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Australia, the Commonwealth and America

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posted on Dec, 10 2004 @ 10:58 AM
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Bodrul's thread got me thinking, so I'm starting this thread to spark some discussion on the possibility of the UK siding more with the EU, putting ties with the US at risk and the implications of this on other commonwealth countries such as Australia who is allied with the US. I really don't know what would happen, and it has really got me interested.

If the UK reduced ties with the US in favour of an EU/France (+ China?) alliance, where would Australia and other commonwealth countries stand as both allies of America and commonwealth countries under the monarchy?

Don't post any "It'll never happen" please.




posted on Dec, 10 2004 @ 09:46 PM
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For a long time the Commonwealth has ceased to be a framework for foreign relations. Politicians might talk about it often, but it has no real political meaning. I think you will find that many of the good relations within the commonwealth between nations, are exactly that, RELATIONS BETWEEN NATIONS. The commonwealth can hardly be talked of as some type of treaty or alliance. The commonwealth as a political grouping is DEAD...

Our largest trade partners aren't part of the Commonwealth, Japan, China and the US.

www.dfat.gov.au...



posted on Dec, 10 2004 @ 11:59 PM
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I agree that the Commonwealth as a political grouping is dead. Assuming that both NZ & Aust become republics in the future the monarchy will matter less then it dose now.
Aust & NZ will seek closer political ties. Where dose the USA fit into the picture?
Well Aust is already has close ties with the USA I assume NZ would also seek closer ties without upseting China. The USA is or will want to keep china in check.



posted on Dec, 11 2004 @ 01:41 AM
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One thing we must remember is that John Howard is a pretty strict Monarchist, as is Alexander Downer (duh...). But while this hypothesis is not really something to be considered for the short term, we must therefore remember that Tim Costello (possible replacement for PM if Howard retires mid-term plus given that the Liberal party may win the next election) is supportive of Australia becoming a republic. I would like to see Australia become a republic on one hand, but I also feel a kinship to the other commonwealth countries that would appear to break (symbolically) if a republic were to take place.

I agree that the Commonwealth doesn't really hold politically. But it is still a strong network and bond between the involved countries. Particularly the main ones. From what I have seen, in Australia at least, the commonwealth still very much feels like family. And although there is no real political influence (some would disagree) the bond is still very strong among the people.



posted on Dec, 11 2004 @ 02:03 AM
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but I also feel a kinship to the other commonwealth countries that would appear to break (symbolically) if a republic were to take place.

I know what you mean I love to watch Australia
top the medal tally at the Commonwealth games.



posted on Dec, 11 2004 @ 01:28 PM
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I dont think that we will lose our commemwealth bonds.
The RN and parts of the commonwealths military forces just done an exercise together and they preformed fantastically.



posted on Dec, 11 2004 @ 01:44 PM
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Have to agree with DW. We feel a kinship with Commonwealth nations, probably because we were all birthed from the Empire.



posted on Dec, 11 2004 @ 09:30 PM
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Originally posted by devilwasp
I dont think that we will lose our commemwealth bonds.
The RN and parts of the commonwealths military forces just done an exercise together and they preformed fantastically.


Culturally and historically we haven't much choice, our nations were borne of the British Empire. Although our poltical and economic systems may be simillar (if not exactly the same), for decades we have moved in seperate directions, and we will continue to move in different directions.

Of all the political and economic possiblities the least likely is that ties between Commonwealth nations will remain strong. Whether or not Great Britain gravitates towards the US or EU, or whether Australia establishes closer links to Asia, or remains a US puppet-state. The Commonwealth will become nothing more than an acknowledgement of our shared heritage ( how "shared" it is is up for debate though).



posted on Dec, 12 2004 @ 04:12 PM
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Originally posted by Volksgeist

Culturally and historically we haven't much choice, our nations were borne of the British Empire. Although our poltical and economic systems may be simillar (if not exactly the same), for decades we have moved in seperate directions, and we will continue to move in different directions.

Yeah but i believe we as a whole will keep our ties with each other.


Of all the political and economic possiblities the least likely is that ties between Commonwealth nations will remain strong. Whether or not Great Britain gravitates towards the US or EU, or whether Australia establishes closer links to Asia, or remains a US puppet-state. The Commonwealth will become nothing more than an acknowledgement of our shared heritage ( how "shared" it is is up for debate though).

I dont believe so, we have many treaties with each other about protecting each other and i believe it would be a good idea to try and improve links with the commonwealth.
If anything we need more allies and frankly in a time like this allies are a rare find.



posted on Jan, 14 2005 @ 03:47 AM
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the thought of a united Eurasia is so utterly profound to me! if only.

as for the Commonwealth, i'm sure there would be implications if the British lost their monarchy as head of state.
i believe the principle of the Commonwealth will stay unchanged, and one would hope they stick together in their inherent interests (the key declarations), exogenous 'unions' aside. but with most things, only time will tell.



posted on Jan, 14 2005 @ 09:21 AM
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Originally posted by BLUELol
the thought of a united Eurasia is so utterly profound to me! if only.


- That may come eventually, if we want it enough.
I've seen this talked about before, interesting concept.


as for the Commonwealth, i'm sure there would be implications if the British lost their monarchy as head of state.


- Oh no doubt, absolutely. But for all that we don't actually need a Monarchy to tie it all together.
Our history together has already seen to that.


i believe the principle of the Commonwealth will stay unchanged, and one would hope they stick together in their inherent interests (the key declarations), exogenous 'unions' aside. but with most things, only time will tell.


- I cannot see any reason to think otherwise.

I have been interested in this idea of a closeness between Aus and the USA.....or NZ and the US for that matter.

I'm mindful that Aus has been with the US in Vietnam previously (although hardly a fond memory to many Austrailians that one) and in the current Iraqi situation but I have never met an Aussie who spoke especially warmly or fondly of the US.
Certainly I've never met an Aussie who saw their links to the US in anything like the terms your average Brit might describe British links to the US.
I always thought the Aussies had a more mature, slightly cooler, relationship with the US.
Has something changed I've missed?



posted on Jan, 16 2005 @ 03:07 AM
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These points are all good. And I'm glad it has come around the the US relationship. Australians have a history (somewhat) of disdain for authority, particularly British. Generally you can look into the story of Breaker Morant and other such cases of Australian soldiers telling British officers where to stick it. Now this was a long time ago and does not exist at all anymore, but the attitude is still there I think. I believe Australians are pissed off by what appears to be an unquestioning adherance to US policy by our current government. We have always been a good ally to the US since WW2 but I think many Australians are sick of seeing what appears to be us helping them out and no visible favours returned. The US free trade agreement came into effect very recently and as was broadcast over the media last year, we seem to have been shafted in several areas and this also pisses people off. Maybe it is the fiercely independent attitude of Australia that has people edgy about the US. I have rambled here, if you dont agree with something Ive said I'd be glad to read your thoughts. Hope it has further sparked some discussion.



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