It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Man's Wedding Ring Gets Him Killed

page: 2
9
<< 1   >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 11 2014 @ 07:08 PM
link   
a reply to: silo13

A ring can be dangerous even without machinery or electricity.

A friend of mine found himself locked in a toilet at a party.
After yelling and banging for what seemed an eternity, he decided to climb out the window. ( forgot about auto-censor: glazed opening in the wall LOL! )

After removing the flyscreen, he climbed up and jumped.
His wedding ring caught the aluminium window frame which it sliced like a can-opener; leaving him hanging by a badly mangled finger.

Surgery was required, he no longer wears a ring.


edit on 11-11-2014 by Timely because: stupid autocensor




posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 07:39 AM
link   
a reply to: Grovit

There are horror stories of people who wear tungsten rings, the problem is the medical people cant cut them off if they need too. My brother one time was messing around with black powder, and chucking some into a fire, like an idiot. The fire jumped straight to the can of blackpowder in his hand, It blew up. Luckily he still has his hand, the problem was cutting the ring off with a crispy burnt hand. lets just say they had to rip his ring over his burnt flesh, to get the tungsten ring off, they couldnt cut tungsten.



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 07:44 AM
link   
a reply to: Glassbender777

i got my left hand ripped up in a saw...i lost my ring finger when i had the ring on...all that was left of my finger is a little nub....the ring was still on in the er and i had to for lack of a better word yank it off.
my finger was shredded and bleeding....lots of pain and then i had to do that.
sucked



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 08:12 AM
link   

originally posted by: Glassbender777
a reply to: Grovit

There are horror stories of people who wear tungsten rings, the problem is the medical people cant cut them off if they need too. My brother one time was messing around with black powder, and chucking some into a fire, like an idiot. The fire jumped straight to the can of blackpowder in his hand, It blew up. Luckily he still has his hand, the problem was cutting the ring off with a crispy burnt hand. lets just say they had to rip his ring over his burnt flesh, to get the tungsten ring off, they couldnt cut tungsten.


As a jeweler I have cut my fair share of rings off. You have to "crack" tungsten to get it off. Not something I'd wear even though I sell them.



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 08:24 AM
link   
no jewelry worn on the exposed part of the body when working on any repair or machinery environment.
that was one of the very first things learned in my education in being a cabinet maker, mechanic, and industrial repair technician. my wedding ring is on a chain around my neck and i carry a pocket watch, and my phone is in my tool box.

have seen many a person with nubs for fingers, dried up withered arms, hands who didn't take that lesson to heart, i guess they didn't see the safety films in class.



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 08:35 AM
link   
are RCD's used in US wiring installations? over here now all new wiring installs have to be RCD protected by 30Ms trips for pretty much everything in a domestic setup and they're very sensitive and might of worked to of save the guys life, having worked on large scale things like old fashioned mainframes theres a general rule no jewellery and no ties when working near anything unless you know its safe (aka still in its box)



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 09:37 AM
link   
a reply to: silo13

Uhhhmm. Pretty sure he would have been electrocuted if his bare finger had touched a copper wire, too.

"Man reaching behind a dishwasher without knowing that there are live electrical wires back there gets him killed."



edit on 12-11-2014 by ScientiaFortisDefendit because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 11:54 AM
link   
a reply to: ScientiaFortisDefendit

not so, i knew a fella that got across 440 volts changing out a starter. it cooked one of his arms down to the bone and half his shoulder on one side, and three fingers on the other, and blew a chunk out of his leg. he lived and deid from cancer 40 years later.

ETA: once in our shop we had a guy grab 220 volts in both hands, he stay in circuts for at least 30 seconds before we got the quick disconnect turn off and he lived.

the word can mean injure or kill.

from the oxford dictionary.



electrocute [ iˈlektrəˌkyo͞ot ] verb verb: electrocute · third person present: electrocutes · past tense: electrocuted · pas…
1.injure or kill someone by electric shock: "a man was electrocuted when he switched on the Christmas tree lights"
2.execute (a convicted criminal) by means of the electric chair.
Powered by OxfordDictionaries · © Oxford University Press


most electricians i know say electrified, we use to say lit up until we started hearing soldiers using the term.





edit on 12-11-2014 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)



edit on 12-11-2014 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 11:59 AM
link   

originally posted by: hounddoghowlie
a reply to: ScientiaFortisDefendit

not so, i knew a fella that got across 440 volts changing out a starter. it cooked one of his arms down to the bone and half his shoulder on one side, and three fingers on the other, and blew a chunk out of his leg. he lived and deid from cancer 40 years later.



Good for him. Has nothing to do with this story, though. My point (which you apparently missed) is that skin is not an electrical insulator. He would have gotten electrocuted regardless of whether he was wearing a ring. Unless they left out a key part of the story, like maybe the ring welded to the wire and he couldn't get his hand out, allowing the electricity to course through his body for 20 minutes. But there was nothing like that in the story.



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 12:00 PM
link   
I have been griping with my superiors who ask me to take off my wedding band. I am a cook and apparently there is risk of it getting caught in some of the machinery we use. This adds some food for thought....



posted on Nov, 12 2014 @ 12:05 PM
link   
Although I do not wish to endorse wearing rings at work I used to wear a titanium ring and it saved my finger from a good crushing when a heavy peice of machinery fell on my hand.

a reply to: Bluesma



new topics

top topics



 
9
<< 1   >>

log in

join