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Conspiracy Theorists- Can you explain this ‘eerie’ job ad?

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posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 10:12 AM
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I used to work in recruitment for high-level positions (aka Executiv Search Consultant), and trust me, there are far easier, quicker and - above all - more inexpensive to completely free ways to collect random resumes. Anyone with a computer and half a brain can pull hundreds of these up in only a week. So whatever that ad is all about, I don't believe they use it to collect meager CVs.




posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 10:13 AM
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This ad may well be legitimate. There are fields of employment that require a certain type of personality, as well as skill set. Employers will often comb through hundreds and thousands of potentials to find just a handful to move to the next phase of the process. From there, few make it to the final phase. And considering each phase is compartmentalized, no applicant knows any more about the job than the phase they made it to. Considering the entry level salary, I'd say not many have made it past e-mailing their resume.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 10:34 AM
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a reply to: Shana91aus

It reminds me of the low men from the Dark Tower series (and some of King's other books). They would communicate with their operatives through lost pet posters and other subtle means. For example, if they were looking for the apprehension of a very tall and quiet Scandinavian man, they would put something like "LOST: GREAT DANE - VERY TIMID - REWARD OFFERED" and then their operatives would know who to look for.

I always thought there was something unsettling about that whole mechanic of how they operated so it is of course interesting to see something that may operate along similar lines in real life.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 10:43 AM
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a reply to: Sublimecraft

I hope you made very specific worded information that you can search for on the internet in the future. It MIGHT be out there somewhere if you search for a specific sentence.

The ad isn't creepy in itself. Creepy that it's been posted for 10 years. Is there any proof it was posted before that or before Google? Hard copy?



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: Sublimecraft

"eerievictim498"



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 11:02 AM
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Looking for the next Presidential Puppet - someone willing to work for an unknown boss, who will sell their soul for a pittance (100K a year, don't ask any questions) and who regards themselves as exceptional compared to all the other azz-kissers out there.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 11:08 AM
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The ad is real.

We usually only hear from people that haven't gotten the job.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 11:11 AM
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Wondering if anyone has actually seen the ads, besides the articles and blog info.

ETA: I've answered ads in the past that seemed as a good deal but had no reply. Later on found that they were sketchy, so it's not far off of a way to gather general info then harass you with telemarketing or other. But why and what are they looking for? As it seems more than just taking down your resume, name, number, name, address, work history, etc. Also, that whomever falls into a demographic may be interested in the position, maybe they do conduct and for interviews for that purpose only. Though, it definitely falls into "too good to be true" as an offer.

edit on 8-11-2014 by dreamingawake because: added more



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 11:36 AM
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It's either a way to get your information to sell to advertisers, or it could very well be legit. Maybe this entrepreneur likes to take a more personal approach to hiring.

My first guess was an MLM scheme, but I'm sure everyone would get a response if that were the case.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 11:51 AM
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Found this blog by goggling the email address. Blog was started in 8/04, last post 5/13.

A few interesting clues but nothing concrete, that I saw. (didn't read it all though)

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edit on 8-11-2014 by MrLimpet because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 11:51 AM
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just to state the obvious - if a person // group // corporation // agency wished to " harvest " personal data

this munkies advice would be - set up or buy out a REAL employment agency - and just data-mine the files

simples



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 12:03 PM
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a reply to: Shana91aus

Curious indeed! I agree with some poster's here that this is one method of Data Farming. The fact that so much has been spent, and probably continues to be spent, is suspect enough for Me to come to that very conclusion. I mean, I doubt if AnyOne would spend that kind of money and expect Nothing out of it in return!!..... Syx.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 12:44 PM
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a reply to: SyxPak

Perhaps its not about data collection, but rather some form of tax evasion...

My tax knowledge is limitted anyone know if theres an explanation in that regard?



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 01:26 PM
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a reply to: Shana91aus

My question is, does the advertisement always appear with the exact same punctuation, the same font, the same alignment of the body of the text?

Is the email response address always the same?

If not, subtle differences between various iterations of the advertisement could potentially be a rudimentary form of covert communication, perhaps to indicate things like pulling operatives in for debriefing, directing them to "go dark", or to execute a pre-existing set of commands.

Or it could be something else entirely, but thats my tin foil hat time done for the day


The possibilities are endless, but I am surprised that no one has gotten wind of who posted the advertisement, and what it is actually for. The other thing I do not understand, is how has it been confirmed that it is definitely bogus? If anyone who successfully applied for the job, was forced to sign an NDA before finalising the terms of their employment, then no one would have ever spoken a word about it. I am just batting things around in my head now, and should probably shut up!



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 02:11 PM
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It's most likely something espionage related - either a recruitment ad, or - probably more likely - updating sleepers with new contact details.

Here in the UK there was a story about MI5 using odd press ads to search for people who 'thought differently' about things. IIRC, the ads simply said 'Waiting for Godot?' and contact details, all listed in just the small ad sections of local papers and suchlike.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 03:10 PM
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I think I have the answer, and I'm not joking even if it seems far fetched. My guess? High-mid bulk level drug dealers are posting this ad and only a certain response results in a transaction. Think about it, they need a way for new clientele to reach them without either knowing any detail about the other. Once a lower level dealer has earned a certain amount of trust he is told how to respond to the ad. When the right message comes in no checks are needed to ensure he's trustworthy, the fact that he knows what to message indicates that. Also it's totally anonymous, even if the cops did get hold of someone who knows the response it won't make a difference, no information would be given, they would just ship the package to a location (most likely contained in the "coded" response). No names, no faces, no wires, and likely no suspicions.

Call me sherlock.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 03:26 PM
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i dont understand how having a cache of resume's would be a benefit in the world of data collection...

resume's dont usually contain ss#'s or dl#'s...i know mine dont...

this probably is not the correct tech term but i think you will know what i mean.

if whoever created this ad did it to collect data from people, wouldnt it be easier/cheaper/faster to just create some sort of program, web crawler type deal to troll facebook, monster, etc etc...

i dont know...i dont see how collecting resume's for 10 years would be of any consequence



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 03:52 PM
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... Wondering if maybe, someone isn't collecting the resume's, changing the names, and having the info serve as some form of fake documents. Would be tough to trace.

If you were posing as another person, having documents backing up your story would be invaluable and arguably expensive to come by depending on what country you are attaining them from.

I imagine a ton of work would otherwise go into creating a convincing resume that had the proper contacts adresses and whatnot. Having a variety of different resumes couldn't hurt either.

Not to suggest it might be something dark...I know documents are even forged for English instructors overseas that lack the credentials, but want to find a way around it. Knew a few friends that taught overseas that used fake diplomas even. Faked resume's would be a bonus in regards to this.

Interesting post. Strange indeed.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 03:58 PM
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I bet an old rich fella is fulfilling his snuff fantasies with this.

Or the devil moved from the crossroad to the digital grounds and is buying souls 100K per year, depending on qualifications of course.



posted on Nov, 8 2014 @ 08:24 PM
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a reply to: Motte

That's exactly what I was thinking!!! that's what makes it even more a mystery too me ! they could easily do this without spending that much money on a single ad for that long!

a reply to: Klassified

Yes there is fields that require certain personalities and I understand that employers like to get in all the resumes they can and thoroughly go through them and only interview candidates they feel will be perfect for the job but for 10 freakin years seriously? that's a hell of a long time to be advertising for one position. What are they doing hiring for when the person in the current position retires in 30 years?



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