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Philae has landed.

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posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 06:12 PM
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a reply to: WanderingSage

Oh boy





posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful
Awesome.... So how does that change anything on planet Earth where we live?



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 06:26 PM
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a reply to: WanderingSage

It could, in many ways.

Most comets are thought to be the "left overs" of the formation of our solar system. It's quite possible that frozen inside material of comets may be molecular compounds or even simple organisms that resulted in life here on Earth.

Better understand of comets (and other bodies in our solar system) can help us understand better what we may end up having to do one day: keep one from impacting our planet and snuffing out a lot of (or all of) life here on Earth.

There is a reason why we call everything that orbits our sun the Solar System. In a system, everything has an influence on everything else. Basic middle school science teaches that. My youngest son just learned about that in his science class.



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 06:33 PM
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a reply to: eriktheawful

Don't insult my intelligence. What about the systems here on Earth that have a REAL impact today right now. So a spec of organism from billions of years ago is going to change the Earth. Here I thought trying to save our planet would make a difference, but my mistake understanding a comet will save Earth one day maybe.



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 06:49 PM
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a reply to: WanderingSage

No one (as far as I know) is insulting your intelligence.

We could turn our eyes from the skies, stop all space exploration and all scientific discoveries and concentrate only the the Earth.

Except of course there are a few problems with that:

1) The sun has a major impact on the Earth. It's what drives our climate and can have very real effects on our magnetic field around the Earth. It also is what helps produce ozone. The best way to observe and watch the sun is from space craft not only in Earth orbit but in orbit around the sun itself. Something that we have now, and would not have been possible were it not for previous space exploration that helped develop the technology that is used today to study the sun.

2) As I mentioned, an impactor has the capability to completely wipe out all life on our planet here. Without space exploration to understand other bodies out in space that could possibly impact our planet, we won't know how to deal with it, and instead would have to make a guess. A guess which could make things horribly worse. Not too long ago, we though all asteroids were the same basically: big chucks of metal and rock. Turns out, the answer is no. There are many different kinds out there, and depending on what kind might threaten us may determine how we deal with it.
We only know this because we went out there and actually have studied them with things other than ground based instruments (orbital probes and space probes).

3) Technology. Like that cell phone? Like the internet? Like how we track storms and weather patterns, ocean currents, and are even able to accurately measure how fast the Earth's plates are moving? You can thank space exploration for those things too.

Again: there is no reason why humankind can not multitask. We can do all that you wish for the Earth, and still be exploring space too. Considering that our rocky home is whizzing around the sun in space at 67,000 Mph, understand what is out there and what things are made of and how they behave is important.

You're home just isn't the planet you're walking around on. Your home includes a star, several planets, and many other objects that orbit that star.



posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 07:07 AM
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originally posted by: WanderingSage
a reply to: yorkshirelad

Why don't we expand our knowledge to create less pollution? Or on getting more eco friendly homes more cost efficient. Or helping more people with medical problems. There's a lot of knowledge we could gain that would help the human race right here on Earth. Not saying this isn't cool or anything or a milestone in space exploration, but I think we need to get our ducks in a row here on Earth before we expand. Just not a lot of practical use.



It's all interconnected. The technology you create to go to and land on a comet creates spinoffs that can ultimately find applications on earth. The Apollo program had lots of them, that resulted in practical applications in multiple fields. By doing something so difficult, we are increasing our general knowledge base and that can almost always be applied for practical use on Earth. And considering we spend far more money in buying pizza, going to casinos and then the treatment of gambling addiction than both the NASA and ESA budgets combined, it's money well spent.
edit on 14-11-2014 by openminded2011 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 08:37 AM
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originally posted by: eriktheawful
a reply to: WanderingSage

No one (as far as I know) is insulting your intelligence.

We could turn our eyes from the skies, stop all space exploration and all scientific discoveries and concentrate only the the Earth.

Except of course there are a few problems with that:

1) The sun has a major impact on the Earth. It's what drives our climate and can have very real effects on our magnetic field around the Earth. It also is what helps produce ozone. The best way to observe and watch the sun is from space craft not only in Earth orbit but in orbit around the sun itself. Something that we have now, and would not have been possible were it not for previous space exploration that helped develop the technology that is used today to study the sun.

2) As I mentioned, an impactor has the capability to completely wipe out all life on our planet here. Without space exploration to understand other bodies out in space that could possibly impact our planet, we won't know how to deal with it, and instead would have to make a guess. A guess which could make things horribly worse. Not too long ago, we though all asteroids were the same basically: big chucks of metal and rock. Turns out, the answer is no. There are many different kinds out there, and depending on what kind might threaten us may determine how we deal with it.
We only know this because we went out there and actually have studied them with things other than ground based instruments (orbital probes and space probes).

3) Technology. Like that cell phone? Like the internet? Like how we track storms and weather patterns, ocean currents, and are even able to accurately measure how fast the Earth's plates are moving? You can thank space exploration for those things too.

Again: there is no reason why humankind can not multitask. We can do all that you wish for the Earth, and still be exploring space too. Considering that our rocky home is whizzing around the sun in space at 67,000 Mph, understand what is out there and what things are made of and how they behave is important.

You're home just isn't the planet you're walking around on. Your home includes a star, several planets, and many other objects that orbit that star.



I harken back to the Global Warming crisis everyone falls all over and use that to try and get people to see this very same idea.

People are so hell bent on 'fixing' global warming, and i find THAT to be a waste of time, money, and resources. If we solve 'Global Warming', how do we fix the Super Volcano that explodes 30 years afterwards? How do we stop the asteroid dead set on earth in a (hypothetical) 50 years? Ask the dinosaurs about not paying attention to the celestial harm that is statistically going to effect us one day. To me we shouldnt be wasting our precious time and resources on fixing one problem that only delays the inevitable.


The real problem we need to focus on is this species survival beyond an earth shattering extinction level event. That could happen in many forms, not just a warming of our planet (which we could easily adapt to over any other cataclysmic situation), and that is what we should be focused on, and what these little tests do. Now we know how to maneuver and land on fast moving small objects if need be to do a repair on a ship or catch a free ride to somewhere else in space. The applications from this are many, and DOES effect our future.

If you cant see that, then I suggest you read up a little and learn how truly vast and dangerous space is, and how precious our moments are here on earth. We werent always here, and we wont always be here. Thats one essential fact of our species, this ecosystem, that is in this brief moment able to accommodate us, will come to an end, and I would hope we would prepare enough for our children and grandchildren to have the opportunity to at least live and try to make the world they live on a better place. Whether it be here or among the stars.



posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 11:21 AM
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a reply to: samkent

How so? Those are all things that were invented to solve the problems man faced in getting to the moon.

It may well have happened without the space race but certainly not at anything like that pace as unless a problem is set you cannot find the solution.
--

As for the immediate impact on Earth - well until a few years back Europe was busy waging war on itself, this landing demonstrates what we can accomplish when we cooperate. It's a bit like questioning what was the point of discovering the wheel or fire.

edit on 14-11-2014 by bastion because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 14 2014 @ 05:56 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: rebelv

originally posted by: Hellhound604
here is the first (UNCONFIRMED) pic of the surface as taken by Philae.

Apparently it bounced 3 times over 2 hours before coming to a rest...



I thought Comets were supposed to be made out of Ice.
Is that Ice?


Comets are believed to be made of dust and ice, but the ratios may vary from comet to comet. Some are dirty iceballs, and some are icy dirtballs.

Dirty ice may be hard to distinguish visually from rock. For example, the rocks boulders in this picture of Saturn's moon Titan taken by the Huygens lander are most likely water-ice boulders, but mixed with other stuff:



Source:
Titan Rocks of Ice



Okay, thanks for that. I think this landing is very interesting.

I wonder if they'll find any micro-organisms.

Would suddenly make the book The Andromeda Strain
that much more real.

Rebel 5



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 06:32 AM
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www.cnn.com...

HILARIOUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! So much for discovery!!!!! Useless endeavor!!!!! Let's try again and spend 10x more money than last time

Seems like a really expensive way to check your math.
edit on 15-11-2014 by WanderingSage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 06:48 AM
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a reply to: WanderingSage
the problem is flat earthers cried about nuclear power being used so we stuck thing to align solar panels in addition to landing on a comet...
That's the real shame



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 06:56 AM
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a reply to: Xeven

Seriously that was the only problem? Man let's find someone to blame. Oh I know let's blame people against nuclear power.



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 07:09 AM
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a reply to: WanderingSageLet's blame the apes.



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 08:40 AM
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a reply to: WanderingSage

Eh? The reason it's currently in Idle Mode is because we discovered the comet was bouncy instead of the ice and dust expected - it's transmitted all the data it has so far collected including full lab analysis of the make-up of the comet, there's still loads of data to sift through while it recharges its batteries and starts retransmitting again in a few days.

How something can be called a waste of time and money after having completed all it's tasks and having traveled 6.4Bn miles to land within a couple of metres of the intended destination makes no sense whatsoever.
edit on 15-11-2014 by bastion because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 11:03 AM
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a reply to: bastion

(CNN) -- After an improbable 10-year, 310-million-mile journey to become the first ever space vehicle to make a soft landing on a comet, the Philae probe may have ended its mission prematurely.

Its batteries have run down, said the European Space Agency.

"Philae has fallen into 'idle mode' for a potentially long silence. In this mode, all instruments and most systems on board are shut down," ESA said.

This might not change.

Philae was supposed to transmit data from Comet 67/P for nine months as it passed the sun, running on solar power, but it did not get its place in the sunlight that scientists had hoped for.

It's possible that the conditions may change as the comet moves closer to the sun, making it possible to charge the secondary battery.

Then Philae could awaken from its deep slumber and send data and photo surprises back to Earth, ESA said.

Even with the lander out of commission, the Rosetta orbiter that carried the Philae lander will continue to transmit observations of the comet.


Gonna take a lot longer than a couple days! It landed on a rock, but it landed in a shadow. Get's only 1.5 hours of light a day. So you keep your fingers crossed about a rock and I'll keep my eyes on things that matter more.



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 11:48 AM
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The estimate is a few hours - ESA managed to send the command to rotate the panels so it's getting more than 1.5hrs and it could easily bounce again into a far more sunlit area.

Besides there's still the satellite to land on it anyway, this is just the beginning yet already the mission has completed the following.

1) First ever soft landing on a comet
2) First ever images of a comets surface
3) First ever lab analysis of a comet

All that and more for half the price of a chocolate bar per person in Europe.

It's not a rock, just because you don't understand the importance of the mission doesn't mean it isn't important.
edit on 15-11-2014 by bastion because: (no reason given)

edit on 15-11-2014 by bastion because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 12:07 PM
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This thread is featuring on ATS Live tonight!

www.abovetopsecret.com...

edit on 15-11-2014 by zazzafrazz because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: bastion

It's a rock, don't make it seem grander than it is. I say we should try and blow it up to see how easy it is to take down. That would be far more useful.


www.youtube.com...

edit on 15-11-2014 by WanderingSage because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 08:29 PM
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a reply to: WanderingSage

Please look up the definition of rock - this is not a rock, there is nothing rock like about it apart from appearances. This is a comet that has been hurtling through space for billions of years. It way well hold the key to life on Earth if the water isotopes match - this isn't the trivial exercise you seem to think it is.

Why would that be useful? Every comet has a different composition and weak points. Besides, that data can be extrapolated from the samples already taken.

Cheers for the heads up on the film, never heard of it before but looks very funny.
edit on 15-11-2014 by bastion because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 10:39 PM
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originally posted by: WanderingSage
www.cnn.com...

HILARIOUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! So much for discovery!!!!! Useless endeavor!!!!! Let's try again and spend 10x more money than last time

Seems like a really expensive way to check your math.

You cite a MSM article to pronounce a final verdict. Hilarious!

Why not head to the ESA blog, where things are told more coherently and completely? www.esa.int...

Philae lander completed its main mission and returned a plethora of data that will be examined in the coming days, weeks, months. All of its scientific instruments were activated, even the sample penetrator and the Alpha-X-ray-Spectrometer (APXS). twitter.com...

And, of course, there's still the main Rosetta spacecraft, which is still orbiting the comet, still being in good "health", and still has a lot of work to do in the name of science.

In-detail discussion about the Rosetta mission in general, and Philae lander in particular, can be found at the Unmanned Spaceflight Forum.


originally posted by: WanderingSage
a reply to: bastion

It's a rock, don't make it seem grander than it is.

I wonder, how does a rock have the density of 0.4 g/cm³, which is lower than ice and only somewhat higher than cork?

~~~

"Deny ignorance"
edit on 15-11-2014 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



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