It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

probe to the moon........why?

page: 7
9
<< 4  5  6    8 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 22 2014 @ 06:02 PM
link   
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People




The outer belt is less intense, and does extend further north and south. neither belt reaches all the way to the poles, as this simplified schematic shows:

Think about what the aurora are. Near the poles the magnetic field is nearly perpendicular to the surface. It directs energetic particles downward where they encounter atoms in the upper atmosphere and expend their energy in a blaze of glory.

At the equator the field is parallel to the surface. The particles don't have anywhere to go. They stay trapped, until they work their way to the either pole and do their kamikaze dive into the atmosphere.

Jupiter's got 'em too.
en.wikipedia.org.../File:Jupiter_radio.jpg
edit on 11/22/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 22 2014 @ 06:22 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: southbeach



And you have a couple trillion dollars laying around to fund a colony, right?


It funny you say that. Considering that amount was missing after 911. Maybe the powers that be want to tunnel under the moon now. I'm sure that there are tunnels in the moon already. They might want to tunnel to find the other tunnels and see where they go. perhaps. GO GOPHERS.



posted on Nov, 22 2014 @ 06:28 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage


Funny you mention magnetic poles. two days ago my compass pointed NORTH. The black needle with the hole pointed to NORTH. Now the white needle points north. I don't think it is broken. Their is no magnatism reacting apon it. SO what gives. In the two days it must have got broke or something. Are your compasses working fine?



posted on Nov, 22 2014 @ 06:29 PM
link   
a reply to: cloaked4u

I have a marine compass on my desk. It's working fine. I checked, just for you.

edit on 11/22/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 22 2014 @ 06:38 PM
link   
a reply to: Phage



why thank you phage. My compass must be broken then. I don't understand why or how it got broken. Maybe something magnetic in the area it's reacting to. Can a compass just one day all of a sudden malfunction? I think i will go to cabella's to buy a new one. I need some whool socks anyways for winter.



posted on Nov, 22 2014 @ 06:40 PM
link   
a reply to: cloaked4u




Can a compass just one day all of a sudden malfunction?

Yes. Especially cheap ones.
Mine is something like this. Good for a boat but not so much for backpacking though.
www.amazon.com...



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 04:17 AM
link   
Why probe the moon:
Well for mapping,you can't mine it if you don't know, where you find what.
Mining the Moon

Sounds smart if you ask me. Water, HE-3, and maybe a starting point for further travells, saving the energy of passing through the lower Earth orbit.

The Chinese tried to be first, but their bunny didn't hop...
edit on -06:00America/ChicagoAmerica/ChicagopSundayAmerica/Chicago by Peeple because: What



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 11:20 AM
link   
a reply to: onebigmonkey

if they show their clear concern about passing VA belts ,it will certainly question the authenticity of Apollo and no one wants/ dare to do it in main stream science community.
i am all most certain that in our life time we will not going to see some one going through VA belts . as Russia said long ago "our future is in the low earth orbits" and we better admits it now.



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 11:25 AM
link   
a reply to: parapropter

Have you even bothered to look at the studies of the belts? Or just parrot what you've heard? They are very thin over the poles, where it would be easy to pass through quickly, which is exactly what they did. Funny that Dr Van Allen didn't think that short trips through them was a problem.



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 12:01 PM
link   

originally posted by: parapropter
a reply to: onebigmonkey

if they show their clear concern about passing VA belts ,it will certainly question the authenticity of Apollo and no one wants/ dare to do it in main stream science community.
i am all most certain that in our life time we will not going to see some one going through VA belts . as Russia said long ago "our future is in the low earth orbits" and we better admits it now.


These would be the same Russians who sent biological samples around the moon, and who did their own research on the VAB and didn't see any problem with getting people through them?

Have a read of some of their research from the early space race:

babel.hathitrust.org...

You can even buy the original in Russian on ebay (search for it).

Here's some more

epizodsspace.no-ip.org...

Mainstream science always questions things, it's how science works and it's how you know anything at all.
edit on 23-11-2014 by onebigmonkey because: more info



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 12:54 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: parapropter

Have you even bothered to look at the studies of the belts? Or just parrot what you've heard? They are very thin over the poles, where it would be easy to pass through quickly, which is exactly what they did. Funny that Dr Van Allen didn't think that short trips through them was a problem.


If short trips didn't pose a problem It's so so funny that the Russians never launched a single human being over 475km space altitude... and Russians stayed below the belts for 50 years. I like to refer to it as the Russian Glass Ceiling.

Other advanced western countries such as UK, France or Germany might have already combined 25-30 years ago on a human space flight beyond the Glass Ceiling but they haven't really tried. These countries that are the most densely populated on the planet, #1 India, #2 China, #9 Russian and #10 Japan have working lunar space programs but yet to break through to the other side (475km) with human flight testing.

Dr. Van Allen's statement about short trips through the belts is simply a statement, not evidence of an accomplishment.



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 01:01 PM
link   
a reply to: SayonaraJupiter

Russia attempted to but the rocket that would have taken them past it failed spectacularly and effectively ended their moon attempts. Since the point was to get their first, and that failure put them so far behind they essentially gave up.

Why would the ESA bother? The cost to recreate Apollo is high, and a longer stay even higher. China is trying for their own reasons.

You can call it a loaf of bread for all I care. The fact is that Dr Van Allen had a lot more knowledge on the subject than you or I ever will.



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 01:17 PM
link   

originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: sparky31

And what good does a mission that stayed on the moon for a total of a couple of days when you're talking about a mission that has a minimum duration of six months? Apollo 17 had a total of 75 hours on the surface. That's going to give you great data for that THREE DAYS. That's not going to tell you what kind of exposures you're looking at over a week, or a month, or a year. Which is what you need to stay there.

What good does being on the surface, nowhere near the most likely landing areas for a long term colony, do for helping to plan for a colony, or even a science base that is there for months at a time? The Apollo missions were nowhere near the South Pole, which is the most likely place for a base to stay, as there is ice there, which would give them water for various things in the base.

Yes, we've been there, but again, the manned missions wouldn't give you enough data that is needed for a long term stay on the moon.



Where were the probes that checked for all eventualities before they sent the first human over?
Where were the probes to check that the probes would be safe?
Where were the probes before settlers went to the Americas?
Heck we need more probes.

What I am saying here is that we have managed to sent people to the moon after a nine month quicky, quicky session in which they build a rocket and a lander and didn't care about the van Allen belt, had no practice yet seemed to have managed fine. All that so they could be there before the Russians. However 55 years later in a much more technically advanced future with tons more knowledge about the Moon, suddenly doing the same requires:

-more money
-more probes
-more probes
-and some more probes to check out stuff that we already know about.

They knew F-all about the moon and how humans on it could survive even for hours but they still went. Because there isn't much more to know. The once pioneering spirit has become a probe-dependant spirit.
What is there to know?
We know how high the radiation is, so sent materials up there that can withstand such radiation.
We know how humans interact in small spaces, so deal with it psychologically.
We know the temperature up there, so bring plenty of blankets and suncream.

We know the consistency of the Moon surface, so no surprises here.

Everything else is just excuses.

The Moon is known to us in and out, we have computers to calculate radiation and materials, we can even recreate those conditions here on Earth and do a trial run, just get on with it...unless we've never been there in the first place and it is actually impossible for humans to do and excuses have to be made so nobody ever finds out. But that's a different story.

edit on 23-11-2014 by Hecate666 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 01:28 PM
link   
a reply to: Hecate666

We don't know the moon "inside and out". As for the first trip to the moon they practiced and perfected technology for years ahead of time with LEO missions. They studied the Van Allen Belts, and everything they could prior to going.

Staying for months at a time isn't something you just do. Shielding in space is totally different for long term than short term like Apollo. One reason for not being there now is precisely that. They're still experimenting with shielding.



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 01:42 PM
link   

originally posted by: SayonaraJupiter
Dr. Van Allen's statement about short trips through the belts is simply a statement, not evidence of an accomplishment.

No, but rhetorically stating "Passing through the Van Allen Belts would have killed the astronauts" without evidence to back up that statement isn't evidence of a hoax, either.

The point is that hoax believers "say" that the Van Allen Belts were impassable, but the people who study the Van Allen Belts have evidence to the contrary.



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 01:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: Hecate666
...We know how high the radiation is, so sent materials up there that can withstand such radiation...


Well, yeah. I'm sure we know what sort of shielding could prevent exposure to deadly radiation levels, but the trick is figuring out a way to make shielding that is light enough to be practical.

I'm sure they can make a Moon Habitat that has shielding that could keep the crew safe for months or even years at a time, but if that shielding is so heavy that it takes 5 or 10 rocket launches to get that habitat into space in light enough pieces, assemble it, and get it to the Moon, then the cost of doing so would be so exorbitant that it makes such a mission unfeasible.



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 02:59 PM
link   
a reply to: sparky31


has anyone clicked the hidden link found on the OP link? "Lunar Mission One"...

...Lunar Mission One aims to survey the Moon's south pole to see if a human base can be set up in the future



on that click you will find a proprietary web page:

www.lunarmissionone.com...

a 2nd click has this explainatory page:




The Lunar Missions Trust is a not for profit organisation. The Trust is overseeing the governance of the Lunar Mission One project and will lead a worldwide programme of educational engagement funded by the project.
Any surplus revenues from Lunar Mission One will be placed in the Trust, to support further space exploration and fund future space projects – creating a powerful, long term legacy.
Our Vision
The Lunar Missions Trust’s objectives are “the advancement of education and research in the fields of space science, engineering and technology and promotion of the applications thereof”. We want to ensure that a meaningful, substantial and inclusive global legacy is gained from the success of Lunar Mission One; a legacy of global education, public engagement in science and future space exploration



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 04:29 PM
link   
a reply to: St Udio


the more I read up on the hyper link found in the OP link...
I am inclined to put this whole scheme in the same category as the Carbon Tax/ Carbon Footprint matrix dreamed up by the Globalists like Gore, and the eugenics themes sponsored by bill & Melinda Gates fame


 


www.lunarmissionone.com...

1. Lunar Mission One will make a unique contribution to our knowledge and understanding of the origins of the Moon and the Earth. The innovative drilling technology we develop will also be a major leap forward for safer and more efficient remote drilling on Earth.

2. Lunar Mission One will make fresh scientific discoveries on the Moon, but we also want the project to help us learn more about our own planet and its history. Bringing together schools, academics and the general public from across the world, Lunar Mission One will provide the funds to create a publically assembled, free to access digital record of Life on Earth – of human history and civilisation, and a scientific description of the biosphere with a database of species. Publically owned and accessible to all, our Public Archive is a hugely ambitious plan that could only be resourced by a project of this scale.

3. Alongside the public archive, this time capsule will contain millions of individual ‘digital memory boxes’. By pledging £60 ($94) or more on Kickstarter, people will be able to reserve their own digital memory box. Later on we intend to sell these direct to the general public and we anticipate that millions of people will buy one.


4. Alongside the public archive, this time capsule will contain millions of individual ‘digital memory boxes’. By pledging £60 ($94) or more on Kickstarter, people will be able to reserve their own digital memory box. Later on we intend to sell these direct to the general public and we anticipate that millions of people will buy one.

Private archiveWhat can I put in it?

You can upload any digital information you want into your memory box – dependent on capacity: a simple message, photos, video, a family tree. There will also be the option to store DNA code in a physical space, via the submission of a strand of hair.

This collection of digital memory boxes will probably run to tens of Terabytes of data. To put this into perspective, a photograph can range from kilobytes to megabytes in size. Precise costings for data have not yet been confirmed but the more space bought, the more expensive it will be.

How will it work?

During the next four or five years as we develop the project further, we will be creating an online portal for people to start uploading information into their digital memory boxes. They will be able to buy more space, add, delete and change information right up until just before the Mission launches and the time capsule is sealed. People will be able to buy memory boxes for themselves, or as gifts, via the Mission website. We currently expect that the average cost will be around $80. Those who have reserved their place in space as a Kickstarter supporter will receive a voucher that they can redeem upon the opening of the online portal.

We understand that people uploading information into their memory box will often want to keep this information private. We will be putting stringent measures in place to ensure that private information is secured. We anticipate a structure for the portal not dissimilar to a Facebook page – where you can choose who to share your information with, if anyone.

5. There are three main stages to the fundraising process.

The first stage will aim to raise approximately £600,000 (around $900,000) using international crowd-funding platform Kickstarter. This is not intended to raise all the money required for the mission – it will simply finance the initial project management and programme planning phase. Similar projects on Kickstarter such as the Arkyd space telescope have raised in excess of this.


 

 



this looks like a long term, fat cat type of project with good-pay low intelligence & work load for appointed positions who Know-Whats-Best-for-the-riff-raff that CROWD FUND the lucrative, utopian job for the select few...

its a generational kind of paradigm for the elites, kinda like the Rotschild central banker dynasty empire created for that particular family blood line






edit on rd30141678187723312014 by St Udio because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 06:18 PM
link   

originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People
I'm sure they can make a Moon Habitat that has shielding that could keep the crew safe for months or even years at a time, but if that shielding is so heavy that it takes 5 or 10 rocket launches to get that habitat into space in light enough pieces, assemble it, and get it to the Moon, then the cost of doing so would be so exorbitant that it makes such a mission unfeasible.



Simply burying such a habitat under a few meters of lunar soil (regolith) should suffice.



posted on Nov, 23 2014 @ 07:07 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

Except they need to get the equipment to bury it up there.




top topics



 
9
<< 4  5  6    8 >>

log in

join