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SR-71A Cockpit View

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posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 08:44 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: thishereguy

Of which? The first link?



the cockpit view.look outside the plane into the hangar.




posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 08:45 PM
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a reply to: thishereguy

Yeah, it's one of the museum aircraft. Probably the AF museum at Wright Patterson.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 08:45 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

ah, ok thanks.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 08:47 PM
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a reply to: thishereguy

Damn I'm good.
It's the National Museum of the US Air Force.

Here's a lot more that you can do
edit on 11/16/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 08:48 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: eisegesis

No, you'd be wearing a space suit and diaper for the mission.

Well, you learn something new every day.




As space travel became more sophisticated, so too did space underwear. Above is the catch-all diaper/undergarment Sally Ride wore when she blasted off in the Space Shuttle Challenger on June 18, 1983 to became the first American woman to leave earth’s atmosphere.

But as space shuttle missions became more common, the astronaut equivalent of adult diapers became more casual too. Most of the time in space, shuttle crew members were able to wear their own underwear. They only wore accident-prevention diapers for takeoffs and landings.

For takeoffs and landing, lol. Tighter than a frog's ass doesn't apply in those situations.


After Sheppard urinated in his suit they finally started making pee bags mandatory. That one is Glenn's. He never used it so it went into a museum.


Sheppard had asked for one but the NASA engineers on the ground told him he didn’t need one. Of course he ended up urinating inside his spacesuit and short-circuited his biosensors.

Link
edit on 16-11-2014 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 08:53 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: thishereguy

Damn I'm good.
It's the National Museum of the US Air Force.

Here's a lot more that you can do





thanks, now i got something to do when there's those boring times on the internet.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 08:53 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

ummm the military freqs are available all over the place including flight charts.

Here is just one place



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 08:55 PM
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Man it must feel (have felt) awesome to shove that left lever up into afterburner.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 08:56 PM
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a reply to: whywhynot

NOW they are. When they were flying this in the 1960s and 70s military frequencies for command posts, and the people that the SR-71 would be talking to were classified. You have to think back to Cold War days, not look at things as they are now.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 09:07 PM
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a reply to: thishereguy

geez, all that chipped paint , you would have thought it would be taken care of a little bit better.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 09:10 PM
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a reply to: thishereguy

It's the "shiny switch theory". The shiny switches were the ones used the most, so if the emergency switches were shiny, get another airplane.


The right side is where pilots would rest their arms a lot. It wore the paint off from rubbing on their suit arms.
edit on 11/16/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 09:12 PM
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originally posted by: thishereguy
a reply to: thishereguy

geez, all that chipped paint , you would have thought it would be taken care of a little bit better.

Lot of hours in there..

found a link that describes some of the instrument panel. Go to page 58 in here…

Instrument panel functions



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 09:13 PM
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a reply to: thishereguy

www.nmusafvirtualtour.com...

here is the rear cockpit view.

hat tip to Zaphod for the link.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 09:15 PM
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a reply to: thishereguy

This is the one that you almost never got to see before it was retired. This is where the real work took place.

I always found it interesting that they measured the film in the camera in miles.
edit on 11/16/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 09:22 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

lol , that must of been some spool of film. just kidding. in the rear there's books from 1990 sitting there. not sure what they're for m but interesting. just can't stop looking at this thing.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 09:25 PM
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originally posted by: Socrato
Man it must feel (have felt) awesome to shove that left lever up into afterburner.


Poor quality, night time take off. Bird is :45 seconds gone and they are still yelling to hear each other on the runway.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 09:29 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Some places actually limited the amount of afterburner they could use for take off because of noise restrictions. They couldn't use full afterburner, depending on where they were.
edit on 11/16/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 09:44 PM
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That stupid usaf song only ever made me think of one plane, and this was it.

Guy I worked with in the 90's did time on the 71 when he first joined, said it was an absolute nightmare.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 09:46 PM
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a reply to: Irishhaf

Oh dear god yes. The one that Brian Shul took over Libya was a holy terror to fly he said, until they crossed the Line of Death, then he said it was the best airplane he ever flew.

There were a lot of little things that you didn't have to think about with other aircraft. For example, tire pressure. The pressure had to be run so high that if they ran pretty much anything over, they'd blow a tire.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 09:50 PM
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a reply to: thishereguy

in the front view, behind the seat. there's a valve with a piece of paper stuck in it. would that be for the oxygen hose for the pilots helmet?



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