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Sulfur Hexafluoride

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posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 03:19 AM
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Well , i found this quite amusing ...

i was aware of the gas effect when breathing it in , however i was not aware of the effect the gas had on electricity


i found this educational and entertaining !

hope you enjoy it !

Walsh





posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 03:47 AM
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SF6 is what has made small size EHV switchgear possible. Compared to the massive outdoor airblast type circuit breakers that used to be the norm, the CBs and isolators are miniscule.

The byproducts of an arc through SF6 are quite carcinogenic and to be strictly avoided I'm told.

Sulphur Hexaflouride (SF6)
Its major use is as a dielectric (insulator)
edit on 12/11/2014 by Pilgrum because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 03:54 AM
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originally posted by: Pilgrum
SF6 is what has made small size EHV switchgear possible. Compared to the massive outdoor airblast type circuit breakers that used to be the norm, the CBs and isolators are miniscule.

The byproducts of an arc through SF6 are quite carcinogenic and to be strictly avoided I'm told.



lol , no idea what your talking about ..but it sounds rad !




posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 11:21 AM
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a reply to: Walsh

When they came back from break, they were all dead on the studio floor. True story.

Was the audio guy huffing it too? Sounds like there was only one lav working among the bunch of them. And how many people do you need on a morning show, anyway?



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 01:06 PM
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Dumbing down of the public. Inert? Everything has some effect on everyone. Maybe it does not cause any health issues for ninety nine percent of people, maybe they aren't actually laughing because of the voice change.



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 11:18 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

It is a very inert and dense gas which makes it so very suitable under pressure for insulation purposes. The only real risk inhaling the pure gas is that it displaces oxygen in your lungs and could very easily suffocate the unwary the same way CO2 does but even more effectively. Under the most extreme conditions, such as a 100000A+ arc it's quenching under a fault trip in a circuit breaker, it can and does produce nasty byproducts like highly toxic phosgene gas and carcinogenic compounds. It's very widely used in modern HV switchgear for reasons of scale compared the old oil or air blast behemoths it's replacing and I haven't heard of any incidents with it so far. The SF6 breakers are very simple in design with the contacts in a pressurised enclosure and a simple spring close & trip operation (motor winds up the closing spring and closing charges the trip spring)

I personally wouldn't breathe the stuff no matter how pristine it's claimed to be.

edit on 12/11/2014 by Pilgrum because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 11:28 PM
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a reply to: Pilgrum

You won't catch me huffing that stuff either. I look at it this way, if it is heavier than air it will be trapped in the lungs till you stand on your head.

Being that it interferes with electricity, it would also possibly interfere with the signals in our bodies. That is probably how it interferes with speach. Now, it doesn't seem wise to be breathing that stuff.

I suppose if people want to follow the leader as in the video, it is their choice. Cinnamon is safe, but I wouldn't want to do a cinnamon challenge and try swallowing a tablespoon of it. Everything has special properties that interacts with us biochemically. Some is good for us others is bad. Timing is important as is moderation.



posted on Nov, 21 2014 @ 02:05 AM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
a reply to: Pilgrum

Being that it interferes with electricity, it would also possibly interfere with the signals in our bodies. That is probably how it interferes with speach.


It is much denser than air so it makes your vocal cords vibrate slower, reducing the pitch of your voice.



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