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Lakeview Oregon quake swarm.

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posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 05:39 PM
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LAKEVIEW -- A swarm of earthquakes, the biggest a 4.6, has struck for several weeks about 40 miles southeast of Lakeview, Ore. There were two quakes early Wednesday morning, at 3.7 and 3.5 magnitude. The 4.6 magnitude earthquake was late Tuesday evening. A day earlier, there was a 4.1 quake. On Oct. 6, there was 4.1 quake and on Oct. 23, a 2.2 magnitude quake.


www.kgw.com...

I've seen my share of quake swarms, and posted threads about them.
This ongoing swarm is intense!





Last seven days :


earthquake.usgs.gov...

Thoughts?

*did a search for Lakeview and didnt see any mention. Mods delete if already posted.

*Not sure why I say that, the mods delete regardless of whether you ask them to or not. lol

edit on 5-11-2014 by canucks555 because: (no reason given)




posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 06:00 PM
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Nobody at all is reporting on this, although it's no secret either. There is an oddly shallow and very active quake swarm occurring in NW Nevada, about 65 KM ESE of Lakeview, Oregon (as USGS reports it) and it has been going on now for over a week and a half. The area the quakes are occurring in does not seem to have any significant human population, and appears to be mostly mountainous desert, overlain by igneous rocks of what I'm guessing are older than pliestocene. There isn't a lot of info on the area, much less any geological information I'm able to find.


volcanoscience.blogspot.ca...

more:



Looks like the media and geologists are finally taking notice of this quake swarm. So far, indications are that it is purely tectonic, but they don't know yet. The area has a history of tectonic activity, however this swarm appears to be unprecedented for the region. Here are the few reports I could find on this: www.oregonlive.com... www.rgj.com...



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 06:08 PM
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a reply to: canucks555

The only person giving an explaination is YT Channel Dutchsinse over last week or so. The "craton" is being pressed from Alaska toward Yellowstone area.
I am mobile so no embed.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 06:11 PM
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a reply to: Granite




Native Americans may have occupied the area around Lakeview for as much as 14,000 years, as evidenced by artifacts found in the Paisley Caves north of Lakeview.[6][7] When the first white explorers came through the Goose Lake Valley, Shoshone speaking people were living in the area.[8] In 1827, Peter Skene Ogden led a brigade of Hudson's Bay Company trappers through the Goose Lake Valley. He was followed in 1832 by John Work and his trappers. Work noted the hot springs north Goose Lake (now called Hunter's Hot Springs) in his journal. The hot springs are approximately 2 miles (3.2 km) north the Lakeview town site.[9][10]

en.wikipedia.org...

The plot thickens! Damn hot springs!



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 06:17 PM
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a reply to: canucks555

Too long ago...

Dutchsinse's "craton theory" is a modern state-of-art geology lesson.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 06:19 PM
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more wiki (goose Lake Basin) :



The area around the Goose Lake Valley was formed by faulted blocking. There are numerous bounding faults on the west and east side of the valley. The valley itself is an alluvial basin. Its underlying strata were formed by Pliocene and Pleistocene lava flows covered by Holocene sedimentary deposits. It is bounded by Pliocene and Tertiary basalt that form the Fremont and Warner Mountains, and on the south and southwest by Pliocene basalt of the Modoc Plateau.[2] In the Goose Lake area, volcanic rock from the Pliocene is up to 500 feet (150 m) thick. This is topped with additional layers of Pleistocene basalt up to 200 feet (61 m) thick. The upper levels of strata are sedimentary deposits from the Holocene, which are 1,000 feet (300 m) thick in some areas. The upper alluvial layers consist of partially stratified sand and silt mixed with layers of gravel. These deposits are permeable and provide the valley with groundwater. Calcium bicarbonate occurs in the groundwater throughout the basin.[2] The entire valley was once covered by a single vast pluvial lake that may have been 300 feet (91 m) deep during the Pleistocene Epoch. However, during the Holocene Epoch water level gradually receded leaving a large endorheic lake. Today, the lake is known as Goose Lake and is only 24 feet (7.3 m) deep at its deepest point.[3][7][9]


en.wikipedia.org...

Interesting place!
edit on 5-11-2014 by canucks555 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 06:39 PM
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a reply to: canucks555

Stretching maybe? Pulling on the land from the pacific plate? I hope that is not to dumb an idea.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 06:43 PM
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a reply to: Iamschist

No idea is dumb. What I'm getting out of it is that it's hard as hell down there, and hardly seismic. Even the experts are stumped.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 07:56 PM
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No big deal, Oregon is floating on a lake of lava. It's just moving, that's all.

No problem until we fall in and then if we get video, we'll post it on Youtube and get millions of hits!

From Alaska down through to Seattle and Mt. Ranier to Mt. Hood near Portland, and to the California border with Mt. Shasta, it's one volcano after another. Except for Mt. St. Helens which is waking up again, most of them are supposedly 'dormant'.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 08:07 PM
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3.7 mag and 3.8 just since I posted the thread. (The last hour) You'd feel that if you were there in your Winnebago .
9.1 kilometers down, shallow shallow.

*The quakes are actually happening in Nevada(?) That's what it looks like. I believe they're having problems calibrating as there aren't many sensors in that area...




edit on 5-11-2014 by canucks555 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 08:16 PM
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I'm considerably west of there but I haven't felt a damn thing. I'll let you know if the dogs wake up



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 08:34 PM
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a reply to: signalfire

Let me know if the dogs wake up either way. Doesn't matter. Coon, cat, neighbours, Dogs waking up is pretty damn cool in my books.





posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 08:49 PM
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I'm considerably west of there



You sure? Not hard to tell what's wrong with that image and the text on the bottom. They don't have a clue where these things are actually happening.




posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 08:58 PM
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Look at that. Red marker (top pic) is Lakeview.
That 'aint no 50-60 kilometers east / south east of Lakeview. Its hundreds of kilometers off.
edit on 5-11-2014 by canucks555 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 08:59 PM
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When we used to work in the area, I always said the area was active, but everyone kinda pooh-pooh'd me off. I have no clue what is going on or why, but I've a feeling we may soon find out. Hopefully, it's just the area letting off some stress.



posted on Nov, 5 2014 @ 09:39 PM
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The clue in the descriptions was 'hot springs'; that means the lava isn't that far underneath the ground. There's LOTS of hot springs in Oregon, it's a tourist destination thing here.

Way to get friendly with the natives, no clothes needed.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 09:40 AM
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Yeah well they better get some GPS units installed around there to make sure there isn't uplift occurring- and better check for any gas emissions too while they're at it. Because if there is, we might find ourselves with a new ancient, reawakened volcano spewing ash suddenly when the thing blows. And those quakes are covering an area roughly ten miles or more across. So if it is one, that is no small, insignificant volcano.

With that latest 4.7 quake, the stakes are raised a bit. So many of these quakes are big enough to where they could be magma intrusion-generated. Or, looks like most of these are occurring on unmapped, if not unknown faults- which is why it is strange, but it does happen. And apparently there is an old volcanic cone somewhere near there, said an article about the "Sheldon Contiguous Study Area" - and right in southwestern part of it too, where the quakes are mostly occurring.



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 11:20 AM
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a reply to: TrueAmerican

I've been hoping you would make an appearance in here and share your thoughts. Glad you finally made it!



posted on Nov, 6 2014 @ 12:38 PM
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a reply to: canucks555

Noticed the swarm on the UC Berkely earthquake app. Hopefully nothing major comes from it but it will be interesting to watch.



posted on Nov, 13 2014 @ 12:58 AM
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M4.5 - 63km ESE of Lakeview, Oregon

earthquake.usgs.gov...

people felt that one!



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