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Over 214,000 Doctors To Withdraw From Obamacare

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posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 03:15 AM
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originally posted by: tavi45
for the public good. It's not like anyone else does.

And what pay cut did you offer to take to give people medical care?




posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 03:18 AM
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Oh I see,thanks for making it clearer.Well I'm happy for you that you've benefited from the ACA,medical expenses+procedures can be prohibitively expensive,as I've experienced myself.If your cover has'nt changed,and your overall premium was lowered,you have indeed gotten a better deal.I see many folks seem to be worse off though,from the posts I read here.

here.a reply to: Phage



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 03:22 AM
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originally posted by: hounddoghowlie
a reply to: xuenchen

i'm figuring a year to three maybe four tops before obumacare is is repealed, depending on all the legal wrangling they they like to play.

it's doomed. to many people fussing over it.


It will be modified but never repealed. It would be political suicide for a President from any party to sign a bill repealing the AFA at this point. We know they wont do it as their next election is more important than the good of the Nation.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 03:24 AM
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a reply to: Raxoxane
The medical marketplace was subjected to a major rattling. It's all very new and the dust has not yet settled.

But I think there was much misunderstanding about what the ACA was going to try to accomplish. Some thought it would be something like socialized medicine. Some thought that it meant that everyone would automatically have medical insurance. I think idea behind it is good and necessary but such a major change in a way of doing things is bound to have unforeseen consequences.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 03:24 AM
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originally posted by: Raxoxane
Oh I see,thanks for making it clearer.Well I'm happy for you that you've benefited from the ACA,medical expenses+procedures can be prohibitively expensive,as I've experienced myself.If your cover has'nt changed,and your overall premium was lowered,you have indeed gotten a better deal.I see many folks seem to be worse off though,from the posts I read here.

here.a reply to: Phage


Nationwide about 18% are better off, 36% are worse off.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 03:25 AM
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originally posted by: Xeven

originally posted by: hounddoghowlie
a reply to: xuenchen

i'm figuring a year to three maybe four tops before obumacare is is repealed, depending on all the legal wrangling they they like to play.

it's doomed. to many people fussing over it.


It will be modified but never repealed. It would be political suicide for a President from any party to sign a bill repealing the AFA at this point. We know they wont do it as their next election is more important than the good of the Nation.

I work in healthcare. It will never be repealed. It's basically impossible at this point.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 03:28 AM
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Please forgive me for not being an expert on the subject matter but.....

I would be interested to know:

How have the share prices of these health insurance companies changed?
In their annual accounts have they posted higher than normal profits?
Have dividend payments to shareholders increased?

I think the answers to questions along these lines will ultimately reflect the true nature of these premium increases. If anyone has any figures or research pertaining to these answers I (and I believe others) will be grateful.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 03:28 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

So 46% have seen no effect.

"Better" and "worse" by what standard? Do those numbers represent those who already had medical insurance? How do those who could not get medical insurance prior to the ACA fit in to those numbers?


The nation's uninsured rate among working-age adults fell from 20 percent to 15 percent, or by an estimated 9.5 million people, as the central coverage provisions of the Affordable Care Act went into effect in 2014.

www.commonwealthfund.org...
edit on 10/30/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 03:56 AM
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where would these 200 thousand or so doctors go? over here in the UK we're short of doctors but the pay and the general lousy weather (aka its rains a lot) wont be much to attract many over the pond who are used to the american lifestyle plus they'd still have to pass a UK test to be allowed to practice over here

The american system seems totally out of joint with the needs of the people, we pay national insurance as part of our wages and thats the cornerstone of the NHS now its a good chunk of change but since pretty much everyone pops in that change its a fair amount of money, oh yes theres problems with the system but if the politicians didn't keep changing the goal posts every few years i'm sure things would be much better, but from diagnosis to start of surgical breast cancer removal for my mum it took 2 months and it was only that long as she wanted a week away before with family



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 04:08 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: OccamsRazor04

So 46% have seen no effect.

"Better" and "worse" by what standard? Do those numbers represent those who already had medical insurance? How do those who could not get medical insurance prior to the ACA fit in to those numbers?


The nation's uninsured rate among working-age adults fell from 20 percent to 15 percent, or by an estimated 9.5 million people, as the central coverage provisions of the Affordable Care Act went into effect in 2014.

www.commonwealthfund.org...

It was a CNN poll. They were asked (I think) if the ACA helped or hurt them and their families. 18% said the ACA helped them, 36% said it hurt them. The interesting part was that even though very few people said they were helped, the majority believed MOST people were helped. So almost all people tended to be hurt or stayed about the same, but thought the majority of other people were helped.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 04:19 AM
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a reply to: tavi45

I am not poor, but have held off getting a surgery even WITH good insurance because of the extremely high deductibles that I just can't pay right now. So it ain't just poor people now a days who don't get health care. Many people who have health insurance don't use it because of those high deductibles.
edit on 30-10-2014 by transola because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 04:22 AM
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Though not quite on 'health' insurance policies we have a sort of 'insurance scam' going on in the UK at the moment. All small companies are being forced to buy retirement pension insurance for their employers along with large companies. I have a good friend who has just lost his job because the owner of the small firm he works / worked for cannot / will NOT pay out for pensions for his staff...........too expensive and too complicated for a small firm to deal with.

Let's face it.........insurance is being FORCED onto people at exhorbitant rates.

it is really money for nothing in the long run.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 04:28 AM
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I just got my new star spangly looking VA health card in the mail last week.

Did I mention that being a vet in the VA means I don't have to get insurance.




Anyway I hope it all works out at some point. The ACA I mean. I will be rooting for ya.


BTW I like my VA here.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 04:31 AM
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In the last 12 months I have had awake brain surgery, 6 months chemo therapy, rushed to hospital after a stroke, 4 months stay in a private hospital for daily rehabilitation as an inpatient, upon leaving I have been receiving weekly physio therapy and occupational therapy for 6 weeks as an out patient. More blood tests and urine tests than I care to remember. I dread to think how much this would have cost in America. I'm surprised the NHS hasn't bumped me off as a cost saving measure. I don't even pay for prescription meds
edit on 30-10-2014 by woodwardjnr because: (no reason given)

edit on 30-10-2014 by woodwardjnr because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 04:53 AM
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a reply to: woodwardjnr

I am in the same boat as you. Had 4xMRI's (the last one was a full-body scan), 4x CT'scans, ultrasounds, EMG's and EEG's taken, been taken to hospital by ambulance, one was even an air ambulance, after seizures, saw numerous specialists, genetic tests, etc. And it is still not the end of the road. Since January I've been unable to work due to my condition, due to my condition, and it all costed me around US$200. I guess if I was in the USA, I would have had to stay under a bridge by now, heck, most propabøy I wouldn't have been able to pay for a single test. Heck, I am glad I dont live in the USA.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 04:55 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: Raxoxane
The medical marketplace was subjected to a major rattling. It's all very new and the dust has not yet settled.

But I think there was much misunderstanding about what the ACA was going to try to accomplish. Some thought it would be something like socialized medicine. Some thought that it meant that everyone would automatically have medical insurance. I think idea behind it is good and necessary but such a major change in a way of doing things is bound to have unforeseen consequences.


Yes Phage, one of the biggest misunderstandings is it was supposed to be an AFFORDABLE care act. Obama had a minimum amount of enrollees that were needed to make it work and apparently reached their goal. However the premiums are such that they are unaffordable for too many people, including those with pre-existing conditions. So it now becomes a vicious circle. Limited amount of new enrollees because they can't afford it, rising premiums and deductibles for the currently enrolled.

What's been created is a huge mess all because of an ACA that was supposedly needed to add birth control, pre-existing conditions and children up to age 26.....if that were only the case bills could have been passed to take care of these issues. Instead a 1000+ pages of a health care bill which has little to do with health care and a whole lot to do with tax increases and penalties.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 05:03 AM
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a reply to: Hellhound604

I think if we were in the US we might be dead. I feel kind of guilty the amount I've had from the NHS pot. I'm not quite sure how I ended up in a private hospital for the last 4 months. Apparently it would have cost over 800 pounds a day. It was nice though. Great staff and really well looked after. Food was a bit crap but shouldn't complain😉.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 05:34 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04

Lol. Pay cut? I've never had a job with benefits and have lived under the poverty line for years.

I'm currently tutoring for several families privately at rates that are less than half what I could charge because I genuinely want to help these kids and never really caught that greed disease that's been going around. I actually had 1 client, 1 former coworker and my own mother tell me I should charge more just this month.

I use no social services whatsoever, unlike my hard-line Republican friend (he hates welfare and "socialism") who was on unemployment for 2 years until a family friend gave him a job.

I pretty much never go to the doctor or dentist and when I do I pay out of pocket because I lack insurance. Actually that's not true anymore. I have it now thanks to ACA but it's a waste since I probably won't use it for another decade or two since I'm quite healthy. This is much like my car insurance since I've never been in an accident.

So in other words I pay far more into the system then I'll ever get in return.. It's very weird since most people think the poor exist only as a drain on the system. So far I haven't drained the system at all and have contributed more money to it then I could ever hope to have in my bank account at any time in my life.

On top of that my constant spending and inability to save (known as living paycheck to paycheck) makes me a lynchpin to driving the economy. I'm literally the ideal of the consumer slave.

Thanks a lot for taking the time to attack me with a one liner though. You definitely contributed
. I'm no saint. I've met hundreds of people in my life who do more for others than I do. I'm definitely closer to the end of the spectrum of contributing than the end of parasitically abusing though. I don't dodge taxes, abuse social services, hoard money etc etc.

Either way my whole point was that nothing will ever get fixed so long as we worship money over human beings. Greed and selfishness are American virtues these days. America started by revering hard work and independence but these ideals have been perverted into greed and selfishness respectively.

So doctors leaving after ACA is to be expected. When costs of living rise it affects everyone except the top tier. For most doctors it's probably purely economic. You can be sure the 1% won't be affected at all.

The middle class takes another hit, just like they've been doing for decades now. The lower class gets a miniscule and mostly token bit of help. Instead of the middle class blaming the 1% they turn on the poor for being so god damn selfish to want a taste of what every American should be getting regardless.

Blame the poor, praise and worship the rich. It's worked so far right? Just remember never to blame the fascist overlords. They love you and care about you. Oh and don't forget to blame the current scapegoat in chief. Just never ever ever blame the ones actively oppressing you while they enjoy the high life. Remember if you work hard enough you could be one of them. You could also win the lottery too. Probably better off just buying the lotto ticket. Better odds.


PS : I'm talking about American culture in general. I'm aware tons of Americans are hardworking compassionate individuals but even so many of them have been corrupted by the worship of money. I see it even in my own family, who are the ideal of middle class America. As an example my incredibly hardworking, honest aunt is at risk of going homeless thanks to her drug addict (pills not meth, he's a high class piece of trash addict) husband walking out on her after eating up their resources for well over a decade. None of her siblings, including her best friend, my mother, offered any help besides emotional comfort. Thankfully she already put her three children through college by working 2 jobs.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 05:35 AM
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originally posted by: hounddoghowlie
a reply to: xuenchen

i'm figuring a year to three maybe four tops before obumacare is is repealed, depending on all the legal wrangling they they like to play.

it's doomed. to many people fussing over it.



Round one under "HillaryCare" was unconstitutional.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 05:38 AM
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originally posted by: tavi45
a reply to: OccamsRazor04

Lol. Pay cut? I've never had a job with benefits and have lived under the poverty line for years.


So you are unwilling to take a pay cut, but want others to do so in order to pay your way? Sounds about right.



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