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Commonly used soaps and toothpastes possible cause of cancer

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posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 04:41 AM
The commonly used antimicrobial additive Triclosan is a liver tumor promoter

Triclosan [5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol; TCS] is a synthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial chemical used in a wide range of consumer products including soaps, cosmetics, therapeutics, and plastics. The general population is exposed to TCS because of its prevalence in a variety of daily care products as well as through waterborne contamination. TCS is linked to a multitude of health and environmental effects, ranging from endocrine disruption and impaired muscle contraction to effects on aquatic ecosystems.

Through a long-term feeding study, we found that TCS enhances hepatocyte proliferation, fibrogenesis, and oxidative stress, which, we believe, can be the driving force for developing advanced liver disease in mice. Indeed, TCS strongly enhances hepatocarcinogenesis after diethylnitrosamine initiation, accelerating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development. Although animal studies require higher chemical concentrations than predicted for human exposure, this study demonstrates that TCS acts as a HCC tumor promoter and that the mechanism of TCS-induced mouse liver pathology may be relevant to humans.


There are already longer doubts about Triclosan, but they are still being used in products today :

Triclosan can pass through skin and is suspected of interfering with hormone function (endocrine disruption). U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention scientists detected triclosan in the urine of nearly 75 per cent of those tested (2,517 people ages six years and older). The European Union classifies triclosan as irritating to the skin and eyes, and as very toxic to aquatic organisms, noting that it may cause long-term adverse effects in the aquatic environment. Environment Canada likewise categorized triclosan as potentially toxic to aquatic organisms, bioaccumulative, and persistent. In other words, it doesn't easily degrade and can build up in the environment after it has been rinsed down the shower drain. In the environment, triclosan also reacts to form dioxins, which bioaccumulate and are toxic. The extensive use of triclosan in consumer products may contribute to antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The Canadian Medical Association has called for a ban on antibacterial consumer products, such as those containing triclosan.

Health Canada's Cosmetic Ingredient Hotlist limits the concentration of triclosan to 0.03 per cent in mouthwashes and 0.3 per cent in other cosmetics. The problem is that triclosan is used in so many products that the small amounts found in each product add up — particularly since the chemical does not readily degrade.


I don`t know if this list is complete, but here are at least some products that contain it :

Products That Contain Triclosan

EU has only limited it somewhat, but did not ban it earlier this year, so it`s still being used in products :

The European Commission has published a regulation, 35/2014, which amends Annexes II and V to Regulation (EC) No 1223/2009, covering cosmetic products.

The Scientific Committee on Consumer Products (SCCP) considered that the continued use of triclosan as a preservative at the current maximum concentration limit of 0.3 % in all cosmetic products is not safe for the consumer because of cumulative exposure effects. However, they considered that its use at a maximum concentration of 0.3 % in toothpastes, hand soaps, body soaps/shower gels and deodorants, face powders and blemish concealers is safe. In addition, the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety (SCCS) considered that other uses of triclosan – in nail products where the intended use is to clean the fingernails and toenails before the application of artificial nail systems at a maximum concentration of 0.3 % and in mouthwashes at a maximum concentration of 0.2 % are safe for the consumer.


Minnesota passed a law about the use of it, but it will come to effect at January 1, 2017. Question only is, what is going to be banned exactly ?

Gov. Mark Dayton recently signed a bill legalizing a measure banning triclosan-containing products in the state... The exceptions to this rule are individual products that have received approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for consumer use.


So to summarize, it was already known Triclosan is bad, but now there`s proof in large quantities it gives tumors in the livers of mice and it`s still is being used and will be used in products in the future.
edit on 20 11 2014 by BornAgainAlien because: (no reason given)

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 06:04 AM
I have refused to buy soap with it, and try to limit my handwashing at work and opt for alternative methods such as alcohol as often as possible.

ETA: I probably wash my hands about 50 times per work shift. Sometimes well over 100 times.
edit on 20-11-2014 by OccamsRazor04 because: (no reason given)

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 06:06 AM
I think at the end any non natural small compound will be harmful to humans, we had no time to adapt to it naturally so it will take some time until we build resistance.

Few years ago tetrahydrofuran was also deemed carcinogen, for this they put the rats on a rich THF environment for months, no strange enough the once exposed to a concentration high enough to leave them in a state of narcosis for hours after exposure develop higher rates of cancer cell. if you drown in an unnatural media you may develop unnatural disorders after some time who knew

I believe at some point they will say even acetone is carcinogen, i wonder if they do those test to alcohol

But yeah every small enough molecule to enter the cells that we have not been exposed to for millennia must have adverse response in high amounts
edit on 20-11-2014 by Indigent because: (no reason given)

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 06:06 AM
i,ll have to remember not to feed my mice toothpaste and soap

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 06:10 AM
a reply to: suicideeddie

rats eat soap, its fat after all

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 06:12 AM
yikes...thanks for the info. My favorite deodorant just got canned.

here was the list from your link:
Although triclosan is best known for its presence in many brands of antibacterial soap, it is also found in a wide variety of personal care and household products. According to, triclosan is found in the following products:


* Dial® Liquid Soap
* Softsoap® Antibacterial Liquid Hand Soap
* Tea Tree Therapy™ Liquid Soap
* Provon® Soap
* Clearasil® Daily Face Wash
* Dermatologica® Skin Purifying Wipes
* Clean & Clear Foaming Facial Cleanser
* DermaKleen™ Antibacterial Lotion Soap
* Naturade Aloe Vera 80® Antibacterial Soap
* CVS Antibacterial Soap
* pHisoderm Antibacterial Skin Cleanser

Dental Care:

* Colgate Total®; Breeze™ Triclosan Mouthwash
* Reach® Antibacterial Toothbrush
* Janina Diamond Whitening Toothpaste


* Supre® Café Bronzer™
* TotalSkinCare Makeup Kit
* Garden Botanika® Powder Foundation
* Mavala Lip Base
* Jason Natural Cosmetics
* Blemish Cover Stick
* Movate® Skin Litening Cream HQ
* Paul Mitchell Detangler Comb
* Revlon ColorStay LipSHINE Lipcolor Plus Gloss
* Dazzle


* Old Spice High Endurance Stick Deodorant
* Right Guard Sport Deodorant
* Queen Helene® Tea Trea Oil Deodorant and Aloe Deodorant
* Nature De France Le Stick Natural Stick Deodorant
* DeCleor Deodorant Stick
* Epoch® Deodorant with Citrisomes
* X Air Maximum Strength Deodorant

Other Personal Care Products:

* Gillette® Complete Skin Care MultiGel Aerosol Shave Gel
* Murad Acne Complex® Kit®
* Diabet-x™ Cream
* T.Taio™ sponges and wipes
* Aveeno Therapeutic Shave Gel

First Aid:

* SyDERMA® Skin Protectant plus First Aid Antiseptic
* Solarcaine®
* First Aid Medicated Spray;
Nexcare™ First Aid
* Skin Crack Care
* First Aid/Burn Cream
* HealWell® Night Splint
* 11-1X1: Universal Cervical Collar with Microban


* Farberware® Microban Steakknife Set and Cutting Boards
* Franklin Machine Products FMP Ice Cream Scoop SZ 20 Microban
* Hobart Semi-Automatic Slicer
* Chix® Food Service Wipes with Microban
* Compact Web Foot® Wet Mop Heads

Computer Equipment:

* Fellowes Cordless Microban Keyboard and Microban Mouse Pad


* Merrell Shoes
* Sabatier Chef's Apron
* Dickies Socks
* Fruit of the Loom Socks
* Biofresh® Socks

Children's Toys:

* Playskool® :
o Stack 'n Scoop Whale
o Rockin' Radio
o Hourglass
o Sounds Around Driver
o Roll 'n' Rattle Ball
o Animal Sounds Phone
o Busy Beads Pal
o Pop 'n' Spin Top
o Lights 'n' Surprise Laptop


* Bionare® Cool Mist Humidifier
* Microban® All Weather Reinforced Hose
* Thomasville® Furniture
* Deciguard AB Ear Plugs
* Bauer® 5000 Helmet
* Aquatic Whirlpools
* Miller Paint Interior Paint
* QVC® Collapsible 40-Can Cooler
* Holmes Foot Buddy™ Foot Warmer
* Blue Mountain Wall Coverings
* California Paints®
* EHC AMRail Escalator Handrails
* Dupont™ Air Filters
* Durelle™ Carpet Cushions
* Advanta One Laminate Floors
* San Luis Blankets
* J Cloth® towels
* JERMEX mops


posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 06:18 AM
a reply to: Mandroid7

And to add from the comments under the list :

Triclosan is not "naturally" in breast milk. It ends up in breast milk due to the mothers exposer and ingestion of it.

So if you want to have children (also if you have them), you might want be even more aware of it. What I have read about it, it accumulates and so it might give problems later in life.

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 06:42 AM
a reply to: Mandroid7

I never thought of it being in fabric. Thanks for the eye opening on this. I suppose they put it in underwear too.

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 07:19 AM
a reply to: Mandroid7
My favorite deodorant just got canned too. Thanks for the list

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 07:26 AM
Meh. I don't care. Everything causes cancer.

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 10:23 AM
A less sensationalist analysis:

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 10:28 AM
When I went raw vegetarian for a year I barely had to apply any deodorant. Only for those special occasions. Just don't tell anybody, they might question your hygiene.

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 11:34 AM

originally posted by: GetHyped
A less sensationalist analysis:

From the government.

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 11:40 AM
a reply to: BornAgainAlien

Erm... how have you come to that conclusion?

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 11:46 AM
a reply to: GetHyped

Just follow the links...

About Hilda Bastian

A second intercontinental migration ensued in 2011. This time to Washington DC and the National Institutes of Health,* where she works at making clinical effectiveness research accessible with the PubMed Health team.


National Institutes of Health

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is a biomedical research facility primarily located in Bethesda, Maryland, USA. An agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services, it is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical and health-related research


posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 11:55 AM
a reply to: BornAgainAlien

So? Do you have any criticisms of the actual argument other than an ad hominem?

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 12:04 PM
a reply to: GetHyped


However, senator Marty describes the US regulatory system as “one that does not operate under a "precautionary" approach, where regulators err on the side of public safety when determining whether it is acceptable to use a chemical like triclosan”.

He says, instead it tends to allow chemicals or products to be produced and sold, even if there are health concerns, until there is very strong, almost incontrovertible, evidence that the product will cause significant harm.

“This is problematic when the public assumes that government regulators would not allow people to sell products that may harm them. Nevertheless, that is the reality,” he adds.


I don`t have to explain to you about government and lobby, and how America is an oligarchy now do I ?

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 12:42 PM
a reply to: BornAgainAlien

What does this have to do with the article I posted? Do you have any criticisms of the actual argument other than another non sequitur?

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 12:55 PM
a reply to: GetHyped

Do you have any criticisms of the actual argument other than another non sequitur?

I just did.

I`m not that much into the arguments of governments in these kinds of matters because I know about the connections between them and the big chemical and medical companies.

posted on Nov, 20 2014 @ 12:58 PM
I don't buy soap. A bucket of lard and a can of lye will make enough soap to last for a very long time for pennies a bar.

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