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Gravitational Space Station

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posted on Dec, 9 2004 @ 08:20 PM
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If some space station ever had a artifical gravity system, will it screw up the moons orbit?




posted on Dec, 9 2004 @ 09:54 PM
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Not if the artificial gravity is only centered on the space station.



posted on Dec, 9 2004 @ 09:55 PM
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But if it does blow away the moon it will destroy the earths environment and kill us all

[edit on 9-12-2004 by Croat56]



posted on Dec, 9 2004 @ 10:02 PM
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How exactly could it blow away the moon? Think of a bicycle wheel. If you where miniturized and put inside and I spun the wheel, you would be pushed to the edges do to centripetal force. That is exacly how the artificial gravity works on a space station. So how could a spinning wheel in space blow away the moon?



posted on Dec, 9 2004 @ 10:52 PM
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Yeah, I have the same question as Day Slurpee... The gravity created in the space station would only affect the space station, since it would be gravity through centripetal force and not through a point of gravitation (ie the Sun or Earth.)



posted on Dec, 9 2004 @ 10:58 PM
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The Gravity you would need to effect something as big as the moon would be huge the gravity of the earth has a nice hold on the Moon I would think you would need near that amount to effect the moon in any big way.

Most plans for artifical gravity systems for space stations just involve spinning the station to produce a fraction of earth gravity on just the station.

[edit on 9-12-2004 by ShadowXIX]



posted on Dec, 10 2004 @ 01:16 AM
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Originally posted by Day Slurpee
How exactly could it blow away the moon? Think of a bicycle wheel. If you where miniturized and put inside and I spun the wheel, you would be pushed to the edges do to centripetal force. That is exacly how the artificial gravity works on a space station. So how could a spinning wheel in space blow away the moon?


Im just saying to be careful cause u dont know about that anti gravity stuff. someon could turn it on and accidently blow away the moon



posted on Dec, 10 2004 @ 01:19 AM
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Anti-Gravity I thought we were talking about artifical gravity?

I dont think anyone has every invented a anti-gravity system so I dont think we have to worry about that any time soon.



posted on Dec, 10 2004 @ 01:35 AM
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"I'm just saying to be careful cause u dont know about that anti gravity stuff. someon could turn it on and accidently blow away the moon"

Thanks, Croat56, I needed that. I agree, our history is littered with missteps that have caused great destruction i.e., the Philadelphia Project (Project Invisibility), etc. But the force needed to distrupt the moon's orbit with any gravitational device, is way beyond our capability.

[edit on 10-12-2004 by Mephorium]



posted on Dec, 10 2004 @ 08:45 PM
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Yup - gravity requires mass and we couldn't loft enough up there to cause any real harm. "Artificial" gravity is centripetal motion with resultant centrifugal force - no gravity created by that.

Anti-gravity - humm maybe, but it would have to be a whopper of a machine and there is no definitive proof we even have it yet.

Now, titor's singularity in a box in a corvette - who knows..??



posted on Dec, 10 2004 @ 09:10 PM
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Reminds me of the opening scenes in the video game HALO. A massive spinning ring creating gravity.




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