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DoD agrees on F-35 LRIP 8

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posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 12:20 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I haven`t been following it that closely regarding the whole F-35 saga (only from the corner of my eyes), but how is it now with some of the problems there were?




posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 07:44 AM
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a reply to: BornAgainAlien

Their biggest problem right now is engine burn in. They all have to burn the engines in before they can go back to full envelope flight. Rolls Royce is looking at some solutions, including precutting channels for the turbine blades.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 08:40 AM
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originally posted by: BornAgainAlien
a reply to: Zaphod58

Have you actual seen/heard them in action in real ?

I was wondering on how much noise they have compared to the F-16 which they are going to replace in my country.


It's louder, but I didn't think it was four times as loud as the -16 reported. I thought the F-22 has been louder anytime I've seen them out and about. I should probably add the caveat that I don't believe I saw/heard full burner, but from take off to landing, with a small display in the meantime, it seemed like most large military jet engines. Loud.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 10:04 AM
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originally posted by: BornAgainAlien
a reply to: Zaphod58



I was running a F-16 weapons components warehouse on an airbase (everything expect the explosives and bombs), so I know the level of noise of them pretty well, but I have read about the F35 being much noisier ?



Ten minutes till launch!

wait, I mean lunch. Ten minutes till lunch!

I'm dying of hunger.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 08:46 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: BornAgainAlien

Their biggest problem right now is engine burn in. They all have to burn the engines in before they can go back to full envelope flight. Rolls Royce is looking at some solutions, including precutting channels for the turbine blades.


I wouldn't say it is the biggest problem. There's other issues preventing full envelope testing.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 09:23 PM
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a reply to: 5GenNext

There are other issues but right now they're borescoping every three to six hours until burn in is complete.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 09:28 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: 5GenNext

There are other issues but right now they're borescoping every three to six hours until burn in is complete.


Yes, borescopes are happening around that time line. But the motor is one step of many. Once the motor is greened up and good to go, there are other issues keeping the aircraft from full envelope.
Currently the testing going on it isn't a huge deal, but it will start to be until some modifications get accomplished. There are a few jets that have been done. It's these modifications keeping the G limit low.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 06:03 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Err no not quite gentlemen,

As the press release you quoted Zaph pointed out "cost details will be released once the contract is finalized", so its anyone's guess if they actually stick to it and when that will be. And of course it once again failed to mention that this "price" (whatever the hell that means in F-35 duplicitous marketing speak?) doesn't include the engine or a few other things. Whats more the LRIP 7 engine contract was only finalized mid October this year and puts the unit price at over 26 million each, and that's after cost reductions of a few percent from the previous contract! You can pretty much bank on adding at least 30-50 million per airframe if you want an actual flying F-35. And that puts a whole different spin on it when you have sequestration staring you in the face and a multi-trillion dollar debt.


LEE.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 07:22 AM
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originally posted by: thebozeian
a reply to: Zaphod58
Err no not quite gentlemen,

As the press release you quoted Zaph pointed out "cost details will be released once the contract is finalized", so its anyone's guess if they actually stick to it and when that will be. And of course it once again failed to mention that this "price" (whatever the hell that means in F-35 duplicitous marketing speak?) doesn't include the engine or a few other things. Whats more the LRIP 7 engine contract was only finalized mid October this year and puts the unit price at over 26 million each, and that's after cost reductions of a few percent from the previous contract! You can pretty much bank on adding at least 30-50 million per airframe if you want an actual flying F-35. And that puts a whole different spin on it when you have sequestration staring you in the face and a multi-trillion dollar debt.


It is true they have treated the engine as a separate contract, which is sometimes misleading when the press mentions F-35 costs. It is also true that both the unit cost and the engine costs are decreasing with every new batch (you've admitted), which is the direction you want it to go. The LRIP 8 unit cost is now projected roughly $3M less than estimated a year ago. It's sort of hard to spin that into a negative, but you made a valiant effort.

You'll have the best (only) stealth attack aircraft on the international market delivered to you in six years. That is why people are buying in. Because costs go down as production continues, and the capabilities per dollar make sense while the US eats most of the high costs in the initial batches. There are also several technology and production offsets offered for joining the program at various levels.

I have said many times before that I would have cancelled the program as recently as 6-7 years ago. Including the VTOL requirement led to many sub-optimal design compromises. The program has been a poster child for mismanagement. Delay after delay. LockMart should have been hammered, not rewarded. In a procurement system rife with waste and mismanagement, the F-35 has still managed to stand out.

But we're way past cancellation now. There are well-over 100 airframes already flying. Prices will continue to fall throughout the life cycle of the aircraft just like every other aircraft), and at the end of the day, everyone ends up with a pretty decent airplane with a unique capability. There is nothing else on the market that can offer the same mix of things the F-35 can.



posted on Nov, 1 2014 @ 02:23 AM
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a reply to: BornAgainAlien

I live in Washington DC but my dads boat is right across from Patuxent Naval Air Station. During the week they do a lot of testing with the f-35 flying with the f-18 so I see the f-35 often. The f-35s engine seems to work like a silencer you can't hear it sneaking up to you at all you just hear it when it passes but if I was the enemy I wouldn't hear it because I would be killed before it passed me lol. They also test v-22 Ospreys there's its very cool to watch jets and fish



posted on Nov, 1 2014 @ 02:43 AM
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I'm looking forward to seeing these birds fly from our new carriers, of which the Queen Elizabeth is just starting systems testing in Portsmouth.

Not bad aircraft and all the negative press is standard for this sort of thing. I remember the Tornado and Typhoons being pillared as dead ducks but look how they turned out.



posted on Nov, 2 2014 @ 06:27 PM
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wow they finally getting delivered



posted on Nov, 3 2014 @ 03:21 AM
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The F35C is going on sea trials this November with the USS Nimitz (CVN-68).

www.navytimes.com...



posted on Nov, 3 2014 @ 09:39 PM
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originally posted by: stumason
I'm looking forward to seeing these birds fly from our new carriers, of which the Queen Elizabeth is just starting systems testing in Portsmouth.



originally posted by: pzkw3
The F35C is going on sea trials this November with the USS Nimitz (CVN-68).
www.navytimes.com...


F-35C Completes First Arrested Landing Aboard Aircraft Carrier


edit on 3-11-2014 by FosterVS because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2014 @ 03:21 AM
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a reply to: FosterVS

Thanks FosterVS, enjoyed that video. I could imagine catapult tests would be coming in soon with night tests.
It is going to a busy time for the F35Cs deployed with Nimitz.

Should be a lot of data to go through after this deployment.



posted on Nov, 4 2014 @ 07:15 PM
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a reply to: pzkw3

They were supposed to do a cat shot today, after landing, but there was a problem with connectivity between the aircraft and the ship, so they weren't getting telemetry that they needed, so they scrubbed it.



posted on Nov, 4 2014 @ 08:33 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I saw video of at least two shots today



posted on Nov, 4 2014 @ 08:40 PM
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a reply to: _Del_

Yeah, I realized shortly after posting that the landings were yesterday. That's when they had the telemetry problems and canceled the shots. I just got distracted and didn't fix it.
edit on 11/4/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 4 2014 @ 09:01 PM
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Good to know my country can make good hooks. \o/



posted on Nov, 7 2014 @ 07:05 PM
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The Pentagon and Pratt & Whitney have agreed on costs for the engines. P&W will supply 48 engines, as well as getting lead in monies. Total cost of the deal is $1.05B. The cost breakdown was $793M for engines, and $259M for lead in costs. That brings this batch of engines down a total of 9% over Batch 6 engines. Batch 7 was 4.4% lower, and this batch is an average of 3.5-4.5% lower.

Negotiations for the 9th and 10th batch of engines and aircraft are expected to start in the coming months, and be completed by the fall of next year.




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