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You Can Fit Every Planet in the Solar System Between Earth and the Moon

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posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 09:43 PM
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Just my 2 cents, but:

If we (or someone else) had the technology to move planets at a whim, it would mean we'd be able to stop it in it's tracks, and move it without the HUGE amounts of energy that would involve, meaning a way to make it "massless", and that would mean having a way so that their gravity would not cause any problems.

But then, there is Jupiter's massive magnetic field, which is much, much more powerful than Earth's and we'd be in it, but again, I would imagine having the tech to move planets around, might mean being able to control that too.

Of course I'm merely speculating here.

Especially since it's just a thought exercise to show the size of the planets in comparison of the distance between Earth and our moon.

I mean if you really want to see Jupiter or Saturn close up, I would think it would be easier to just set up a "moon" base on one the moons in orbit around those planets.





posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 10:34 PM
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If this was interesting to you this link will blow your mind. An incredibly accurate and stunning map of the solar system if the moon was the size of 1 pixel. Enjoy

joshworth.com...



posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 10:58 PM
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a reply to: rtreyna



that site was fun it goes to show the scale of our solar system thanks



posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 11:03 PM
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a reply to: rtreyna

Very cool link! Thanks for posting it!

I need to get several monitors hooked up to see the whole thing!





posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 11:14 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

when I read the thread title I was thinking 'this is crazy' but hadn't really thought about it before
sometimes the full moons appear to be so much closer

guess its just a matter of perspective


edit on 26-10-2014 by blacktie because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2014 @ 11:29 PM
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originally posted by: Unity_99
I actually think the solar system is alot bigger than they are charting.

Interesting. Do you have a reason for thinking this? What inconsistencies do YOU see with the standard model of the solar system that makes you think this?

Right now, the solar system, including the hypothesized Oort cloud, is 2 light years in diameter. Some astronomers hypothesis that it may be 4 or 6 LY in diameter -- i.e., the outer edge of the Oort cloud may extend anywhere between 1 LY and 3 LY out from the sun. Going by an average of those sizes, that means the astronomers think that the outer edge of the Oort cloud/outer edge of the solar system may be at least half way to the next closest star.

What specific reasons have you worked out/observations have you made that makes you think it is bigger than that?


edit on 10/26/2014 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 04:25 AM
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The next chart or graphic I'd like to see is the size of the planets in the sky if all of them were as close to us (or as far) as the moon.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 04:37 AM
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This is really cool, but in my mind I think it may just be a part of the harmony of the solar system.

The diameters of the planets added up may not be as exact, but the masses of the planets added up is something, some number.

Maybe that's the number that makes the moon as far away as it is? Given the clockwork nature of the SOl system, it is perfectly reasonable to suggest that the sum mass of the planets in any system may indeed serve as a 'baseline' for all measurements of orbital mechanics that arise.

In other words, maybe the moon is exactly as far away as it needs to be.
edit on 27-10-2014 by JayDub113 because: Yeah know that I think about it ...someone should do some solar system math. We

edit on 27-10-2014 by JayDub113 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 04:54 AM
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a reply to: lostbook
Interesting fact.. puts things into perspective.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 12:43 PM
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originally posted by: Unity_99
I actually think the solar system is alot bigger than they are charting.

Based on what? Amateur astronomers can see the planets and measure their sizes too. And the distance to the moon has been well established as well, not only by validation of its orbit but even by direct measurement using earth-moon-earth radio wave bouncing.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 01:51 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
Why would you want to do that?


I wanted to do it to try and take over the world, but Pinky pointed out the fatal flaw in my plan when he said, "Wouldn't gravity cause all the planets to merge into one big planet and destroy civilization as we know it? NARF!".

In the meantime, I ponder it as an interesting thought exercise.
edit on 27-10-2014 by Junkheap because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: rtreyna

Now that was cool.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 02:25 PM
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Just amazing how far the moon actually is from earth...




posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 03:18 PM
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originally posted by: drneville
Just amazing how far the moon actually is from earth...





I don't get how the moon can look so big if it's smaller than the Earth then?



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 12:13 AM
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a reply to: MystikMushroom

Distance Moon = 380 000 km (average)
Diameter Moon = 3 500 km

If you put everything in scale, the moon would be 3.5 cm at a viewing distance 3.8 m, so it's perfect visible.
The moon looks big, now hold a 3.5 cm coin in front of it at 3.8 m



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 05:06 AM
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originally posted by: MystikMushroom

originally posted by: drneville
Just amazing how far the moon actually is from earth...





I don't get how the moon can look so big if it's smaller than the Earth then?

Optical illusion. The full moon occupies just 0.5 degrees in the sky (which is 180 degrees from horizon to horizon vertically).



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 08:05 AM
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originally posted by: Aleister
The next chart or graphic I'd like to see is the size of the planets in the sky if all of them were as close to us (or as far) as the moon.


How about this




posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 08:33 AM
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a reply to: lostbook
It's interesting, but I'm glad they mentioned this in relation to the Moon's average distance from Earth because it does vary quite a bit.

However, I'm puzzled, because their statement is false anyway. The reason is that Earth-Moon distance is measured center to center. So if they subtract those two radiuses, then the net distance is obviously less and in fact the correct calculation (at average distance) won't give the result they claim. The Earth's equatorial diameter is 12,756 km, giving a radius of 6,378 km. That needs to be deducted to give a net distance (to the Moon's center). We don't even need to worry about subtracting the Moon's much smaller diameter, because if they only have 4,392 km to spare at their given average distance, then they're already almost 2,000 km less that what's needed -- even with all the planets (and the Moon) touching.



posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 01:52 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

This is INSANE!

The numbers are here, but I'm still trying to wrap my head around this!




posted on Oct, 30 2014 @ 01:58 PM
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a reply to: wmd_2008

Perfect, thank you. So small, except for the two 'giants' and the Budweiser truck at the end (still trying to convince people that it's beer).



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