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Stoa, the Brazilian Carnotaurus.

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posted on Nov, 2 2014 @ 01:40 PM
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You see i'm quite into the Dinossaur cryptid thing. In fact i have been searching quite a bit about them in order to create some articles in another site. Whie searching for more cryptid dinossaurs, things were running quite bad when i finally found about a Cryptid i never heard of. You see, this cryptid was first in 1912, so i will just get the history:




Stoa is a legendary, but not common know cryptid said to live in Brazil inside the Amazonian rain forest around the area of "Serra do Curupira".

The first report of this creature camed around 1920, Lord John was camping with his military squad around a lake next to a village tribe when a group of huge-lizard like animals jumped of a cliff and started to kill the natives by jumping on them.

He described the animal as having the size o a bufallo and being grayish in color. The animals killed almost a hundred of the natives and were immune to bullets acording to John. Two of them died after the natives shoot them with numerous poisoned arrows.In 1978, the witness said that one of the individuals of these species had more than 20ft in lenght.

The description of the John matches with a Carnotaurus, a bigger theoropod than Tyrannosaurus that used to live in South America around 75 milions of years ago.The are where the animal was sight is completely savage. Only a few native remnants (around 100) still live there:


It was amazing hard to find, but i got some quotes of the journal in a Brazilian website:


" I heard a cry of alarm with a native shouting ' Stoa , the Stoa ! " I had no idea what was happening, but the cries have spread to thousands . More than 50 armed natives then ran to a cave . Once there, they shouted to him joining them, i grabbed my rifle and ran together to them . Suddenly appeared this magnificent beast of the woods and attacked the group of about 15 Indians. Soon after , most of these beasts appeared , the Indians have done nothing but tried to flee with no hope. "

" The strategy of these animals was interesting . They leaped upon the natives in order to crush them. So they after thye took out the natives, theu came to us. We took our rifles and shoot them . But nothing happened , it was as if we fired stone steel . " His repitile nature prevented them from feeling pain " [ ... ] natives with poisoned arrows appeared and began firing several of them against animals . Even so , they seemed to feel no effect , only dizziness after hundreds of arrows , two of these animals began mumbling in pain for a few minutes until lie on the floor . The refugees Indians came out of their caves and began singing and feasting on the body of the beast . "


In fact, Amazonia is a state in Brazil with over 1.570.746 km² and a population of only 3,8 million people even today. By that time there was only 800.000 people living there (not including the natives) Here's a draw of the animal (link to the site, so artist can get views.)

Whomever i'm not sure why the bullets did not killing the dinossaur but arrows killed. Either the ammunition was really bad or the posion was really powerful. In fact the natives used posion from the colored frogs, a very venemous animal which posion can kill a human in less than 2 minutes. So this would explain that.

Stoa draw




posted on Nov, 2 2014 @ 02:06 PM
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This is a painting I did based on an allosaur skeleton at the local natural history museum.
After spending some time studying its anatomy, I suspect that it killed prey by using its head as an axe.
I imagine it would have grabbed its victim with its hind talons and struck in the spine or skull like a woodpecker from hell.



posted on Nov, 2 2014 @ 02:20 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23

Nice painting!

But after studying it's anatomy, you came to the conclusion it used it's head as an axe?

I'm pretty sure that's what Paleontologists came up with years ago - sorry!

As for the OP - it's not out of the realm of impossibility that some Therapods could have survived, but it is highly unlikely. When the Dinosaurs went extinct, every animal over 25Kg's in weight was wiped out - bird, mammal, dinosaur or reptile.

It is worth noting, however, that with the demise of the dinosaurs, their cousins, the birds filled the niche for large predatory animals for quite a while and grew to be quite large themselves, the so called "Terror Birds".

But I suppose it is possible that a smaller Therapod survived and evolved to be larger over the years... Interesting none the less.



posted on Nov, 2 2014 @ 02:23 PM
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originally posted by: stumason
a reply to: skunkape23

Nice painting!

But after studying it's anatomy, you came to the conclusion it used it's head as an axe?

I'm pretty sure that's what Paleontologists came up with years ago - sorry!


I did not know that. Maybe they were right.



posted on Nov, 2 2014 @ 02:37 PM
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originally posted by: skunkape23

This is a painting I did based on an allosaur skeleton at the local natural history museum.
After spending some time studying its anatomy, I suspect that it killed prey by using its head as an axe.
I imagine it would have grabbed its victim with its hind talons and struck in the spine or skull like a woodpecker from hell.
Wow I like the painting, nice use of colors. You have Talent.



posted on Nov, 2 2014 @ 05:11 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23

Nice painting, but entirely inaccurate to everything we've learned about dinosaurs (particularly theropods) over the last 30 years. For one thing, the upright stance is wrong, it's now generally accepted that theropods walked in a semi-horizontal fashion using their tails as a counterweight. And the arms are attached wrong, they should be lower and more centered to the chest.

Oh, and regarding the feeding behavior (mentioned elsewhere in the thread), you're on the right track, but a woodpecker isn't a good comparison. Woodpeckers kind of hit things directly with their faces, whereas an allosaur would swing its jaw open to an unnerving width and used its upper jaw like an axe. And being 30-40 feet long, it probably didn't need to do much hanging on.



posted on Nov, 2 2014 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: ShadeWolf

Not to mention that most Therapods (and dinosaurs for that matter) were probably heavily feathered too....



posted on Nov, 2 2014 @ 06:50 PM
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a reply to: stumason

Actually, I was gonna mention that, but I googled it and apparently there's some evidence that larger theropods of the Jurassic era didn't have feathers, at least as adults.



posted on Nov, 2 2014 @ 07:39 PM
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a reply to: ShadeWolf

There was some research done recently which showed the Therapods, over time, evolution favoured them being smaller and it's these ones, like Troodons and Velociraptors which were feathered. I'm inclined to agree though that the T-Rex and Allosaurs were probably not feathered all over, but I think the jury is still out on them in the Paleo world.



posted on Nov, 3 2014 @ 01:14 PM
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originally posted by: stumason
a reply to: ShadeWolf

There was some research done recently which showed the Therapods, over time, evolution favoured them being smaller and it's these ones, like Troodons and Velociraptors which were feathered. I'm inclined to agree though that the T-Rex and Allosaurs were probably not feathered all over, but I think the jury is still out on them in the Paleo world.


I think we can get examples of croocdiles and land reptiles. Altrough it would be strange for crocodiles to have feathers and very unlikely, i really doubt large theorpods would have feathers. Why they would have them anyway? Mating would make semse, but meh.



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