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La Raza Promotes Washington Post Guide On Where People Can Vote Without An ID

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posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 06:07 PM
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a reply to: sheepslayer247

Like I have said, I think the voting is rigged anyway. I have no faith in the political system as there is too much corruption.
I just don't like when there is dishonesty, no matter who is being dishonest.




posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 06:09 PM
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a reply to: Kali74

They were coming in at the same time as me and were in front of me in line. And yes, I did demand their ID be checked because when the lady asked him for his name and address he handed her a piece of paper without saying a word. He also bolted without voting when I called the police because the station workers didn't give a crap.

And there is a video is in this thread of illegal immigrants voting and being confronted. Myself and someone else linked it and I also posted a link to a news article about them voting in Maryland.

They vote because they think if democrats control government they'll be granted amnesty.

To deny this happens is ignorant.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 07:34 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
a reply to: Gryphon66

Read the wording of the law, I posted it earlier. It says "May require", leaving it ambiguous at best.


Are you referring to your link at registertovote.org?

That's not California law; what are you quoting your "may require" from?

Here's the California Elections Code.

Here's the Voter Identification Requirements from the California Secretary of State's office (website).

From that document:



Proof of Identity Required
Proof of identity may be provided prior to an election or at the polling place on Election
Day. The following provide examples of when the proof of identity requirement has
been satisfied:
♦ The applicant provided satisfactory proof of identity with the voter
registration application or otherwise provided satisfactory proof of identity
prior to voting in a Federal election (Title 2, California Code of
Regulations, Section 20108.38(a)(i)); or
♦ The applicant’s California driver’s license or state identification number, or
the last four digits of the applicant’s social security number, was verified
with Calvalidator or the California Department of Motor Vehicles (Title 2,
California Code of Regulations, Section 20108.38(a)(ii); or
♦ The applicant provided satisfactory proof of identity at the polling place
when he or she went to vote; or
♦ The applicant provided satisfactory proof of identity with his or her
absentee ballot.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 07:43 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko

They vote because they think if democrats control government they'll be granted amnesty.

To deny this happens is ignorant.


I was willing to give you the benefit of the doubt until these little gems.

This belies your claim to non-partisan beliefs. You have provided no evidence to back up this claim (because none exists).

And not for nothing, can't help but notice that you're pretty militant regarding "brown people" ... did you check to see if the "white people" who were voting had names sounded acceptable to you as well?

Some illegals vote. Some who are certifiably mentally ill vote. Some felons vote. All are equally illegal.

You know what else is illegal? Suppressing votes. When I hear the folks who are obsessed with setting up special ID requirements show as much concern about American citizens NOT being able to vote, I'll give the whole thing a bit more credence.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 07:59 PM
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a reply to: Gryphon66




So, just to be clear, because we have no evidence that something exists, we should therefore believe that it does exist?



I guess it's sort of like that Georgia case where the New Georgia Project gal said they need to catch the voter suppression before it happens.





posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 08:15 PM
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Just had this come across my FB feed

N.C. Sen. Kay Hagan Campaign Workers Caught on Video Telling Illegal Aliens to VOTE



From the article:



“If they are illegal aliens, how on Earth did they register to vote?” The answer was one of the most nefarious laws signed by President Bill Clinton during his two years with a Democrat majority in the Congress: the Motor Voter Law of 1993. This law allowed people to register to vote at the same time they got their drives licenses, so long as they ATTEST that they are citizens. No proof of citizenship is required, insanely.


A photo voter ID, obtained only with proof of US citizenship, should be required to vote. For those arguing that voter fraud doesn't exist, why do you feel that non-citizens should be allowed to vote for our representatives?

ETA:
Massive Non-Citizen Voting Uncovered in Maryland


An election integrity watchdog group is suing the state of Maryland, alleging that it has discovered massive and ongoing fraudulent voting by non-U.S. citizens in one county.



edit on 10/30/2014 by halfpint0701 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 08:15 PM
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a reply to: ThirdEyeofHorus

No, actually, it's nothing like that.

The Georgia Secretary of State is on record as responding that there's no law that says his office has to process voter registrations.

Odd thing to claim if you're already processed them all, isn't it?

The New Georgia Project helped register thousands of new voters. As with any such efforts, some of the registrations were flawed. It is the job of the county election boards, as well as the SOS, to verify registrations. Kemp has done everything he can to avoid cooperating with these citizens who are working to help other citizens register to vote.

I know that the Republicans pretty much suck at voter registration (Kemp admitted this back in July, as noted).

That is no excuse to actively work to disenfranchise American voters.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 08:21 PM
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originally posted by: halfpint0701 For those arguing that voter fraud doesn't exist, why do you feel that non-citizens should be allowed to vote for our representatives?


No one is arguing that voter fraud doesn't exist.

Evidence gathered by such entities as the Bush Department of Justice (in a five year investigation), numerous Republican Secretaries of State, have shown, repeatedly and consistently, that the incidence of voter fraud is miniscule when compared with the overall number of votes cast, i.e. usually on the scale of 1 to 1,000,000.

Stating that voter fraud is virtually non-existent does not mean that anyone feels that non-citizens should be allowed to vote for anyone. That's just fallacious logic.

So, to answer your loaded question, "we don't."



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 08:33 PM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

I'm referring to her statement of the need to CATCH it BEFORE it happens. Maybe she really meant prevent it from happening.

Here's a news story on video about Rep Stacey Abrams, who's project is the New Georgia Project

www.11alive.com...

And 1 in 1,000,000 cases? You must be doing that new Common Core math again... even the ThinkProgress article posted on the other thread cites more than that


A subsequent investigation found just 25 confirmed forgeries out of more than 85,000 forms

thinkprogress.org...
edit on 30-10-2014 by ThirdEyeofHorus because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 08:43 PM
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a reply to: ThirdEyeofHorus

Did you try to track their side of the argument ThirdEyeofHorus?

Here's the deal. They've worked hard to register voters and they've registered a lot of them. They've submitted those registrations to the County election boards as appropriate. They've tried to work with these County governments to make sure that the registrations are as valid as possible.

The Office of the SOS compiles information on all registered voters, and after comparing the lists of registered voters with their own lists of the voters they helped register, they found large discrepancies (that's where the 40-50K numbers come from). They tried to work with the SOS to resolve the matter, and he ignored them. So, they took him to court, and the Republican-appointed judge responded with the "well, voters haven't been denied the right to vote until they've been denied the right to vote."

Georgia is a Republican-machine state as surely as Chicago can be a Democratic-machine city. I live here, and I'm offering first hand knowledge of how things go.

I promise you that racism is alive and well in the Peach State, card played or not.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 08:54 PM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

So democrats aren't pushing for amnesty? They haven't submitted several amnesty bills? That's not an incentive for someone who would benefit from it to vote?

For the record I'm all for amnesty, but only if they fix it this time. Reagen promised he'd fix it when he granted amnesty last time and nobody fixed it. Until that happens though I want people to vote LEGALLY.

I also think it's ridiculous felons can't vote. Once they serve their time they should be granted full rights.
edit on 30-10-2014 by raymundoko because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 09:02 PM
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a reply to: Gryphon66





Here's the deal. They've worked hard to register voters and they've registered a lot of them.


Oh sure I get that. All kinds of criminals work hard at scamming folks. Just because they have worked hard doesn't mean they are innocent. The New Georgia Project people say that they are not responsible for fraudulent registrations they turn in, and specifically even if it's Mickey Mouse. Yes she said it!


Abrams is quick to point out, however, that her group is required by law to turn in every application they collect, even if it contains errors. “If the form says Mickey Mouse registered in Anaheim, California, we have to turn that form in,” Abrams said in an interview with Newsweek last week.


www.newsweek.com...
edit on 30-10-2014 by ThirdEyeofHorus because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 09:09 PM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

I'm from GA and I live in ATL part time. I agree racism exists there, but I also lived in green bay Wisconsin and those are the most racist people I've ever had the privilege of being around.

The least racist place I've lived is my other residence in So-Cal and maybe Manhattan.
edit on 30-10-2014 by raymundoko because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: raymundoko

Are you familiar with the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986?

This was a bi-partisan effort signed into law by President Reagan, that attempted to rationally deal with the number of illegal immigrants that were currently in the US at that time. The legislation legalized illegal immigrants who entered the United States before January 1, 1982 and had resided there continuously with the penalty of a fine, back taxes due, and admission of guilt; candidates were required to prove that they were not guilty of crimes, that they were in the country before January 1, 1982, and that they possessed minimal knowledge about U.S. history, government, and the English language. (Wiki)

Or, perhaps with the ‘‘Border Security, Economic Opportunity, and Immigration Modernization Act’’ Link

Pro-comprehensive immigration reform Senate Republicans teamed up with every Democrat to support this bill, which became known as the “Gang of Eight bill.” It increased legal immigration limits threefold, created a guest-worker program and granted amnesty to some 11 million illegal immigrants. The measure passed the Senate with sixty-eight votes. (Including Republican votes.)

Or, maybe with the "Growth and Opportunity Project" sponsored by the Republican National Committee?



As stated above, we are not a policy committee, but among the steps Republicans take in the Hispanic community and beyond we must embrace and champion comprehensive immigration reform. If we do not, our Party’s appeal will continue to shrink to its core constituencies only. We also believe that comprehensive immigration reform is consistent with Republican economic policies that promote job growth and opportunity for all. (p. 8)


So, no, I don't that it's a fair statement that Hispanics, illegal or not, would believe that Democrats are their only option for amnesty.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 09:23 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
a reply to: Gryphon66

I'm from GA and I live in ATL part time. I agree racism exists there, but I also lived in green bay Wisconsin and those are the most racist people I've ever had the privilege of being around.

The least racist place I've lived is my other residence in So-Cal and maybe Manhattan.


Being around racists is a "privilege"?

I hope that's a figure of speech.


Yeah, I've lived in Georgia all my life. I used to argue that we weren't completely the backwoods yokels most of the country make us out to be, but I've had to stop that in the last decade or so. I know that GA is not the only place where racism exists, but I would say that we have incorporated it into our governmental and economic systems more prevalently and overtly than most other states and cities I'm aware of.

My $0.02



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 09:57 PM
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A proposed law may put Illinois on that list too. (If not there already.)

illinoisreview.typepad.com...[/ur l]

Sounds good on the surface, but some would also argue that it could be pushed to the extent that no ID is required. In which case the system could be exploited with not much in the way of any other checks in place. It may make it easier to go district hopping and voting at other polling stations with multiple registered false names and such. (And as some would say, there are already a lot of "zombie" voters in Chicago as it is.)

Illinois also already has many voter protections already in place and [url=http://www.dmv.org/il-illinois/voter-registration.php]registration isn't hard, so what exactly is this extraneous loosely written law needed for?
edit on 30-10-2014 by pauljs75 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 10:45 PM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

Of course it was a figure of speech. GA is not as bad as you think once you get out of it. I felt that way until I left. Atlanta is a bastion of diversity, so is Savannah.

Macon and Albany...not so much.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 10:48 PM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

Did you even read my post? I mention Reagen...

Ever sense then Republicans have resisted amnesty in favor of other types of immigration reform. Democrats still push for a flat amnesty.

I feel like you're ignoring that angle intentionally.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 10:56 PM
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a reply to: raymundoko

Did you read mine?

The second two examples both include recent examples of Republicans supporting "immigration reform" and a good number in the Senate voting for amnesty.

It's just not an "open and shut" case of one or the other. I don't think Hispanics here legally or illegally fall for simplistic narratives.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 11:27 PM
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a reply to: Gryphon66

Just because Reagan did it doesn't make it a good idea to do it again, even for those of us who loved Reagan more than any other President we know.
It was a mistake then and it's even a bigger mistake if we do it again. But remember Bush Sr was his vp, and there was plenty of CFR around to make sure he did their dirty work. Reagan himself had a magnanimous heart and probably believed he was doing the right thing. But there's always more to this than just being nice people. Big government statists want tax dollars. They want voters.
There are plenty of Republicans around who think that if they mimic Democrats they will also get the Hispanic vote. McCain is a clear example of that. I think statistics show though that the Democrats benefit far more from the illegal vote than Republicans.
edit on 30-10-2014 by ThirdEyeofHorus because: (no reason given)




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