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Has America Nuked Syria?

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posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 02:39 PM
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originally posted by: Zcustosmorum

And as I've said before, the article asks the questions and it's well known that the U.S. primarily has used depleted uranium in past conflicts.



You do realize that the US is not the only country with DU ?

World depleted uranium inventory

Country

Organization

Estimated DU stocks
(tonnes)

Reported

United States DOE 480,000

Russia FAEA 460,000

France Areva NC 190,000

United Kingdom 30,000

United Kingdom
Germany
Netherlands URENCO 16,000

Japan JNFL 10,000

China CNNC 2,000

South Korea KAERI 200

South Africa NECSA 73

Singapore DSO National Laboratories 60

TOTAL 1,188,273

Depleted Uranium ---> Source


You know which country stopped talking about their supply? Russia, back in 1996, that was the last time they reported their inventory levels. Think they don't have and or are not ready to use DU in their inventory?


Nasty stuff, one of those things we wish we could uninvent.

edit on 30-10-2014 by SLAYER69 because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: SLAYER69

Good info. What in the name of heck are we using it for? To bomb some caves because penetrating? Yeah well why? I have no idea what they are hitting Syria with but this whole thing is ridiculous.

"I have no idea but..." Is my new catchphrase today. I think it's code for "I know perfectly well but let me humor people."
edit on 30-10-2014 by nukedog because: (no reason given)


But in this case I have no idea what we are bombing people with today.
edit on 30-10-2014 by nukedog because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 07:27 PM
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a reply to: Zcustosmorum




Have you forgotten what site you're on? Haha


I don't understand your point. I was under the impression that ATS was a forum where people (mostly) tried to work together and root out false information, learn new (accurate) information, and really see through the mess. In other words, isn't ATS meant to be a place where conspiracy theorists are more respectable, sensible, and objective? If not, then yes, you're right, I forgot where I am, and my previous comment is invalid. If I'm right, then what I said before still stands.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 08:06 PM
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originally posted by: JohnFisher
a reply to: Zcustosmorum




Have you forgotten what site you're on? Haha


I don't understand your point. I was under the impression that ATS was a forum where people (mostly) tried to work together and root out false information, learn new (accurate) information, and really see through the mess. In other words, isn't ATS meant to be a place where conspiracy theorists are more respectable, sensible, and objective? If not, then yes, you're right, I forgot where I am, and my previous comment is invalid. If I'm right, then what I said before still stands.


So do that then instead of rambling on about rooting out crap blah blah blah. I have repeatededly said the article raises good points and you shouldn't be so ignorant as to just dismiss it because the authors theories may seem far-fetched to you, other people have different ideas.

And don't call people conspiracy theorists, it immediately makes me suspicious of you and your motives.

a reply to: SLAYER69

I merely picked the U.S. because they've been the most active in global warfare for the past few decades, ANY country using it could be mentioned but the U.S. excels as of recent times.

Regardless of terminology, I classify depleted uranium as nuclear and extremely dangerous, may I remind of the point in the last paragraph of the article:



Thus we stand, a nation that has used nuclear weapons in wars of aggression, a nation that turns quickly to such weapons almost as though they were a “convenience,” yet standing in judgment unaffected by fact, by reality or accountability.


Using Iraq as an example, the point very much remains:



Since 2001, medical personnel at the Basra hospital in southern Iraq have reported a sharp increase in the incidence of child leukemia and genetic malformation among babies born in the decade following the Gulf War. Iraqi doctors attributed these malformations to possible long-term effects of DU, an opinion that was echoed by several newspapers.[73][125][126][127] In 2004, Iraq had the highest mortality rate due to leukemia of any country.[128] In 2003, the Royal Society called for Western militaries to disclose where and how much DU they had used in Iraq so that rigorous, and hopefully conclusive, studies could be undertaken out in affected areas.[129] The International Coalition to Ban Uranium Weapons (ICBUW) likewise urged that an epidemiological study be made in the Basra region, as asked for by Iraqi doctors,[130] but no peer-reviewed study has yet been undertaken in Basra. A medical survey, "Cancer, Infant Mortality and Birth Sex Ratio in Fallujah, Iraq 2005–2009" published in July 2010, states that the "…increases in cancer and birth defects…are alarmingly high" and that infant mortality 2009/2010 has reached 13.6%. The group compares the dramatic increase, five years after the actual war 2004, or exposure, with the lymphoma Italian peacekeepers[131] developed after the Balkan wars, and the increased cancer risk in certain parts of Sweden due to the Chernobyl fallout. The origin and time of introduction of the carcinogenic agent causing the genetic stress the group will address in a separate report.[132] The report mentions depleted uranium as one "potentially relevant exposure" but makes no conclusions on the source. Four studies in the second half of 2012—one of which described the people of Fallujah as having "the highest rate of genetic damage in any population ever studied"—renewed calls for the US and UK to investigate the possible links between their military assault on the city in 2004 and the explosion in deformities, cancers, and other serious health problems, even though no depleted uranium was found in soil samples taken from Fallujah.


en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 10:54 PM
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originally posted by: Zcustosmorum
Just had a read of this article and thought it raised a few good points but first up:



This week, an American journalist, Serena Shim, from Rochester Hills, Michigan, died in a mysterious accident in Turkey, The Press TV investigative reporter had been threatened by Turkish intelligence only hours before after reporting that ISIL/ISIS was openly receiving military air, weapons, and fighters, through Turkey with the help of an American run NGO. (Non-Governmental Organization)


And a quote from her before her death after coming under accusation of being a spy:



“I’m very surprised at this accusation – I even thought of approaching Turkish intelligence because I have nothing to hide… I am a bit worried, because…Turkey has been labeled by Reporters Without Borders as the largest prison for journalists…so I am frightened about what they might use against me… We were some of the first people on the ground –if not the first people – to get that story of…militants going in through the Turkish border…I’ve got images of them in World Food Organization trucks. It was very apparent that they were militants by their beards, by the clothes they wore, and they were going in there with NGO trucks.”



www.globalresearch.ca...

Now why would an American Non-Governmental Organization be helping ISIS/ISIL and does Obama know about it?

Back to the original article written by this guy:



Gordon Duff is a Marine combat veteran of the Vietnam War that has worked on veterans and POW issues for decades and consulted with governments challenged by security issues. He’s a senior editor and chairman of the board of Veterans Today, especially for the online magazine “New Eastern Outlook”


Some very interesting points are made particularly of a huge explosion on the Kurdish/Syria border town of Kobani:



We asked Jeff Smith to analyze photographic evidence from the recent attack. This was his initial response:

“Not normal weapons, for sure.” Maybe thermite, white phosphor, thermobaric or nuke? The fire ball and the plasmoids of hot metal fragments are most interesting. A Geiger counter and soil samples are the only way of telling for sure.

Normal explosions don’t have fire balls that last that long or are that big. Also spalding material is from the outer bomb casing. Iron or DU (Depleted Uranium) is red. Aluminum, phosphor, or magnesium is white spalding. Thermobarics are always red. Neutron bombs use aluminum casings and are always white.


So is Syria being used as a testing ground for next gen weapons?



If, as Jeff Smith indicates, there is a substantial likelihood that the United States is using nuclear weapon in Syria, whatever the justification, when that same government sanctions another for what most accept as unfounded allegations of nuclear proliferation violations, the misuse of “moral authority” defies comprehension.


That brings us to the most important point of the whole article, it's well known that depleted uranium was used by the U.S. in Iraq & Afghanistam so this news shouldn't be of any real surprise however, when using them constitutes a war crime and allowing your allies the same rules and even helping them as is the case with Israel, there's the ultimate hypocrisy considering:



As a signatory to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, America, in accordance with the 1977 Glenn Amendment, is prohibited by treaty ratified by congress from supplying any aid to nations in violation whether signatory or not.



And as the final words of the article say:



Thus we stand, a nation that has used nuclear weapons in wars of aggression, a nation that turns quickly to such weapons almost as though they were a “convenience,” yet standing in judgment unaffected by fact, by reality or accountability.


journal-neo.org...


I am doubtful about nuke stuff.

However, I am NOT doubtful about Turkish collusion with rebels and ISIS. Turkey has been helping Syrian rebels for several years, including through arming and training them. What is important to realize though is that this is part of a coalition doing so: US, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, and so on.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 11:31 PM
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originally posted by: ArmyOfNobunaga
a reply to: Zcustosmorum

Lol
Sure


And every other nation in the world with satellites are being quiet about it.



I can just see Putin telling his cabinet "yes comrades let's just be quiet about this... America is doing the right thing" looooool


Didn't you know.

Nearly every... No I take that back. "EVERYTHING", that happens in this world.

Earthquakes, volcanoes, super storms, Snow storms, tornadoes, collapsing mountains, dead fish, dead birds, mass murders, school shootings, drugs, cartels, Terror groups, Beheadings, Farts, the rising price of tinfoil, and nearly anything you can think of is done by the CIA and every government and government leader is secretly with the CIA, therefore they get away with it...

Oh and lets not forget that Elvis and MJ are both are still alive and working for the CIA too..!!




posted on Oct, 31 2014 @ 03:40 AM
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a reply to: nukedog

Yes I did which is why I made my comment. How dumb and gullible can you be if you honestly think a nuke would go unnoticed. The USA is hated by the rest of the world right? If we used a nuke it would be the perfect thing countries like Russia/China could use against us to cut us off from the rest of the world.

Nukes leave a very visible footprint when used. Not something that can be used in secret.



posted on Oct, 31 2014 @ 03:53 AM
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originally posted by: ArmyOfNobunaga
a reply to: Zcustosmorum

Lol
Sure


And every other nation in the world with satellites are being quiet about it.



I can just see Putin telling his cabinet "yes comrades let's just be quiet about this... America is doing the right thing" looooool


My thoughts exactly! You can't set off nuclear explosions and not be detected... all countries that are advanced enough to have spy satellites can detect nuclear explosions anywhere on earth!



posted on Oct, 31 2014 @ 03:57 AM
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a reply to: transola

I never said I thought they used a nuke. What am I? The the ordinance chief? How am I going to know? Thank you for your kind words though. I suggest you reread the thread again before you insult people for posting on the internet.

You want to know what I did think? I was thinking hmm I know they use DP all day long. I wonder if they have some sort of crazy new bomb?
edit on 31-10-2014 by nukedog because: (no reason given)

edit on 31-10-2014 by nukedog because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2014 @ 08:45 AM
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a reply to: Zcustosmorum


Regardless of terminology, I classify depleted uranium as nuclear and extremely dangerous


Everyone else on the planet classifies depleted uranium projectiles as "kinetic energy devices." If you think you can legitimately classify them as "nuclear," why can't someone else classify them as "a delicious alternative to butter?"



posted on Oct, 31 2014 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: Zcustosmorum




So do that then instead of rambling on about rooting out crap blah blah blah. I have repeatededly said the article raises good points and you shouldn't be so ignorant as to just dismiss it because the authors theories may seem far-fetched to you, other people have different ideas.

And don't call people conspiracy theorists, it immediately makes me suspicious of you and your motives.


What is it that you're telling me to do? I don't get it. Of course you said the article raises some good points, but it's a whack source. I won't be surprised in the future if (and when) ATS puts Global Research in the same category with Before It's News. Gee-whiz, even an Infowars article would have been a better source, and we all know how often Infowars puts out misleading, exaggerated content. I don't dismiss anything because it sounds far-fetched. I do dismiss horrible sources.

I'm sorry that it offends you, but... Oh well.

Also, that's exactly what we are; we are "conspiracy theorists". Deal with it. Like I said earlier, IMHO, any good conspiracy theorist is akin to the investigative researcher/journalist, i.e., we really push through the crap in an attempt to uncover the truth. Many conspiracy theories of the past have been proven correct. Therefore, despite the way mainstream characterizes us, good conspiracy theorists have done excellent work. No thanks to the sources in the OP.

Perhaps there is even some truth to their claims. Who knows? Maybe there is some substance to the ideas in the OP. I'm just saying that getting a legitimate article out of those references is like winning the 00 in roulette. It can happen, but it's a mighty big gamble.



posted on Oct, 31 2014 @ 04:08 PM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: zazzafrazz

It's very nice to be outraged. Or saddened. Shows you're human.

Now to the crux of the matter...

What to do about it? When the fourth estate, the press, is silenced, we're all silenced to a degree.



This is one thing I have come to as well. I myself went into community work, poverty alleviation, development, to address many of the "evils" in the world.

But, when it comes especially to power and international relations, the media goes by government or corporate desires all of the way.

Whoever controls the mass media, is going to win and is winning. The majority of people don't have the awareness, time, or interest in doing the research necessary to get around the propaganda. Hence, they simply download whatever the media tells them.

To really change things, I feel that we would have to have a communications tool that equaled or surpassed the reach and power of the mass media. Without that, it's almost a lost cause on any issue. The media can be used as an attack dog to make most people think anything, including discrediting any change movements.



posted on Oct, 31 2014 @ 04:18 PM
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Good point about larger nukes.

But someone on the thread said some tactical or mini-nukes are as low as 10 tons of payload. That would put them similar in explosive power to a MOAB.

At that size, could other countries differentiate (as far as richter scale or what have you) between that and a MOAB or a fuel air bomb?


originally posted by: ScientificRailgun
If the U.S. detonated a nuclear device ANYWHERE, the world would know. Fast. Like incredibly fast.

Look at it this way, North Korea can't test a small few dozen kiloton device without everyone knowing. And they test those underground.

On top of that, there are radiation detector networks in most nations that would detect the radioactive byproducts of a nuclear detonation. So depending on wind speed and direction, it would only take a few hours to a few days for some nation somewhere to detect these byproducts.

Long story short, if the U.S. were to detonate a nuke anywhere, there would be a international crapstorm the likes of which haven't been seen since the cuban missile crisis.




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