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Rosetta Comet Landing: LIVE-Stream, Countdown & Mission Updates

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posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 03:30 AM
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a reply to: boymonkey74

Nice \o/




posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 03:54 AM
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On Dutch news...

ESA : it landed 3 times and the thruster which should push it to the surface did not work.



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 04:29 AM
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a reply to: boymonkey74

They said in the livestream yesterday, that Philaes mass on the comet is about 1gramm. Wikipedia says that Phileas mass is 97,9kilogramm on earth. So the gravity on the comet should be about 1/100 000 of earths gravity.
I did calculate it with given 1gramm for mass on comet, 97,9kg for mass on earth and 9,81m/s^2 for gravity on earth and got 0,0001002m/s^2 as result for the gravity of Philae.

Best regards from probably the newest member of ats atm :-)



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 04:39 AM
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a reply to: 1muzzle

Great first post dude and welcome
.



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 05:00 AM
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Blimey how lucky was the probe to survive 3 bounces and still come to rest in a secure location,without its anchors?
Lets hope the drill doesn't push the lander away from the surface when it starts up.

Well done ESA!




posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 05:17 AM
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a reply to: Silcone Synapse

Gee, we finally got it: FIRST SURFACE IMAGE IS IN !!!
Source

I'm quite excited after Philae's bumpy "triple-bounce" ride ... can't wait to see the first panorama!!



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 05:29 AM
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a reply to: jeep3r
Awesome stuff!
Glad the camera has survived all that bouncing about.
They should be able to determine more about the position its come to rest once they get a panoramic image,hopefully by this evening.




posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 05:56 AM
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a reply to: Silcone Synapse

Yes, I hope it's not tilted/flipped over ... keeping my fingers crossed! For now, it's just fantastic that Philae made it down to it's new home address, anchors deployed or not, tilted or not!



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 06:04 AM
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a reply to: martinkb

Great Images!

Thanks for sharing.



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 06:15 AM
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There is a media briefing today at 13:00 UTC (8:00 am U.S. Eastern Standard time) -- which is in about 45 minutes of this posting.

rosetta.esa.int...



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 06:15 AM
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originally posted by: jeep3r
a reply to: Silcone Synapse

Gee, we finally got it: FIRST SURFACE IMAGE IS IN !!!
Source


And here goes ESA's visualization (or: best guess) regarding what happened during landing:

Source



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 06:43 AM
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Heh, kind of hard to land something that is the size of a washing machine, but on that comet, only weighs something like 0.05 ounces!

I want to hear more about why the harpoons failed to anchor. Did they fail to puncture the surface? Or was the area it was in too much like loose gravel and they sank in and slipped right back out?



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 07:00 AM
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originally posted by: eriktheawful
I want to hear more about why the harpoons failed to anchor. Did they fail to puncture the surface? Or was the area it was in too much like loose gravel and they sank in and slipped right back out?


That's what I'm curious to hear, also.

The lander's feet also have screws that are supposed to help anchor it. Did the harpoons fail to fire, or is the surface material just so loose (maybe like powdered snow) that the harpoons -- and the screws in the feet for that matter -- didn't have anything to grab.

Hopefully we will find out in the press conference coming up in a few minutes.




edit on 11/13/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 07:01 AM
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Probably a stupid question but here goes, what is actually keeping it on the surface of 67p? How have they stabilised it, hopefully they'll clear that up in a min.



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 07:04 AM
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originally posted by: MrBergstrom
Probably a stupid question but here goes, what is actually keeping it on the surface of 67p? How have they stabilised it, hopefully they'll clear that up in a min.


The comet has enough gravity to hold the craft there (i.e., to prevent the lander from drifting away) -- albeit the gravity is very slight.


edit on 11/13/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 07:09 AM
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Media briefing is live now!

rosetta.esa.int...
edit on 13-11-2014 by 1muzzle because: Link



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 07:26 AM
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Hmm. Did he say that some sides of the lander may be in permanent shadow? That may be bad news for recharging of batteries.



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 07:26 AM
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Two feet on the surface, one in open space! Amazing!

Don't like all this permanent shadow talk though :/



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 07:34 AM
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I wonder if they could reconstruct the location of the lander on when the Rosetta orbiter loses contact with it.

What I mean is that I suppose if you build up enough data points of when they lose contact/regain contact that you could map out the possible places that it could be, considering communication contact generally requires line of sight. The more times you lose and regain contact, the more places you could rule out.



edit on 11/13/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 07:41 AM
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Good idea Soylent, it must be so exciting trying to work it out where it has landed!



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