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Racism or profiling

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posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:12 PM
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So we have all seen the rash of stories lately of police arresting or abusing black males. a lot of people will want to jump to the conclusion that it is just mass racism from the police. If we look at the you tube story of the man in Indiana, and others like it. And I hope I don't get in trouble with other black ATS members for saying this. But what if it is not racism and just profiling work done by the police? If you have a good chunk of a demographic in an area that is constantly getting arrested for whatever negative activity why not profile. I mean we profile who terrorist are. I mean when I think of a terrorist I don't think of some Japanese person. But when you think of your on the street drug dealer you don't think of a 21 year old white girl rocking ambercrombie right.

so why is it wrong for police to target people who are leading in these statistic's if they fit the demographic for committing these types of crimes.

I am not saying that the police are always right or justified in there actions. I am asking the question wanting to know the answer is it racism or profiling? Because we forget sometimes that's part of the job as the police is to profile right.

And I guess I should also mention in a lot of these cases we have had the story of the black male not responding to the officer when they have been asked to do something.




posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:16 PM
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I would say that if you profile the wrong groups, it's racism as far as the PC police are concerned, and they will always point to the exception to prove their point because there are always plenty of exceptions.

I'm not going to completely defend the cops. They're getting too militarized for my taste, but we have a society that is fundamentally breaking down at all levels, and they are charged with trying to keep some kind of order in it. Their job is getting harder, top to bottom. I think it's only going to get worse for them, frankly, until people realize that we are the problem and start fixing ourselves.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: American-philosopher


So we have all seen the rash of stories lately of police arresting or abusing black males.


Profiling would result in the police stopping and maybe questioning the person.

Racism would result in arrest for no reason, or otherwise abusing the person.

Unfortunately, there has been so much of the latter, that young black men are scared to death of the police and so ANY encounter is likely to end badly.

You don't beat someone silly or shoot them in the back while you're "profiling".
edit on 10/29/2014 by Benevolent Heretic because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:19 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

oh I completely agree that the police are to militarized but there's a reason why that's happening but thats a whole other deal



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:21 PM
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We have seen these stories so much lately because the media is promoting it.

Every day there is black on white crime - where is the media then?

Every day there is a black cop that shoots white people - where is the media then?

Where are the bleeding hearts then?

No, this is a one sided argument.

When it's white on black crime, or assault, everyone loses their flipping minds. When it's the inverse, everyone is ok with it.

This is nothing new.

Wake up people. Realize the media is manipulating your emotions, and controlling you.

The more angry you are, the more hurt you are, the more emotion you fume on - the less you think on your own.

Think for yourself.

edit on 29-10-2014 by MentorsRiddle because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:25 PM
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Every single day white police officers In the U.S. drive past, walk past, roll past, bicycle past hundreds maybe thousands of black people and don't arrest them, detain them, abuse them, question them, etc.

Ask yourself how is that possible?



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:25 PM
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And I guess I should also mention in a lot of these cases we have had the story of the black male not responding to the officer when they have been asked to do something.


This is the one fact people always want to ignore.

And 98% of these cases, the person not responding is brandishing a deadly weapon.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:26 PM
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a reply to: MentorsRiddle

I don't know where you live but in my state last time I checked we have over balanced ratio of black males incarcerated. is that media manipulation.

So I am not going to let you off the hook that easily.

so one more time is it profiling or racism in your opinion??



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:29 PM
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And anyone who has taken the time to read this. I recommend watching the john oliver on prison's. very funny and insightful



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:38 PM
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originally posted by: American-philosopher
a reply to: MentorsRiddle

I don't know where you live but in my state last time I checked we have over balanced ratio of black males incarcerated. is that media manipulation.

So I am not going to let you off the hook that easily.

so one more time is it profiling or racism in your opinion??



You cannot herd me into a direction of your choice. Either choice I pick is a negative choice, and doesn't accurately reflect the reality of a situation.

I can ask you, "What color is a tree - True or False?"

You cannot really answer true or false, because that's not really a valid answer to the question.

The reason so many black males are incarcerated has a very simple answer - which I'm sure you already know.

Poverty and existing around poverty breeds hate, and anger. Hate and anger breeds aggression and crime. Aggression and crime gives you incarceration.

If you look at a demographic of race to income, blacks are among the lowest. This lack of income means less education, and a cycle that constantly repeats. Family life breaks down, and civility follows next.

This is a very obvious problem, which has been going on for sometime now.

But instead of pointing the finger at racism, or profiling - perhaps we should point the finger where it really belongs - at those who enable this type of behavior.

Our system is designed to keep the blacks and minorities dependent on a system that rewards bad behavior.

But it's not just blacks, and minorities - even poverty stricken white people have fallen victim to this system; there are just less whites who have fallen victim to it.

These are all very simple concepts, and facts that have been presented time and time again. But people choose to believe what they want.

It isn't black people's fault. It's the system's fault for holding them back. And while the media, who are just really puppets of the system, point people at one another, the system is free to continue it's abuse.

This is a simple magic trick. Hold one hand up and wave it, and while everyone is looking at that hand, the other hand is performing the sneaky maneuver while everyone is distracted.

In this case, the idea of racism and profiling is the waving hand, while the system that keeps people dependent is being the sneaky hand - performing its clandestine machinations.


edit on 29-10-2014 by MentorsRiddle because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:44 PM
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It's not the systems fault for holding black people back it's their peers and leaders. The smart poor can get a free ride anywhere they choose. Just the facts




posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:47 PM
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originally posted by: mikell
It's not the systems fault for holding black people back it's their peers and leaders. The smart poor can get a free ride anywhere they choose. Just the facts



You're right - but those leaders are part of that system. They are lackeys of the system. As long as they promote that system, and focus people on race, then the system rewards them.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:58 PM
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originally posted by: MentorsRiddle

originally posted by: American-philosopher
a reply to: MentorsRiddle

I don't know where you live but in my state last time I checked we have over balanced ratio of black males incarcerated. is that media manipulation.

So I am not going to let you off the hook that easily.

so one more time is it profiling or racism in your opinion??



You cannot herd me into a direction of your choice. Either choice I pick is a negative choice, and doesn't accurately reflect the reality of a situation.

I can ask you, "What color is a tree - True or False?"

You cannot really answer true or false, because that's not really a valid answer to the question.

The reason so many black males are incarcerated has a very simple answer - which I'm sure you already know.

Poverty and existing around poverty breeds hate, and anger. Hate and anger breeds aggression and crime. Aggression and crime gives you incarceration.

If you look at a demographic of race to income, blacks are among the lowest. This lack of income means less education, and a cycle that constantly repeats. Family life breaks down, and civility follows next.

This is a very obvious problem, which has been going on for sometime now.

But instead of pointing the finger at racism, or profiling - perhaps we should point the finger where it really belongs - at those who enable this type of behavior.

Our system is designed to keep the blacks and minorities dependent on a system that rewards bad behavior.

But it's not just blacks, and minorities - even poverty stricken white people have fallen victim to this system; there are just less whites who have fallen victim to it.

These are all very simple concepts, and facts that have been presented time and time again. But people choose to believe what they want.

It isn't black people's fault. It's the system's fault for holding them back. And while the media, who are just really puppets of the system, point people at one another, the system is free to continue it's abuse.

This is a simple magic trick. Hold one hand up and wave it, and while everyone is looking at that hand, the other hand is performing the sneaky maneuver while everyone is distracted.

In this case, the idea of racism and profiling is the waving hand, while the system that keeps people dependent is being the sneaky hand - performing its clandestine machinations.



they should probably have moved into better neighborhoods in the early days or gotten better education, thats how you came to be right? Your parents instilled this greatness into you, you grew up in a good neighborhood where you could do as you pleased and your possibilities where endless, your parents had the same possibilities. I wonder what happened to the race of people that didn't have those possibilities, I wonder what the children of oppressed people stuck in oppressed neighborhoods limited to what is in them and educated by people who barely got an education themselves? What kind of children would people who werent allowed to walk into a store, learn a good education, fear the master race, etc have?



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 03:04 PM
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originally posted by: American-philosopher
a reply to: MentorsRiddle

I don't know where you live but in my state last time I checked we have over balanced ratio of black males incarcerated. is that media manipulation.

So I am not going to let you off the hook that easily.

so one more time is it profiling or racism in your opinion??



It could also be culture.

Black males are much more likely to grow up in homes without fathers to teach them how young men should behave. They are much more likely to grow up in homes where their only role models are unwed teenage mothers which means very young, poor, often very poorly educated women. They wind up turning to gangs of other young males like themselves to find that male influence in their lives, and when you have young men who have no idea how they should comport themselves in polite society attempting to raise each other, you have problems.

Then, you have the larger society that excuses it as "black culture" instead of calling it what it is - broken.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 03:06 PM
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a reply to: chishuppu

I don't know, but I taught in school with a lot of "those people" and they were all races.

Also I live in a middle class neighborhood of all races.

It's not a race issue; it's a culture issue.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 03:07 PM
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they should probably have moved into better neighborhoods in the early days or gotten better education, thats how you came to be right? Your parents instilled this greatness into you, you grew up in a good neighborhood where you could do as you pleased and your possibilities where endless, your parents had the same possibilities. I wonder what happened to the race of people that didn't have those possibilities, I wonder what the children of oppressed people stuck in oppressed neighborhoods limited to what is in them and educated by people who barely got an education themselves? What kind of children would people who werent allowed to walk into a store, learn a good education, fear the master race, etc have?


Hey pal - don't judge me.

You have absolutely no idea what kind of life I've had. You have no idea how many friend's I've lost, or family member's I've seen fall off the deep end.

What I am is a person who pays attention to the world around him.

What I am is a person who sees cycles, and patterns.

What I am is a person who understands that continuing down the same road for year after year, expecting to end up on a different road, is insanity.

If you take the time to read what I have written, which obviously you haven't made it to the end, you will realize that I am not blaming blacks, whites, browns, yellows, etc.

I am blaming a system that keeps them in bondage to it.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 03:07 PM
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Anyone who happens to question those in positions of authority, well, we can expect them to be picked up, arrested, trial without a jury and the key thrown away. Just remember, if I happen to be sharing a cell with you--I get the top bunk.
edit on 29-10-2014 by IshKaBibbleBaby because: spelling



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 03:11 PM
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You know what – I’ll go ahead and answer your questions.

My mother grew up in an abusive family, and my dad grew up in one where his mother tried to kill him often. ( and by kill, I mean literally kill him.... with a knife.)

I grew up in a poor family, living in a bad part of town, while my father worked nights in a pretzel shop – and my mom worked at a hospital as a transcriptionist.

My dad realized that this lifestyle wouldn’t last and joined the military – and retired from it.

We went from dirt poor, to just middle class.

I am now middleclass, and live in a small neighborhood of other middleclass families.

So – I haven’t been given a golden spoon to eat from, or a free ride where my options were unlimited.

My family dragged themselves up from the crap, and into a life that is more stable. So I have somewhat of a healthy perspective on what it takes to make something of yourself, and not rely on a system that wants you to stay down.

edit on 29-10-2014 by MentorsRiddle because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 04:04 PM
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a reply to: MentorsRiddle

Agreed.

My father left me when I was 2. He decided that he would rather smoke pot and play music than be a dad.

Half of my childhood was spent living in an 18 foot tow behind trailer. My mom who had me at 18 was and still is a waitress. She never completed college.

As a child I spent many days home by myself and a lot of nights sitting in a booth at a local bar called Walley's Pad while my mother worked.

We were poor.

However what we lacked financially she made up with love. She raised me to treat people with respect and stand up for those that had no voice. She showed me the importance of earning an education and instilled in me a strong work ethic.

Because of her I at 30 years of age now own a home, two cars, have health insurance, a retirement plan, and a college education.

So needless to say it is very difficult for me to hear people make excuses. I understand that the economy is not what it used to be. That being said this is America and there are still opportunities available. The problem is there is no sense of sacrifice or hard work with a lot of society. There is an etitlement mentality in this country and it stinks!
edit on 29-10-2014 by TorqueyThePig because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 04:13 PM
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However what we lacked financially she made up with love. She raised me to treat people with respect and stand up for those that had no voice. She showed me the importance of earning an education and instilled in me a strong work ethic.


This is one of the most wonderfully beautiful statements I have read here.

It sounds like your mom was a woman that any child would be lucky to have.



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