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Fast Food in Denmark Serves Something Atypical: Living Wages

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posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 11:54 AM
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In the US of A fastfood workers struggle to make ends meet, yet in Denmark the same fastfood industry pays a fair wage, whats up with that?


COPENHAGEN — On a recent afternoon, Hampus Elofsson ended his 40-hour workweek at a Burger King and prepared for a movie and beer with friends. He had paid his rent and all his bills, stashed away some savings, yet still had money for nights out. That is because he earns the equivalent of $20 an hour — the base wage for fast-food workers throughout Denmark and two and a half times what many fast-food workers earn in the United States. “You can make a decent living here working in fast food,” said Mr. Elofsson, 24. “You don’t have to struggle to get by.”


source
edit on 27-10-2014 by AlaskanDad because: added a few word for clarity




posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 11:56 AM
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a reply to: AlaskanDad

Yet the world hasn't ended in Denmark.....

I will say though the Scandinavian country's are bloody expensive to visit though.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok

Lol's Denmark will be around for awhile longer.



Many American economists and business groups say the comparison is deeply flawed because of fundamental differences between Denmark and the United States, including Denmark’s high living costs and taxes, a generous social safety net that includes universal health care and a collective bargaining system in which employer associations and unions work together. The fast-food restaurants here are also less profitable than their American counterparts.


Could be in the US of A that corporate profits are more important than easily replaceable workers?



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:10 PM
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The Danish also get 5-8 weeks holiday each year. The Danes have high depression and suicide rates. With all that vacation and great wages, Danes still aren't all that happy. Who would've guessed? And it's darn expensive in Denmark. People in India only get .50cents and hour but I don't see people clamoring to jump on THAT boat. Denmark only has 5 1/2 million people. They have a super high tax base and the government supplements workers wages with a pension if they make less than around $49,000 a year. What works for a small city doesn't always work for a large one.
edit on 27-10-2014 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:19 PM
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originally posted by: StoutBroux
The Danish also get 5-8 weeks holiday each year. The Danes have high depression and suicide rates. With all that vacation and great wages, Danes still aren't all that happy. Who would've guessed? And it's darn expensive in Denmark.


Really, Danes are not happy?


1. Denmark

Denmark came in first place as the happiest country in the world in the 2013 happiness report and one of the happiest places in Denmark must surely be Tivoli Gardens. One of the world's oldest amusement parks, Tivoli Gardens will reopen on April 10 for the season to throngs of native and foreign visitors. If a calmer Copenhagen is more your preference, visit the King's Garden at Rosenborg Castle, a popular spot for locals to picnic during the summertime.

source


4. Denmark

Like other Scandinavian countries, Denmark's government plays a large role in the lives of its citizens — the country has high tax rates and a comprehensive welfare system. The government's total spending was equal to nearly 58% of GDP in 2013, second only to Finland. Excellent work-life balance likely contributed to Danes' life satisfaction. Danes devoted an average of 16 hours a day to leisure activities and personal care, more than any other nation reviewed. Country-residents are also well-educated, having spent an average of 19.2 years in school, third-highest among countries reviewed. When asked if they could count on someone in times of need, 96% of Danish residents responded affirmatively, compared with less than 90% across the OECD.

source

Now I ask you, where does the US of A rate in happiness?



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:25 PM
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originally posted by: AlaskanDad
a reply to: crazyewok

Lol's Denmark will be around for awhile longer.



Many American economists and business groups say the comparison is deeply flawed because of fundamental differences between Denmark and the United States, including Denmark’s high living costs and taxes, a generous social safety net that includes universal health care and a collective bargaining system in which employer associations and unions work together. The fast-food restaurants here are also less profitable than their American counterparts.


Could be in the US of A that corporate profits are more important than easily replaceable workers?




The corporate tax rate there is 25% if memory serves. Much lower than the usa. But the people get a 25% vat tax to make up the difference.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:26 PM
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a reply to: Hoosierdaddy71

But if it works for them and they are happy? Who is the USA to try and tell them better?



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:31 PM
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What's hilarious about the entire fast food thing, is in my town at any given time there are 20 people working at McDonalds, a one window drive thru. It's not a big city either, and I am sure that Denmark probably hire's half or less the amount of people who can do the same job but well, and pay's them what they would have had to pay all of the people.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok

So who says they should change?
They can do whatever they want to do with their
6 million population.
Not to sure it would work in the usa.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: iclimbtowers

That's crazy talk!



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:36 PM
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a reply to: AlaskanDad
I saw that on a IT search.
Did you also see that Denmark has one of the highest suicide rates....still? Happy suiciders I guess.


Worldwide surveys have consistently ranked the Scandinavian countries — with their generous family-leave policies, low crime, free health care, rich economies and, yes, high income taxes — as the happiest places on earth. But this happiness has always been accompanied by a paradox: the happiest countries also seem to have the highest suicide rates.healthland.time.com...


There are tons of articles about the depression and suicide rates in Denmark. But here's a thought:


Economists from the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, the University of Warwick in England and Hamilton College in New York examined life satisfaction scores provided by 2.3 million Americans state by state, and comparing these with state suicide rates. Utah, for example, ranks highest in life satisfaction — but also has the ninth highest suicide rate in the U.S. The No. 2 happiest state is Hawaii, which comes in fifth for suicides. New York, in contrast, comes in 45th in life satisfaction but has America’s lowest suicide rate. Same site as above.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:38 PM
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Livable wages working in fast food? I feel sorry for those people they must be living in some kind of Socialist hell. Maybe one day they will enjoy the freedoms our fast food workers here in the states enjoy. Because there's nothing like having to decide between paying rent or buying food to make you really appreciate the capitalist system. Besides anyone that works in fast food is either too lazy or too stupid to succeed so they should appreciate the scraps they are given.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:41 PM
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originally posted by: Hoosierdaddy71

Not to sure it would work in the usa.


Very unlikely in my honest opinion. Opposing partisan politics sides would rip the country apart over such radical changes.

It may work at the state level MAYBE but at a federal level you would see a civil war 2.0



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: AlaskanDad
in Denmark the same fastfood industry pays a fair wage, whats up with that?


fastfood in denmark is a gourmet meal ..it brings in top dollar
Europe’s food experts confuse McDonald’s with gourmet food

edit on 27-10-2014 by ShadowChatter because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: StoutBroux

And that means what?

They should be given lower wages and less holiday? That will make the happier?


I dont see how the suicide rate correlates with there economy here.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: buster2010


North Korea and India are socialist. Nobody goes hungry there do they? So maybe no system is perfect.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:45 PM
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originally posted by: Hoosierdaddy71
a reply to: buster2010


North Korea and India are socialist. Nobody goes hungry there do they? So maybe no system is perfect.


I think the point is you can get capitalist hells and capitalist heavens and socialist hells and solecist heavens.

Both system can work. It depends on how its implemented and what fit the people living there.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:46 PM
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originally posted by: Hoosierdaddy71

originally posted by: AlaskanDad
a reply to: crazyewok

Lol's Denmark will be around for awhile longer.



Many American economists and business groups say the comparison is deeply flawed because of fundamental differences between Denmark and the United States, including Denmark’s high living costs and taxes, a generous social safety net that includes universal health care and a collective bargaining system in which employer associations and unions work together. The fast-food restaurants here are also less profitable than their American counterparts.


Could be in the US of A that corporate profits are more important than easily replaceable workers?




The corporate tax rate there is 25% if memory serves. Much lower than the usa. But the people get a 25% vat tax to make up the difference.



Denmark Personal Income Tax Rate 1995-2014 | Data | Chart | Calendar

The Personal Income Tax Rate in Denmark stands at 55.60 percent. Personal Income Tax Rate in Denmark averaged 61.40 percent from 1995 until 2014, reaching an all time high of 65.90 percent in 1997 and a record low of 55.40 percent in 2010. Personal Income Tax Rate in Denmark is reported by the Danish Central Tax Administration. www.tradingeconomics.com...


2013 tax rate

Denmark has a complex system of personal income tax that includes:
◾a labour market contribution of 8% of your entire income (employees and self-employed workers)
◾a deduction before any tax is due: personal allowance of DKK 42,000 (under 18 DKK 31,500) for municipal taxes, health contributions of 6% and bottom-bracket tax of 5.83%
◾highest tax bracket of 15% on income above DKK 421,900
◾municipal income tax and church tax – payable at flat rates, which vary depending on where you live (average 2011 rate: 25.7%)
◾social security contributions.

In total, no person must pay more than (2013 rate) 51.5% in national and municipal taxes combined.
europa.eu...
edit on 27-10-2014 by StoutBroux because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:49 PM
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a reply to: StoutBroux

You don't say. So why does this link say that Denmark's suicide rank is 41 out of the world at 11.3% out of 100,000 people? Also, the United States is higher at rank 34 with 12% out of 100,000 people. Your point fails.
edit on 27-10-2014 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: Hoosierdaddy71
a reply to: buster2010


North Korea and India are socialist. Nobody goes hungry there do they? So maybe no system is perfect.

You do know there are many different kinds of Socialism right? Here's a link read up on it a little.
Socialism




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