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Camera survives a failed rocket launch test.

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posted on Nov, 10 2014 @ 12:19 PM
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First, mods I did not know where to put this, but since its tech well ....
If its the wrong forum please move.

Now on to topic:

Just a little treat in the form of a GoPro camera surviving a failed rocket launch test ..in slow motion
It was pretty captivating for me, so I hope You like it .. I suggest watching in HD and waiting until the end.



PS: What are those cams made of, adamantium ?

edit on 10/11/14 by Thill because: (no reason given)

edit on 10/11/14 by Thill because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 10 2014 @ 01:09 PM
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a reply to: Thill
Wow.
What does it take to kill one of those?



posted on Nov, 10 2014 @ 01:49 PM
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And I thought the bear eating one was cool. This tops that!!!
Great find op



posted on Nov, 10 2014 @ 02:06 PM
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One of the comments mentioned how dramatically fitting the howling/crying sound was (17 secs.).

Below is a quote from the autopsy page about the cause of the fire (translated from Danish)...


The results of the autopsy are consistent with a scenario in which the engine compartment had a leak of fuel already in the pre-stage due. An injured packaging, fuel pre-stage valve. As the pressure increased nominally at the start of the main-stage, did undersized spacers between the cooling jacket inner and outer wall and poor and undersized welds that cooling jacket burst open. Fuel ran out into the open air without passing through the combustion chamber, while the LOX / GOX unreacted ran out through the nozzle. Both contributed to the outer fire, which in turn ignited the fuel which escaped through the hatches from the engine compartment. Setbacks through hatches created a secondary fire in the engine compartment. We could not detect leakage of LOX system.

goo.gl...




edit on 10-11-2014 by Murgatroid because: I felt like it..



posted on Nov, 10 2014 @ 03:55 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Nov, 10 2014 @ 04:09 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: Thill
Wow.
What does it take to kill one of those?



I was wondering the same thing, then I wondered if it would survive a close up with a volcano
? I guess that would have been to much, but never the less those are some thought gizmos there


I wonder if somebody could enlighten me what the temperature of that exhaust is ? I see from Murgatroid's link above that it would have been between 660 C and 1000 C.
edit on 10/11/14 by Thill because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 10 2014 @ 07:50 PM
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This was not a launch test but was a static engine test.

The camera was likely in a armored box with a pyrex glass lens port.



posted on Nov, 10 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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Takes a licking and keeps on clicking (thanks for the ride OP)



posted on Nov, 10 2014 @ 08:11 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Wow is all I can say and what a plug for GoPro I knew they made good products now everyone knows that is insane



posted on Nov, 11 2014 @ 07:58 AM
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A right angled mirror also provides protection against direct impact.
It's all smoke and mirrors



posted on Nov, 11 2014 @ 08:56 AM
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Exactly, just a static engine test, I have some glass, that can withstand temperatures above this. Pyrex glass, so it makes sense that the go pro was inside something with a pyrex glass sheild. The Rocket doesnt even have a nose cone
edit on 11-11-2014 by Glassbender777 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 11 2014 @ 12:51 PM
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originally posted by: samkent
A right angled mirror also provides protection against direct impact.
It's all smoke and mirrors


I don't know to me the video clearly shows the camera detaching from its place of original montage (have you watched the whole movie like I suggested or only the first minute
? ) and coming with direct contact of the fire .. Also at the very end the camera is shown and it looks like it had some decent flame contact ..

Care to elaborate how that happened if it had no contact with the flame because of pyrex glass or mirrors ?

When it comes to the rocket itself, I think from what I understand, from that large document posted in one of the first replies (post accident analysis translated from Danish to English), it looks like this actually was a launch that went sideways, but I might be understanding that wrong so feel free to correct me.
edit on 11/11/14 by Thill because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 09:06 AM
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a reply to: ANNED

Correct on point #1, but picture of camera at the end of the video seems show damage on the camera body with dirt and all kinds of stuff embedded and cooked into it. Apparently they just left the thing out in the open and exposed. However what you and samkent discribe with the use of an external enclosure sounds like the "right" way to do it. (At least it's a time proven approach and also one that I'd follow if I was in charge of things.)



posted on Nov, 15 2014 @ 09:30 AM
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a reply to: Thill

You could see that the rocket was bolted down....the other posters are right about it being a static engine test...nonetheless, it was a pretty remarkable video.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 11:32 AM
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originally posted by: Thill

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: Thill
Wow.
What does it take to kill one of those?



I was wondering the same thing, then I wondered if it would survive a close up with a volcano
? I guess that would have been to much, but never the less those are some thought gizmos there


I wonder if somebody could enlighten me what the temperature of that exhaust is ? I see from Murgatroid's link above that it would have been between 660 C and 1000 C.


It would depend on what it's made. If it was trow inside one it would probably melt over time.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 01:30 PM
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Unobtainium is my guess as to what the camera body is made of, that stuff is so out of this world its unbelievable.



posted on Nov, 16 2014 @ 02:08 PM
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Another ATS misleading thread. No launch, no failure. Tough camera.







 
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