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I'm seriously thinking of joining the Air Force.

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posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 07:24 AM
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I'm really thinking of joining the U.S. Air Force because of a few reasons. One: I do want to serve my country and try to better myself. Two: the current job market for $50,000 a year private sector jobs sucks. (At least with the military I'm guaranteed a rewarding career after passing BMT) Three: the benefits are just awesome compared to part time work (free housing, health care & tax free pay) Four: the Air Force seemingly has the easiest BMT out of all branches.

So I just want to get some useful tips to help prepare myself before I join. What is good score for the ASVAB for the Air Force? And what is Air Force BMT really like & what should I know before I get sent to BMT? Also what should I pack? I know they don't allow things like cell phones or electric razors & I should pack light.




posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 07:32 AM
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Awesome! I hope it works out well for you. I was Army. My husband was Air Force. I think the Air Force has the best opportunities for higher learning (free college) and better job skills training that will transfer to civilian life. Do you know what job you want to do in the Air Force?



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 07:42 AM
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a reply to: paranormal78

You won't be serving your country. Instead you'll be serving the military industrial complex and you will be at war. I remember when I joined the USN back in January 2001 and I thought to myself what's the worst that can happen. The rest is history. Do you want to be involved in false wars? That's not serving your country.

That aside, joining the military is a great experience, from training to professionalism to life lessons to benefits, but in this day and age it's just not worth it.

Also, the only pay that is tax free is combat pay or if you're stationed in a combat zone. Otherwise, you're taxed.

If you do ignore the present global situation and join, don't bring anything with you to bootcamp.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 07:58 AM
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a reply to: paranormal78

I'm probably going to try to try something in computers or a base related job in the states or or I might even try for the Air Force reserve. That way I probably won't get sent into combat unless they REALY needed me

I know my way around a computer pretty well so I'm thinking of trying that as a career path for the Air Force. I hear Air Force reserve isn't that bad of a branch to serve. People are rarely ever sent overseas in the reserve especially these days when we are mostly just watching other countries.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 08:18 AM
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a reply to: paranormal78

Well, for one, military pay is not tax-free (combat pay is, but not your basic pay).

I was in the Army, so I don't know how much the basic training differs, but you really can't do much preparing other than getting in good physical shape by doing some good running and body-weight workouts to prepare your muscles. I did a lot of weight training and no running before I joined, and it's just a completely different type of physical stress that my body was not prepared for, so I spent the majority of my first week or so quite sore. You still won't be fully prepared because you'll never voluntarily put yourself through the physical exhaustion you'll get, but at least you'll be a leg-up on the guy that was sitting on his couch his whole life prior to joining.

As for packing, yes, pack light, but pack normal stuff you would take on a trip, as you may need it if you're held up for a week or so prior to actually getting to basic (I was stuck in a "reception" batallion for about a week before actually getting assigned to a real training unit). Anything that you pack will most likely be stored away for the duration of your training--we were taken to the PX (Post Exchange) on a relatively regular basis to purchase care items and underwear and all that crap, so don't expect to be using much of anything that you pack while you're in basic.

Also, get your head in the right frame of mind. Keep reminding yourself that, even if something doesn't seem logical at the time, just do it, because it may just be a small piece to a larger part of the training puzzle. Much of what I went through in basic didn't really make sense until a week or so later, when it was put into use in a training exercise. I was a bit "questioning" at the beginning--drill seargents don't appreciate that.

Know that, at the end of it all, your drill seargents will lighten up and actually become a bit friendly, but at the start--man, it sucks. You think they are pretty much the meanest individuals on the planet. Don't get me wrong...they do like to see you tremble a bit, as they don't have much to amuse them in that job (my father-in-law was a drill sergeant...he's told me stories). Just take that with a grain of salt, try your hardest, and step up to any challenge they throw at you. Even if you fail, as long as you give your all, they'll respect you for it.

And as far as the whole experience goes, embrace it. I went through basic in '98, and I still have fond memories of it and would like to go do some of it over again. It's a once-in-a-lifetime experience that only about 1% of Americans go through, so do it with pride. Disregard all of this nonsense about the military industrial complex--yes, you'll be working for an organization that is easy to hate at times, but as long as you retain your own morals and understand that you only have to follow LAWFUL orders, you'll make it through just fine.

I know this was long, but like I said, I have fond memories of basic training, so I like talking about it.

Also, if you were a chronic pothead like me, wait a full 30 days before going to MEPS and getting drug tested--no point in tempting fate, and chronic marijuana use can stay in your system that long. And for christ's sake, don't do anything stupid to get you kicked out, regardless of what the peer pressure in basic may be--don't be one of those who feels a need to test the rules, because they won't play with you, they'll kick your butt back home in a heartbeat.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 08:24 AM
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a reply to: paranormal78

Good for you! The military-track has offered jobs and valuable training - not to mention being a maturing experience and teaching excellent work skills - for a lot of young people for a long time. And going in with your eye primarily on "serving your country" never goes out of style. Congrats!

All I'd suggest, is check with several AF recruiters to make sure you're getting the real story on what their recruiting quotas are, and if they can "guarantee" you the after-Basic schooling you want. The Air Force has some fascinating facilities/branches on the cutting-edge, from NORAD to Space Command, and your computer skills should be highly prized.

The Pentagon is downsizing their troops sizes now, however. Mainly aimed at the Army - which comprises roughly half our military forces today - all the branches are doing some trimming. And you might want to also read up on what all the branches are up to: www.military.com...

And - to be fair - all the military branches are battling suicide rates and sexual attacks. I would think the Air Force, being smaller and more elite, would have the fewest of those. But if you can talk to someone in or just out of the Air Force, they should be able to tell you what it's really like "on the inside."

Best of Luck!
edit on 19-11-2014 by MKMoniker because: content



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 08:25 AM
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a reply to: SlapMonkey
The military industrial complex is nonsense?

Agree to completely disagree. The so called war on terrorism is akin to the war on drugs as it will be endless. Our foreign policy only continues to encourage terrorism which feeds the MIC. Called it nonsense all you want but the proof is in the pudding.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 08:42 AM
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I was in the USAF, it's a GREAT experience. Let me address your ideas:

1. You WILL get the opportunity to do both. Make sure you come prepared to truly serve. One of the USAF's core values is "Service Before Self". Make sure you're prepared to do that, whatever the cost. Sometimes it's not as glorious as dying, usually it's as mundane as working shifts 7 days a week in the middle of nowhere.

2. Pick your AFSC wisely! Lots of parts of the USAF are down-sizing, so make sure you choose one that has good job security. As boring as it sounds, Security Forces is your best bet.

3. The benefits are very good, but they will require much of you. Are you married? Do you have kids? These are things to consider. If you're fresh out of High School, then these won't be as much of a factor. Also, utilize their education program, get LOTS of degrees, and come out swinging!

4. Okay, this is one we need to have a talk about. This myth is perpetuated by anyone who hasn't been to BMT in the USAF.
USAF BMT is not as physically demanding as, say, the Army or Marines. But it will mentally break you. The USAF cares much more about mentally exhausting and pushing you. This is what I've heard from people who have done BOTH. Do NOT come in there expecting you can handle it. You can't. Those that recognized that did much better. Those that thought it was a cake-walk didn't always make it.

Now, general tips:
- Your ASVAB score should at least be a 70+ to be able to pick/choose your job on your terms. Mine was a 94, so I got to pick literally anything.
- As far as preparing for BMT: get physically fit, do lots of push-ups, running, sit-ups, squat-thrusts, and pull-ups. You will be told to "push" countless times, just prepare yourself.
- When you go to BMT, just blend in. Don't try to be a leader, don't volunteer for jobs, just blend in.
- Practice your Reporting Statement now. When you must speak to a Training Instructor (TI), you will have to begin each statement with a Reporting Statement. Mine for instance was "Sir, Trainee Smith Reports As Ordered." In context, let's say he asked me how old I was. If I simply said "21, sir." I would be in a world of trouble. Rather, I would say "Sir, Trainee Smith Reports as Ordered. Sir, I am 21."
- They will play mind games with you. You will fail them. The first-half of BMT is designed to confuse you, so ride that confusion It's OKAY!
- I could answer questions for hours about this honestly, feel free to PM me.

As far as what to pack, your Recruiter should give you a list. Follow the list.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 09:12 AM
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a reply to: paranormal78

OP

as it was already mentioned in this thread

You would become a killer for money.

Better to be poor than to sell your soul for 12 pieces of silver.

However, if you'd be one of those officers who would reject an order to fight in war of OFFENSE instead of defense, then US army does need people like you.

But i doubt it, you sound too greenhorn to have well defined moral compass, just my opinion.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 09:32 AM
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originally posted by: WineWithIce5
a reply to: paranormal78

OP

as it was already mentioned in this thread

You would become a killer for money.

Better to be poor than to sell your soul for 12 pieces of silver.


BWahahahahah! He's talking about the air force. The most dangerous thing I carried on a daily basis was a crescent wrench. Please, educate before you masticate.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 09:44 AM
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a reply to: paranormal78

Great choice. As gatorboi117 mentioned, pick your AFSC wisely. I'd say be sure your tech school is longer than 2 months. ( the longer the better)

Basic is not hard as long as you know going into it that everything they have you do, has a purpose. Even if you think it's idiotic, there is a reason. And they won't hit you or make you do push ups. They will yell and try to get you flustered, but it's part of their training. You will learn the term 'military bearing'. Stand tall, look straight, answer directly, and don't offer any more than you are asked. Basic will be over before you know it. (if you are lucky enough to be in the 3708th, you will be among some fine men)

Tech school will be very structured at first. Prioritize your time, work first, study, then play. (trust me, don't screw up and it will be a breeze) And follow the rules. You don't want to get in trouble. It's too easy to just do what you are supposed to and not be made an example of.

Pick only duty stations you WANT to go to. And don't be afraid to ask around before you pick. It's important to know the area and if you will enjoy it. You may be there for a long time.

And lastly, don't take this the wrong way, but, stay single and take remote tours if offered. You will be able to see amazing places and meet amazing people. But, if you get attached, it's hard to leave them. ENJOY yourself. The USAF is an amazing opportunity.

Good Luck!

Oh, and don't waste your GI bill.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 09:45 AM
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a reply to: network dude

Being that right now the US is bombing Iraq with airstrikes and the ME suffers from drone strikes he will indeed be apart of the killing machine. He's not boots on the ground, he'll be bombs from above. Being apart of the military means you are apart of the killing machine, so to speak.

That all said, it really does piss me off that the US leadership abuses the military the way it does because it really is one of the best life experiences out there that teaches you so much. But anyone who joins now must understand the perpetual war they'll be joining. The wars in the ME aren't going anywhere, we're gonna be in there for a very long time, definitely longer than any 4 year enlisted contract.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 09:50 AM
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Air Force would be my second choice, but... Do the best you can in boot. Have a plan to attend school after boot (in addition to your AIT, if that's what its still called). During boot, look in to what the AF offers that would make you a career after the service, like specialized welding, air frame maintenance, propulsion system maintenance, etc. These specialties are really needed in the real world and some of them pay well.

When you are in boot, you will meet with the HR officer to see what you are interested in, in addition to what you signed up for. The recruiter "guaranteed" you will get what you want and then the Air Force will put you where they see fit. If you really like to be what you signed up for, keep the original of your contract safe somewhere and make copies of it to show when asked.

Also, when you meet with HR, please don't go in there and say something like "I joined the AF to gets to fly and kills the enemy". you will forever be an airman. Go in with a plan and discuss your future, the HR's future, and the future of the USAF and how you will be able to contribute to all - and mean it!

Good Luck and I really hope this works out for you.

NF



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 11:31 AM
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Congratulations on wanting to give something back to your country.


What to take with you to basic training: Just the clothes you are wearing and some identification papers,the recruiter can tell what papers to bring.Everything you take with you will put in storage and you will be issued everything you need from underwear to eyeglasses.

The physical training isn`t extremely difficult but the Air Force basic training base is located in san Antonio Texas and it gets pretty hot there.
I`m from the northeast and I arrived at lackland AFB on the Friday of memorial day weekend.June and July in Texas was a lot hotter than I was accustomed to but I made it through just fine.

Here`s a true story of something that happened that will give you an idea of the way they like to test you.

We had this guy named Mosely,he was the last guy to join our flight, and right from the start their was something different about him.
While he was in our flight he would try to entice people to do unethical things.For example he would pull people aside and tell them that his cousin worked in the infirmary and that if you went to the infirmary his cousin would give you medical excuse to avoid physical training for a day or just let you lay around in the air conditioned infirmary all day.
In the military that`s called Malingering and is a pretty serious offense.
He tried that on me and I told him "I didn`t come here to lay around all day I was doing that at home".

On inspection days he would always be the last one out of the barracks and we would always fail the inspection because something wasn`t the way it should be.Things like beds that weren`t made,shoes that weren`t lined up correctly under the bunks ect.
Towards the end of basic training this Mosely guy just disappeared and we were told that he went awol.
After comparing stories about the things this guy did we all came to the conclusion that he was probably a spy/sabatour placed to test our honesty and to see how we would react as a team to the things he was doing.

Just remember there is a right way a wrong way and the military way and be prepared to hurry up and wait.We did a lot of standing around waiting to do something.

Try to get a skill that can be used in civilian life when you get out.I was 17 and dumb I thought it would be really cool to be a weapons mechanic loading bombs and missiles onto planes.obviously that`s isn`t a skill that is needed in civilian life.

Military training will teach you things that will serve you well throughout your entire life.Good Luck.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 12:42 PM
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Good for you. A military career is certainly a stable career, with some nice benefits. And you can retire early, and come back as a civilian to a Federal job, which is nice.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 01:20 PM
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originally posted by: Swills
a reply to: SlapMonkey
The military industrial complex is nonsense?

Agree to completely disagree. The so called war on terrorism is akin to the war on drugs as it will be endless. Our foreign policy only continues to encourage terrorism which feeds the MIC. Called it nonsense all you want but the proof is in the pudding.


You misinterpreted my point (and I didn't state it very well after re-reading it)--what I was meaning was that, if he/she really wants to join, disregard that aspect of it, as long as he/she can stay true to what they believe and not get sucked in to all the indoctrination that, by perpetually fighting a war that minimally affects us positively, they're fighting for democracy and our freedom.

Luckily, I got out before 9/11 happened, so I didn't have to deal with the war-for-profit mentality that came along since 2002 through the present, but my wife did, and had to deploy, as did many of my friends. I completely agree that the wars that are being fought will be endless unless someone has the leadership skills to slam their hand on a desk, yell "ENOUGH ALREADY!!!," and bring our Service Members home where they can actually do things that serve this country.

I'm borderline isolationist when it comes to the military, so we don't disagree, I just made my point unintelligibly.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: WineWithIce5

What an ignorant statement. I served four years and never killed anything but a few paper and pop-up targets. Of course, I never deployed, but my wife did, and she killed exactly the same things I did.

Get a f**king clue and stop with the hyperbole.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: Swills

No, actually, that is really incorrect. See, there are different branches of the military, and then in each branch, there are different jobs in the military.

In the USAF, a guy walking in off the street without a degree, will be enlisted. So he will not jump from basic training, to flying bombardier on a B2. He may get trained in how to fix a B2, or maybe even the cream of the crop.... a C-130.

But airmen have kind of regular jobs. They fix planes, drink a lot, sleep in nice hotels, and generally have a good time. I think you may be thinking of Marines. They get to have guns and shoot stuff. Army guys get guns too. Air force people get tool boxes.

You should really get out more.

Oh, and the military doesn't get to pick who they go after, that's the politicians. Most who join the military do so our of a deep love and respect for their country. And they have that deep respect so others can freely say all sorts of silly things about it and them. It's something some folks could never comprehend.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 02:23 PM
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a reply to: Tardacus

Lackland in January is quite far from hot. Texas is a strange place.



posted on Nov, 19 2014 @ 03:15 PM
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a reply to: network dude

Oh I get it and know full well someone enlisting in the AF will not be flying aircraft. Kinda like there are two kinds of Marines, those that fight in combat and everyone else, eg mechanics, cooks, intel guys, doctors, etc.

The point is that no matter what job you have in the military doesn't change the fact that you are apart of the military and supporting it 24/7, which also means you will be supporting the endless wars.



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