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Rosetta square outlet ?

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posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 04:25 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
Whose brainstorm idea was it to descend "freefalll" onto a comet shaped like an anvil?


No one knew what shape the comet was until Rosetta arrived, so out of a 10 year trip it was only a few months ago the shape became apparent. It's not really relevant though, as the current issue has nothing to do with it's shape in that respect.


originally posted by: cado angelus
a reply to: intrptr

Have you seen Dr Matt Parker? The dude is awesome...

I think he did a damned good job.

I'd have missed the comet altogether.



If you mean Matt Taylor yes he is! But to give credit where it's due for flying the spacecraft you have Spacecraft Operations Manager Andrea Accomazzo and the Flight Dynamics team.




posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 08:00 AM
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a reply to: CosmicAnomaly


No one knew what shape the comet was until Rosetta arrived, so out of a 10 year trip it was only a few months ago the shape became apparent.

Thank you for the revelation. I stand corrected. They couldn't define the shape because the gas and dust in the coma blocked the view?



posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 08:12 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

It would block the view, but the main issue is there just aren't any ground or space based telescopes able to resolve a comet nucleus that far away. It's really quite small relatively speaking. Clear images of cometary nuclei are taken by probes which can get close enough.

This is what 67P looked like through the VLT only a couple of months ago with it is already a lot closer than when discovered and even when Rosetta launched 10 years ago.

blogs.esa.int...

Don't forget also that 67P was not the original target but a launch delay meant the original target comet was no longer reachable, though like any comet that could not be resolved either so that fact is actually irrelevant after mentioning it.



posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 08:30 AM
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a reply to: 0bserver1

From all the previous data I had heard about the formation of objects in space, I was expecting to see a "conglomeration" of rocks and maybe some ice fields.

I am surprised to notice the "layered strata" in the lower left part of the picture. I realize this could be because of the material building up this way over the countless time involved, but I find it interesting to see such features.



posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

I find all this a big achievement to land in free fall on a comet this size..that it's even possible to do such thing amazes me..
whatever this picture shows is ofcourse a mystery until closer look at the comet . But did the satellite took this picture or did the lander do that .. ?



posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 08:49 AM
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a reply to: CosmicAnomaly

Wow, glad to happen upon someone who knows their stuff. Thanks for that read. it was informative.


The central pixel includes the Rosetta spacecraft, presently at comet 67P/C-G, which is too small to be resolved in the image.

The spectra analysis of the coma is charted by now, is there some place I could view that you think?

I am more interested in the mineral aspect of the comets make up. I hope they get a chance to "taste" the comets subsurface composition.

Long way to go to get denied that right before it is due to happen.



posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: 0bserver1


did the satellite took this picture or did the lander do that .. ?

My guess is the satellite but I don't really know. Perhaps CosmicAnomoly could lend their expertise?

Awesome pic, though…



posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 09:30 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

No problem I try :-) I'm not perfect though so I always encourage anyone to learn as much as they can themselves as you never stop. And even the best people make mistakes, sadly I'm not even one of those. :-)

The image is from the NAVCAM on Rosetta, I don't know what the square is to be honest so apart from being able to say it may be a shadow, glitch, etc I can't really offer anything useful on that which is why I haven't talked about it.

Regarding data there are some limited releases, usually visualisations, because everything is subject to a propitiatory period of up to 6 months. I know this may seem unfair to some, but each instrument belongs to a separate team or organisation and they will have put a massive amount of time, money and effort into getting their ideas approved, built and included on the mission. After dedicating their lives and careers, it would not be fair for a 3rd party to reap the rewards of someone else's hard work.

When it is all available I think you may be able to find it here, but don't quote me on that.

www.sciops.esa.int...

Some spectral analysis data that has been released can be found here:

VIRTIS DETECTS WATER AND CARBON DIOXIDE IN COMET’S COMA



posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 10:53 AM
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a reply to: CosmicAnomaly


During this time, VIRTIS will continuously map the distribution of carbon dioxide and water, as well as that of other minor species including carbon monoxide (CO), methanol (CH3OH), methane (CH4), formaldehyde (CH2O), and hydrocarbons such as acetylene (C2H2), and ethane (C2H6).

There are exciting times ahead as the icy treasure chest starts to give up its secrets.


Too cool. Don't sell yourself short. You corrected my ignorance, for one. Its nice to have some intel and good reads about it. And at least you were nice about proprietary concerns… in the past others have scolded me with, "What business is it of yours"?

I know they want to mine these bodies if possible and that funding is behind some of the science. In a past life, I didn't tell others about my best dumpsters either (wink, wink).


In your opi, what is the best update site right now for watching the critical phase of Rosettas power dilemma? Is it the thread here about mission updates, your rosetta blog or some other?

Thanks in advance.



posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Hydrocarbons! Hydrocarbons!!

That's what the oil companies call "fossil fuels".

Does this mean the comit was once part of a planet with dinosaurs???





posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 05:02 PM
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originally posted by: teamcommander
a reply to: intrptr

Hydrocarbons! Hydrocarbons!!

That's what the oil companies call "fossil fuels".

Does this mean the comit was once part of a planet with dinosaurs???



Okay, lol. Except of course these frozen volatiles aren't being detected as "crude oil" anywhere that I know of. Rather only component parts of what makes up "fossil fuels" here on earth. You could deny my ignorance about that…




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