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Strict Anti-Drug Governor Pardons His Son For Marijuana Trafficking Charge

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posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 09:32 AM
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originally posted by: Mirthful Me
Dems will be Dems...

Wait until you see 0bummer's pardon list...


Nice political bait...

As other have said, Beebe has pardoned many other nonviolent drug offenders. Many politicians on both sides have pardoned people who were involved in some serious crimes, like Iran-Contra, perjury, bank fraud, extortion, illegal campaign contributions and obstruction of justice... All pardoned by republicans...




posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 12:09 PM
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It is amazing, and a bit sickening, that Beebe will leave office next January due to term limits. He is unwittingly illustrating the very need for term limits, but is too stupid to understand his abuse of political affiliation is showing right through here, and is even setting the stage for one of the reasons term limits has been said to be necessary. And at the same time, he is doing exactly what he said he wouldn't do when he was attorney general of the state of Arkansas.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
And at the same time, he is doing exactly what he said he wouldn't do when he was attorney general of the state of Arkansas.


How does pardoning his son constitute "special treatment" when he's done the same for many others in the same situation?



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 12:53 PM
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a reply to: six67seven

Psssstt! Regan's so called laws had to go through Congress, shouldn't they bear some of the responsibility as well?



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 01:12 PM
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a reply to: sirhumperdink

So she's not supposed to have her own opinion about the president???



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 01:25 PM
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originally posted by: HomerinNC
a reply to: sirhumperdink

So she's not supposed to have her own opinion about the president???



Everyone is entitled to their opinion, including the opinion that someone's opinion is stupid



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 01:41 PM
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originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic

originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
And at the same time, he is doing exactly what he said he wouldn't do when he was attorney general of the state of Arkansas.


How does pardoning his son constitute "special treatment" when he's done the same for many others in the same situation?


It's all about public perception.

And how transparent a mirror is.




posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 01:55 PM
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Hopefully many more pardons for minor drug offenses will be handed down, not only in Arkansas but all over the world. Obama shouldn't have to be reminded about his youthful experimentation (love that word) with marijuana, and should have already pardoned anyone in prison for such offenses. Times they be a'changin', and all that.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 02:35 PM
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a reply to: AlaskanDad

Beebe is NOT a "strict anti-drug governor". This governor is tough on the drug trade, but not possession. I'm not sure I see the problem with this... Can you elaborate? "Politicians and their tough on crime games" doesn't say much. Do you agree or disagree with what the governor is doing?

a reply to: Aleister

That's what I thought when I heard this story. "Good! They should be pardoned."



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 04:22 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

Maybe because he stated way back when, that he would not give his son any special consideration?

Just forget for a moment any special consideration he might have given someone else in similar circumstances, and consider instead what he specifically mentions about his son early on, about not doing this.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 04:35 PM
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originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
Just forget for a moment any special consideration he might have given someone else in similar circumstances, and consider instead what he specifically mentions about his son early on, about not doing this.


If he gave them all "special consideration", then none of them received "special consideration". It's not unusual for a governor to pardon people. How is any of it "special consideration"? He's an executive of the government, who has the power to pardon others. What's special about that?

He treated his son no differently or "specially" from anyone else he pardoned. Therefore there's no "special consideration" involved.

The only way I can see this being a negative issue is for the sake of politics. Clearly, some think this is a politically driven issue because he's a Democrat. That's an extremely weak argument, considering all previous pardons and confusing as hell to me. On a board whose members are overwhelmingly FOR less government involvement in our personal lives and FOR the legalization of marijuana, for people to find this governor's action to be somehow wrong or special, is a little bit hypocritical, IMO. And the only reason I can imagine is politics...

Am I wrong? What special consideration did he give?



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic


Beebe is NOT a "strict anti-drug governor". This governor is tough on the drug trade, but not possession. I'm not sure I see the problem with this... Can you elaborate? "Politicians and their tough on crime games" doesn't say much. Do you agree or disagree with what the governor is doing?


FTA:


In 2011, at the Arkansas “State of The State Address”, Beebe called for stricter penalties against drug sellers, saying that: “Our drug statutes must put a stronger emphasis and heavier penalties on those involved with the drug trade,



In his petition for a pardon, Kyle admitted to selling drugs, an activity that his father has called for steep penalties against.


imho - That would make the Governor a hypocrite, as are many of todays professional politicians!

It is nice the Gov has pardoned some (700?) drug offenders, but it might be wise to look at the law that is putting them in prison in the first place.



edit on 17-11-2014 by AlaskanDad because: removed reply to from quote for clarity



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 05:06 PM
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originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic

originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
Just forget for a moment any special consideration he might have given someone else in similar circumstances, and consider instead what he specifically mentions about his son early on, about not doing this.


If he gave them all "special consideration", then none of them received "special consideration". It's not unusual for a governor to pardon people. How is any of it "special consideration"? He's an executive of the government, who has the power to pardon others. What's special about that?

He treated his son no differently or "specially" from anyone else he pardoned. Therefore there's no "special consideration" involved.

The only way I can see this being a negative issue is for the sake of politics. Clearly, some think this is a politically driven issue because he's a Democrat. That's an extremely weak argument, considering all previous pardons and confusing as hell to me. On a board whose members are overwhelmingly FOR less government involvement in our personal lives and FOR the legalization of marijuana, for people to find this governor's action to be somehow wrong or special, is a little bit hypocritical, IMO. And the only reason I can imagine is politics...

Am I wrong? What special consideration did he give?


He, (THE GOVERNOR HIMSELF), is the one who used the word, or meaning, of "special consideration" when he specifically mentioned his son and how he would not use his political power in his son's predicament.

I hope this helps. If you have any further issues, perhaps you can call the governor and have him answer your questions.
It is all about what he said, and what he subsequently did. NOT about what I think or said, or what I believe.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 05:09 PM
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originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed

originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic

originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
Just forget for a moment any special consideration he might have given someone else in similar circumstances, and consider instead what he specifically mentions about his son early on, about not doing this.


If he gave them all "special consideration", then none of them received "special consideration". It's not unusual for a governor to pardon people. How is any of it "special consideration"? He's an executive of the government, who has the power to pardon others. What's special about that?

He treated his son no differently or "specially" from anyone else he pardoned. Therefore there's no "special consideration" involved.

The only way I can see this being a negative issue is for the sake of politics. Clearly, some think this is a politically driven issue because he's a Democrat. That's an extremely weak argument, considering all previous pardons and confusing as hell to me. On a board whose members are overwhelmingly FOR less government involvement in our personal lives and FOR the legalization of marijuana, for people to find this governor's action to be somehow wrong or special, is a little bit hypocritical, IMO. And the only reason I can imagine is politics...

Am I wrong? What special consideration did he give?


He, (THE GOVERNOR HIMSELF), is the one who used the word, or meaning, of "special consideration" when he specifically mentioned his son and how he would not use his political power in his son's predicament.

I hope this helps. If you have any further issues, perhaps you can call the governor and have him answer your questions.
It is all about what he said, and what he subsequently did. NOT about what I think or said, or what I believe.


He didn't give his son special consideration. His sin was sentenced and fulfilled his sentence. The pardon just struck the crime from his permanent record so he wouldn't be considered a felon for a nonviolent drug crime. He did the exact same for hundreds of others. So he gave his son no special consideration. Looks like he stuck to his word.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 05:16 PM
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originally posted by: AlaskanDad
That would make the Governor a hypocrite, as are many of todays professional politicians!


His son had a couple ounces and was convicted of possession, not trafficking. The phrase "drug trade" indicates a much larger organization that manufactures, transports and sells drugs on a global level. Not some guy selling an ounce or two. There's a HUGE difference between possession of a small amount and being a drug cartel in the drug trade.

Source



At the time of the arrest, Gov. Beebe was quoted in a local newspaper saying, "If he broke the law, he needs to pay for it. He needs to be treated like everybody else-no better, worse."


The son broke the law and paid for it.

Source



"For any pardons the governor does, the person has to have finished all terms of their sentence ... and then had a period of time where they've shown they have straightened their lives out."

Kyle Beebe, who is now 34, was convicted in 2003 of possession of a controlled substance -- marijuana. He was fined and sentenced to three years supervised probation, according to CNN affiliate KATV.




It is nice the Gov has pardoned some (700?) drug offenders, but it might be wise to look at the law that is putting them in prison in the first place.


I absolutely agree. But it's also legal for the governor to pardon people. I don't see any hypocrisy.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 05:26 PM
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originally posted by: NoCorruptionAllowed
He, (THE GOVERNOR HIMSELF), is the one who used the word, or meaning, of "special consideration" when he specifically mentioned his son and how he would not use his political power in his son's predicament.


Ah! But he didn't say he wouldn't use his political power, did he? He said he wouldn't use "special consideration". That's two different things. If he used his political power to pardon other people for similar charges, then it's not special consideration to use his political power to pardon his son.



If you have any further issues, perhaps you can call the governor and have him answer your questions.
It is all about what he said, and what he subsequently did. NOT about what I think or said, or what I believe.


He did what he said he would do, so I don't see any issues at all. If you think using one's powers bestowed by the state constitution means the same thing as "special treatment", you're mistaken.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

He asked for "heavier penalties on those involved with the drug trade" and then removes a part of the punishment. Being it was his son, it was legal, nor his political party have anything to do with it, he said one thing and then did another, imho - that makes him a hypocrite.

OTOH - You make some good points



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 06:08 PM
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originally posted by: AlaskanDad
a reply to: Benevolent Heretic

He asked for "heavier penalties on those involved with the drug trade"


He's talking about drug cartels. Here's the full quote:



Our drug statutes must put a stronger emphasis and heavier penalties on those involved with the drug trade, instead of giving equally harsh sentences to those merely arrested for mere possession or use.


Mike Beebe on the Issues



OTOH - You make some good points



Thanks. You, too.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 06:17 PM
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Marijuana isnt a drug. End of story.

Seems to me like an anti drug politician who knows what's what.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: Benevolent Heretic


In 2003, the governor’s son Kyle Beebe was arrested for possession of marijuana “with intent to deliver”, and was later convicted for the offense, but avoided jail time by completing 3 years of probation and paying over a thousand dollars in fines.




a reply to: Eunuchorn

Correct, cannabis is a beneficial herb with medicinal qualities, not a drug.




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