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So I Talked To This Ex-Special Forces Guy Today

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posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: Ensinger23

We're all waiting for "more to be revealed"




posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 07:34 PM
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a reply to: Shamrock6

Good to know. I've thought about this a little bit more, and maybe I'm just being paranoid but could it be possible that the government has former spec-op soldiers (if they ever truly get "let go" after doing so much black op stuff) spread disinformation to throw us civvies way off whack?

I only ask because it's something to consider when it comes to the veracity of anything that's being put out there. I'd still approach it with an empty mind, just with a pinch of salt.



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 08:03 PM
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originally posted by: Ensinger23
a reply to: Shamrock6

Good to know. I've thought about this a little bit more, and maybe I'm just being paranoid but could it be possible that the government has former spec-op soldiers (if they ever truly get "let go" after doing so much black op stuff) spread disinformation to throw us civvies way off whack?


Sure they're "let go". I work with a bunch of former service SF. Grant you, the Army loves to stop loss that MOS, because it's long, hard and expensive to train a good one. So they might not let you go until you're old and rickety. The trick is to bail at the first rumors of the next impending stop loss. There was a stop loss that came down in '91 or thereabouts that didn't end for a ridiculous number of years, you had guys in the field retiring in their 40s.

What I have noticed is that if someone is former SOF, they're generally not going to tell you until they know you very well, if at all, because it doesn't really matter. If you weren't one, you won't understand, and if you were, you don't need to be told. Much less strike up a conversation about your service experience with some random guy at a bar.

However, while I don't think there's any sort of organized disinformation campaign being run at bars, I HAVE seen a volunteer setup tried some years back where if you were former SF, you might get a non-paid assignment to monitor certain sites for certain types of posts. That actually had a great ROI, way better than the current automated systems.



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: Ensinger23

former? no. do I think the government has people monitoring sites and either passively or actively spreading dis-info? sure. but when a military guy (or gal) hangs it up and the government checks stop, they move on with their lives. their talents would be far better put to use elsewhere.



posted on Nov, 24 2014 @ 07:20 AM
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a reply to: Shamrock6
a reply to: Bedlam

Awesome. Great to know. I notice I put I would approach it with an "empty" mind, rather than an "open" mind. I guess that's the danger of posting after a day's work.

As to these guys having "skills that are better used elsewhere", I'm not disagreeing, but I know I've heard it from several guys who were regular enlisted, and I've only read from a few guys on the "other-side" that work is hard to come by, unless you're connected. By connected I mean you know someone who either has access to private-sector work for you doing something that involves you being a meat-shield with a gun, or PMC work.

Example: I had a cousin serve as a point-man in his Marine platoon with the 1/3, in Task Force Lava working the Korengal Valley and they had, well there's no other way to put it, a large rate of "turn-around" I guess you can call it.
After he was one of the few original guys remaining, and they were brought back to Kaneohe Bay, he did 2 more tours, and was approached after surviving those tours to join Blackwater. Xe I believe it was called, and Academi now. He accepted, was immediately issued a multi-thousand dollar suit and armor, sent to N. Carolina somewhere and started training on driving limousines evasively. My point being that even after gaining all of this combat knowledge, "battle knowledge" as he put it, he was still only going to be put to work with his life in danger. Maybe these special guys have more advanced skills (which would be classified knowledge, if the equipment was classified) and can get better jobs, but in my mind, NOBODY gets out of this stuff without a few look-ins from the government at unspecified times.

Appreciate the replies, hope this thread amounts to something.


edit on E114021117America/ChicagoMon, 24 Nov 2014 07:21:40 -060023 by Ensinger23 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2014 @ 10:25 AM
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originally posted by: Ensinger23
By connected I mean you know someone who either has access to private-sector work for you doing something that involves you being a meat-shield with a gun, or PMC work.


Well, there's several other possibilities you haven't considered.

One is, there are a number of permanent government jobs doing things both similar and different, that look for that MOS. I can't speak for the Navy guys, but you can often pick up something working for NSA, or on the civilian side of DIA or the like.

And then, there's private work that isn't, exactly. I picked up a steady string of 'summer jobs' in college after service that were moderately to ROFLy shady, that didn't involve being a meat shield. They did, however, feature some eye-opening revelations into how weird things can be behind the scenes, working for the government very indirectly.

It also helps you get contracts with the government, especially the same agencies and military organizations you used to work for.

And a lot of guys come out with more marketable skills than whacking people in the head or stabbing them. It depends on your particular specialties. SAIC hires the crap out of Echoes and Charlies. State hires Foxs. Your alphas hang until retirement and end up in some political end stuff like the Pentagon. Bravos, sadly, tend to end up as cops. Alas.

I know a lot of Deltas that went into medicine. One buddy of mine ended up starting a "secure ambulance" company - they transport rich people to and from hospitals.



I had a cousin serve as a point-man in his Marine platoon with the 1/3...sent to N. Carolina somewhere and started training on driving limousines evasively.


Well, you know, Marine infantry. Go figure.




...in my mind, NOBODY gets out of this stuff without a few look-ins from the government at unspecified times.



Well, that's sort of true. After you ETS, they call you, for about seven years. At first, you get monthly calls, then it drops to quarterly. You get a thinly veiled set of questions about how well you're reintegrating, and they gently remind you of your NDAs. How often they bug you sort of depends on what you did, some people they stop calling at five years.



posted on Nov, 24 2014 @ 10:47 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Awesome info. I hadn't really thought about the medical side of things. You're absolutely right, of course. There is a lot more knowledge to be gained than just the battle side of things. A lot of electrical expertise, of course battlefield medicine (which has to be the highest stress job in military medicine, aside from say neurosurgery but that gets done outside of a warzone), mechanical, analysis..etc.

I guess had he gained skills in something other than combat, it would be a lot easier for him to find a job.

I choose to ignore the rest and still assume the government surveils EVERYONE, ALL THE TIME.



posted on Nov, 24 2014 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: Ensinger23

It's pretty much the same in the Navy and Marines. Certain MOSs have very marketable skills. Some don't. If you spent your time in as a water support technician, you're not going to get out and have much of a relatable job. If you have an MOS requiring a certain set of skills and it translates to a civilian job, it's pretty easy to get selected for it.

The government will keep tabs on people for a while, at least as long as they're contractually obligated to. But unless you have a specific skill set, they're not going to bug you much. Especially right now. If world war 3 kicks off next week, you can bet a lot of phones are going to start ringing though.

As far as going into a PMC, I have several buddies that ended up doing that, at least for a little while. The money is good. I think your phrase "meat shield" is a bit extreme though. All of their training is put to use avoiding having to use their body to stop rounds. If you can make six figures in six months for doing something you're good at and enjoy doing, wouldn't you do it?

The government does use PMCs for some things, but I don't think its so much of "hey we need this site blown up and don't want to send troops in to do it" as it is "this complex needs to be protected and we don't want to task soldiers to stand around doing it."



posted on Nov, 24 2014 @ 10:51 AM
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a reply to: Shamrock6

Posting from my mobile. Somehow I moved the cursor after I started typing so my paragraphs are out of order. Sorry, think it still mostly makes sense though



posted on Nov, 24 2014 @ 11:01 AM
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originally posted by: Ensinger23
a reply to: Bedlam

Awesome info. I hadn't really thought about the medical side of things. You're absolutely right, of course. There is a lot more knowledge to be gained than just the battle side of things.


When I got out, the second summer I was approached to go do a lot of diving. Who and what that was for is a long, funny and morbid story, but it involved diving, and you got paid handsomely for it. And as advertised, most of the dives were nearly recreational. Mostly. You didn't get shot at, and except for one or two of the worst ones, even the 'bad' ones weren't bad.

And only certain types were invited to participate, which was handy, because I really needed the money for school for me and the old lady. It took a lot of the financial pressure off the new marriage.

What was sort of sad was I was getting more than a year's pay as an E6 with all the adders in less than three months of only slightly hazardous work. Nearly no jumps and only a couple of OMG moments.
edit on 24-11-2014 by Bedlam because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2014 @ 11:21 AM
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9 times out of 10, "ex special forces" guys are pretenders. They sure as hell don't talk about what they've done, even to very close family. Even popular or well known ones like Matt Best and Tom Spooner don't talk at length about their experience beyond generalizations.


The thread's premise is for the gullible, I think.



posted on Nov, 24 2014 @ 01:59 PM
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a reply to: palermoman




That is one of the reasons i'm a poor european and i do not wish to live in the states, wishing for the american dream.

The American dream has gone downhill a bit anyway. It is now to work only one job 6 days a week. Live in a nice mobile home and drive something with a cheaper insurance and license cost :-)

I noticed on the news they interviewed a poor working illegal alien in Los Vegas. Her and her children were dressed to the 9's and her house was huge...kitchen was humongous with all the latest appliances and wide beautiful granite countertops...she was a lowly casino worker. Guess the dream is working more for some than others.



posted on Nov, 24 2014 @ 02:31 PM
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a reply to: Shamrock6

I agree with you on this. What is the point of saying
so and so (who is this special forces guy) said 911
was an inside job, but I can't tell you who the guy was
or what he said that convinced me.

No disrespect to the OP, I have found this thread very
interesting.

Rebel 5



posted on Nov, 24 2014 @ 02:48 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

It's amazing how many jobs in the natural resource recovery business you are trained for in the military... Most positions they can look at a military roster and look at job titles and know exactly where someone's gonna fit.

I bet diving was a great one, good extra pay when you gotta step outside the normal environment for humans.

And by "it's amazing how many jobs" it really is..

Heavy machinery operator
Heavy machinery mechanic
Explosives
Diving
Climbing
Flying
Nuclear reactor techs (HUGE MONEY in the civilian world)
And just plain ole grunts. They like grunts in resource recovery..
I'm sure there's many more but you guys get the idea. Army strong is Oil strong!



posted on Nov, 26 2014 @ 03:55 PM
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Your friend sounds like a basic Walter Mitty type who has watched too many movies. I too, sometimes hear rumors about this plot or that plot. No, I don't mean on ATS. a reply to: Blue_Jay33



posted on Dec, 7 2014 @ 11:15 AM
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Saw him again, and although I talked to him, he never said anything this time about covert stuff.
I wasn't going to ask either.



posted on Dec, 26 2014 @ 11:40 PM
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originally posted by: Blue_Jay33
Also what he said made me think of that forced suicide gun device holder from a movie, the clip is on YouTube but I can't find it now. If anybody can find it, post it.


Can describe this a little more? A forced suicide gun device holder? What the heck? You mean something where, if you fire a gun, the bullet actually comes backwards and kills you, making it look like a suicide?? How would that work?



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