. It's disgusting that people who have such authority in society are the people who are the most unstable.

You fail to see the depth of this problem. If he would do that to his significant other "because he can", then he belonged in prison years ago and never had any right wearing a #ing badge.

You point was meant to redirect the issue away from something that needs MORE focus...FAIL SAUCE MY FRIEND... FAIL SAUCE COMMENT.

edit on Fri Nov 21 2014 by DontTreadOnMe because: censors



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 01:38 AM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
a reply to: onequestion

Okay so a dentist kills his wife. Does that have anything to do with him being a dentist? A retail manager kills a coworker. Does that have anything to do with him being a retail manager? A stay at home mom kills her kids. Does that have anything to do with her being a stay at home mom? Or are all those examples more likely to be indicative of an underlying mental issue?

A cop killing his spouse at his own house in non duty hours is domestic violence. It has nothing to do with him being a cop. The attempted cover-up? Sure, that obviously is because they're both cops. But the "police brutality" you're piping about is domestic violence.


So the police would not link a history of work place violence and my beating my wife after i killed her?

They absolutely would, and your throwing up the blue wall proves the OPs point.

Thanks for proving all cops stick together and only us regular have to follow behavior patterns.



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 02:19 AM
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a reply to: Infinitis

Way to completely miss the point cool guy. Go have a nice cold glass of... milk. If you have read or gone over any of my recent post you would know where I stand on the issue of police brutality. My comment was not meant to do anything but point out the facts. He wasn't on duty when he killed his wife. However, I completely agree that the law enforcement profession attracts people that are likely to abuse their power. You let your anger overcome you and in so doing have achieved nothing but petty in fighting, WE ARE ON THE SAME SIDE! If you had actually read my whole comment rather than the first few words you would have known that.

For instance when I said this:

originally posted by: CagliostroTheGreat
a reply to: onequestion

Can't argue with that! I think the guy was sick before he joined the police though. The problem is, I think a job as a cop draws people with his mentality.


I am all things Anti-police brutality, my friend. Trust me we are on the same page.

Now chill the f### out.


edit on Cam2Friday2620142330Fri, 21 Nov 2014 02:26:23 -06002014 by CagliostroTheGreat because: eta



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 04:11 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

Now this is a case everyone should be rallying behind to reel in the corrupt police, instead of the race cases. This case demonstrates corruption that's been streaming through every department in the USA and the mentality that these police officers can get away with anything because their "brothers" and the code ey work by will protect them. It just helps psychos with a badge murder innocent people. This is worth a protest as passionate as ferguson, but if it doesn't include race it seems no one really cares. That's the freaking sad part of America now. If the stupid dumbed down populace isn't manipulated by the MSM en they don't give a crap about what happens. Drives me nuts. I hope this cop burns in hell and in jail.



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 06:01 AM
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a reply to: NiZZiM

Police corruption I can get behind. That's the point I've been trying to get across, and others made it better and more clearly than I did.

Tying something that one does at home to what one does for a living shouldn't be an automatic connection in my book. Is this a clear case of police corruption and coverup? Absolutely. Police misconduct? Definitely. But NOT police brutality. Domestic violence is an issue big enough on its own.



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 11:56 AM
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filmingcops.com...

OMG, read this link on that link and this was absolutely unbelievalbe, non knock raids on innocents in search for suspect. What the hell is this. All those men need to be charged and brought to justice and then whoever is behind them, giving them these instructions all the way up to the top need to be brought out and prosecuted as well. And if they don't like that, you do what is needed to protect citizens. Its the legal way or citizens start forming their own police, jails and judges and try the lot of them.



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 11:59 AM
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And this; filmingcops.com...

PROSECUTE THEM! ALL OF THEM INCLUDING ANYONE OVER THEIR HEADS.

People need to form citizens watch groups that serve and protect the neighborhood from crooked ganster rogue police.

WINNIPEG!!! A Woman at home on halloween with her little boy. WHAT THE HELL!

filmingcops.com...

So where are the concerned really pissed off, will not go away and will only get louder and louder, in each community, speaking to the police, the heads of the police, the politiicans, and firing all of them and city counsel never seeing office again until this is resolved, refusing to vote for any of the elected officials until this is resolved.


It takes THAT!
edit on 21-11-2014 by Unity_99 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 12:26 PM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
But NOT police brutality. Domestic violence is an issue big enough on its own.


Your logic escapes me....

A LEO brutalizes a family member! The issues aren't separate....It's both police brutality on a family member and domestic violence all wrapped up in one package and should be tried as such.



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 12:31 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12

originally posted by: Shamrock6
But NOT police brutality. Domestic violence is an issue big enough on its own.


Your logic escapes me....

A LEO brutalizes a family member! The issues aren't separate....It's both police brutality on a family member and domestic violence all wrapped up in one package and should be tried as such.


Blue shield.



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 12:40 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

culture? you act as if it's prevalent. There's bad seeds everywhere, even in your family. does that make you evil?

you're search for Utopia will only create more frustration.



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 12:46 PM
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It's pretty simple logic. If the point hasn't been made clear by now then I don't know how else to explain my take on it.

Off duty conduct is, by and large, off duty conduct. Whether you care for it or not, the courts have issued rulings on what PDs can and can't to after officers for when they're off duty. Getting in a fight off duty doesn't rise to the level of police brutality because it didn't happen "in the course of duty or executing the appointed office." So again, is it misconduct? Yes, and he/they can absolutely be charged for that. Is it evidence of corruption? Yep. Is it police brutality? Not as far as the court system is concerned, because he was off duty when it happened. Like it or not, it is how it is. Continuing to call it police brutality isn't going to change that.
edit on 21-11-2014 by Shamrock6 because: Because reasons



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 02:53 PM
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originally posted by: Shamrock6
Is it police brutality? Not as far as the court system is concerned, because he was off duty when it happened. Like it or not, it is how it is. Continuing to call it police brutality isn't going to change that.



Oh really? Perhaps a little investigation might be in order.




Police misconduct includes a comprehensive range, reflecting the high standards we expect of police officers. Police misconduct can apply to off-duty behavior as well as conduct on the job. Any conduct that is disgraceful, improper or unbecoming a police officer, or shows unfitness to be or continue as a police officer, or does not meet the requirements the community reasonably expects of a police officer.




www.lawteacher.net...



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

Yea, really! I can copy and paste definitions too! The key phrase in what YOU pasted is "can apply." Note they didn't say "does/always/is" or any other absolute phrase. CAN apply. Different jurisdictions define things differently than others. That's why grand larceny can be $100 and up in one state and $1,000 and up in the next.

Good job on the research though. The devil is in the details, as they say. Excuse me, as they CAN say.



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