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The antimatter center of the universe and dark energy.

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posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:36 AM
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Two of the greatest mysteries of the universe are,

1) We don't know where the missing antimatter is.
2) We don't know what dark energy is.

I present to you an idea:

When inflation of the universe began, matter and antimatter were evenly distributed. But, antimatter has an anti-gravity force to regular matter. So, they did not annihilate each other. Instead, they repelled each other. One way or another, regular matter wound up getting on the outside of antimatter, antimatter condensed to the center of the universe and regular matter expanded away from the center. Like gravity, this was done at an accelerating rate.

You would think that, if this were true, eventually, regular matter would get so far away from antimatter that the force would not have an effect, and there would be no accelerating expansion. But, that line of thinking only applies to regular gravity. Where, as we get further from the Earth, the force of gravity becomes less. On the contrary, with anti-gravity, as we get further away from antimatter, the force actually becomes greater.

Antimatter is condensing on its own gravitational force (which is only anti-gravity relative to regular matter but regular gravity relative to itself). It is essentially becoming an anti-black hole where, to us, its event horizon is inverted, but to itself, its event horizon is just like a regular event horizon. This causes the expansion of regular space to accelerate forever.




posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:42 AM
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What about dark matter? what does that do for the universe? is it pushing? or pulling? does it absorb energy, does it bend light? is it a figment of someone's imagination? after all, untill some mathematition decided there was not enough 'stuff' in the universe, dark matter did not exist.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 02:46 AM
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originally posted by: pikestaff
What about dark matter? what does that do for the universe? is it pushing? or pulling? does it absorb energy, does it bend light? is it a figment of someone's imagination? after all, untill some mathematition decided there was not enough 'stuff' in the universe, dark matter did not exist.


I don't know. Of course, I don't know any of this. Its just an idea.
edit on 29-10-2014 by smithjustinb because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 05:03 AM
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No idea if what you said was scientifically correct but to me (Ill add here I know nothing about anything) it sounds like it works and makes sense.

To be fair me agreeing and understanding probably means your theory is garbage



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 06:06 AM
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originally posted by: smithjustinb
Two of the greatest mysteries of the universe are,

1) We don't know where the missing antimatter is.
2) We don't know what dark energy is.


Firstly there is no Centre of the universe. It is a comon misconception that the big bang was an explosion... but it wasn't an explosion within space, it was an explosion of space.

Space is expanding in all directions at once and so regardless of where you are within it, it will look as though all of space is expanding away from you. In other words it always looks like you are at the center of the universe from where ever you are.

Secondly, we have a pretty good idea where Dark Energy comes from, we believe that it is the result of particles and their anti-particle partners that pop into and out of existence from the fundamental levels of reality. These particles appear and annihilate each other in less than an instant and are called virtual particles. It is the energy that these virtual particles create when they are annihilating each other than appears to be causing the universe to speed up it's expansion. The net energy of this is what is called Dark Energy.

Hope this clears up a few things for you.

all the best,

Korg.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 05:49 PM
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originally posted by: IkNOwSTuff

To be fair me agreeing and understanding probably means your theory is garbage


lol.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 06:00 PM
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originally posted by: Korg Trinity

originally posted by: smithjustinb
Two of the greatest mysteries of the universe are,

1) We don't know where the missing antimatter is.
2) We don't know what dark energy is.


Firstly there is no Centre of the universe.


That is the conclusion based on the assumption that the universe is 14 billion years old. Just because we can only see 14 billion years back doesn't mean that that is the age.


Space is expanding in all directions at once and so regardless of where you are within it, it will look as though all of space is expanding away from you. In other words it always looks like you are at the center of the universe from where ever you are.


If you are on the outside of an expanding balloon, it will look like that as well. The further things are, the faster they seem to move away from you.


Secondly, we have a pretty good idea where Dark Energy comes from, we believe that it is the result of particles and their anti-particle partners that pop into and out of existence from the fundamental levels of reality. These particles appear and annihilate each other in less than an instant and are called virtual particles. It is the energy that these virtual particles create when they are annihilating each other than appears to be causing the universe to speed up it's expansion. The net energy of this is what is called Dark Energy.


I don't know much about virtual particles. I'll look into it some more.


Hope this clears up a few things for you.


It is one possible valid explanation, based on what we know so far, but it isn't necessarily the correct one.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 09:06 PM
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a reply to: smithjustinb

I was listening to the weather channel guy last night and he said that the solar system is heating up because of it passing through the center of the Milky Way. Something has to do to the blackhole and the rotation of the spiral arms of the system we are in. Thought it was pretty interesting



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 01:10 AM
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a reply to: guitarplayer

He was wrong. We are not passing through the center of the Milky Way.
He should stick to being a TV weather man and stay away from astronomy and astrophysics.
edit on 10/30/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 01:15 AM
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originally posted by: guitarplayer
a reply to: smithjustinb

I was listening to the weather channel guy last night and he said that the solar system is heating up because of it passing through the center of the Milky Way. Something has to do to the blackhole and the rotation of the spiral arms of the system we are in. Thought it was pretty interesting


We're actually way out on one arm. Nowhere near the center. If we were, the sky at night would be #ing awesome. It's crowded in there.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 01:16 AM
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a reply to: smithjustinb

i commend you for thinking outside the box only problem is Anti matter has the same gravity as regular matter. We can make it and we can test it which has been done . Anti matter is basically just positrons and we can actually produce mass quantities of the stuff with a laser.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 01:25 AM
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a reply to: smithjustinb
It is obvious to me that the "missing" antimatter is in the center of galaxies. It would explain where the supermassive black holes came from.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 01:26 AM
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originally posted by: dragonridr
a reply to: smithjustinb

i commend you for thinking outside the box only problem is Anti matter has the same gravity as regular matter. We can make it and we can test it which has been done . Anti matter is basically just positrons and we can actually produce mass quantities of the stuff with a laser.


We don't know what kind of gravity antimatter has. Antimatter has been created, but not under conditions that allowed us to observe its gravity. According to Wikipedia, they still haven't done that test.

en.wikipedia.org...


hus far, there are three hypotheses about how antimatter gravitationally interacts with normal matter:

Normal gravity: The standard assumption is that gravitational interactions of matter and antimatter are identical.

Antigravity: Some authors argue that antimatter repels matter with the same magnitude as matter attracts matter (see below). This should not be confused with the many other speculative phenomena that may also be called 'anti-gravity'.

Gravivector and graviscalar: Later difficulties in creating quantum gravity theories have led to the idea that antimatter may react with a slightly different magnitude

edit on 30-10-2014 by smithjustinb because: (no reason given)

edit on 30-10-2014 by smithjustinb because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 05:03 AM
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originally posted by: dragonridr
a reply to: smithjustinb

i commend you for thinking outside the box only problem is Anti matter has the same gravity as regular matter. We can make it and we can test it which has been done . Anti matter is basically just positrons and we can actually produce mass quantities of the stuff with a laser.


I too was confident that antimatter had been found to fall the same as normal matter - I remember reading some announcement somewhere and not being surprised. However, I can't find this information now, only descriptions of how ALPHA at CERN should be able to make the required measurements in the future. Very strange...



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 06:00 PM
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originally posted by: EasyPleaseMe

I too was confident that antimatter had been found to fall the same as normal matter - I remember reading some announcement somewhere and not being surprised. However, I can't find this information now, only descriptions of how ALPHA at CERN should be able to make the required measurements in the future. Very strange...


CERN's ALPHA experiment results are inconclusive so far:


The team has made a statistical study of which antihydrogen atoms went where - up or down - and they are able to put a first set of constraints on how the anti-atoms respond to gravity.

The best limits they can suggest is that they are less than 110 times more susceptible to gravity than normal atoms, and less than 65 times that strength, but in the opposite direction: antigravity. In short, the question remains unanswered - so far.



posted on Nov, 1 2014 @ 03:17 AM
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originally posted by: smithjustinb

originally posted by: EasyPleaseMe

I too was confident that antimatter had been found to fall the same as normal matter - I remember reading some announcement somewhere and not being surprised. However, I can't find this information now, only descriptions of how ALPHA at CERN should be able to make the required measurements in the future. Very strange...


CERN's ALPHA experiment results are inconclusive so far:


The team has made a statistical study of which antihydrogen atoms went where - up or down - and they are able to put a first set of constraints on how the anti-atoms respond to gravity.

The best limits they can suggest is that they are less than 110 times more susceptible to gravity than normal atoms, and less than 65 times that strength, but in the opposite direction: antigravity. In short, the question remains unanswered - so far.


No not really they already did the experiment setting the outer limits they would have noticed if it didnt go into freefall. So now anti matter is stuck by gravity too the only question is really is it the same or slightly different. Indications are they are the same but will see if it falls towards the center of the outer edge of the limits.

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov...



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