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5,500 Year-old Circular Pyramid in Peru is Evidence of *new* Oldest Civilization in Americas

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posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 05:35 PM
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Archaeologists have uncovered a ceremonial center containing a circular step pyramid, a structure they're calling the "Throne of the Lord of Miravalles," and a central ceremonial stone at the Miravalles site, in the province of San Miguel, Cajamarca, (northern) Peru. It was announced by researcher Victor Colan, in a press conference on the 21st, that the site has been dated to 5,500 ya which would make it at least 500 years older than the sacred city of Caral, one of the most-studied sites of the Norte Chico civilization which has only in recent years come to be recognized as the oldest civilization in the Americas.

The circular pyramid consists of three platforms, with the largest being about 30m in diamter. Unfortunately, no images were provided with the original Epoch Times source but here is an image of one of two very similar (related) circular pyramid structures found in Jaen, also in Cajamarca:

Circular pyramid at Jaen (img source)

From Ancient Origins (via Obscuragator):


The discovery was announced by research Victor Colan at a Peruvian press conference on 21st October. Colan revealed that the research team found a ceremonial center and a circular step-pyramid (known in Peru as Huacas), with three platforms 30 meters in diameter. The pyramid resembles two other circular Huacas found in Jaen, also in the Cajamarca region. The structure had large semi-circular walls built with a mixture of mud mortar and stones up to 200 kg in weight.


There's not much else to be found quite yet on the web. However, in my searches I came across a 2008 article about the discovery of a similarly ancient structure by a team of German and Peruvian archaeologists, at a site called Sechin Bajo which is also in northern Peru.

Here is a picture of the circular plaza at Sechin Bajo from Foros Peru:



Reading about it, I was reminded of the circular plaza at the base of the ruins of Caral. Here is a picture of Caral from a blog called Ancient Archives:



Apparently I was on to something and my confirmation came from National Geographic:


Other sites in the Norte Chico Valley, roughly 150 miles (240 kilometers) south of Sechin Bajo, date to about the same period.

"These projects also have early dates and sunken circular plazas, a defining feature of the Preceramic era," said Nelson, who was not involved in the latest dig.

The function of these circular plazas, as argued by researchers working at Preceramic sites, "seems to be associated with monumental architecture or [shortened] pyramids, and probably are civil or ceremonial in function," she said.


"We are discovering more and more that this late Preceramic and Late Archaic period was a time of real culture revolution on the Andean coast," said Jonathan Haas of the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois.

"It was a time when the Andes became distinct, an uninterrupted cultural chain going through the central coast in an unbroken fashion for 5,000 years—all the way up to the Inca," he said.


What sets the Cajamarca sites apart from the Norte Chico sites and Sechin Bajo to me seems to be the absence of a circular plaza and the circular pyramids which differ from the earthen step pyramids found at sites like Caral consisting of square platforms.
edit on 2014-10-24 by theantediluvian because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 05:37 PM
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Peru continues to provide us with more interesting newly found cultures!



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 05:40 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

I am sure the experts who dedicate their lives to this are in the know and I simply am mot...

BUT

Circular pyramids like this structure are usually dedicated to the rain Gods of what ever name they go by depending on the particular culture in question.

I think its a left over tradition from the Olmecs. Rain dieties get circular structures, with wood and straw roofs in a cone shape.

I may be wrong. Heres hoping I am!



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 05:41 PM
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a reply to: Hanslune

Peru is chock full of amazing ancient sites! Peru and Turkey are both high on my list of countries I most want to visit because of the density of interesting ruins.



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 05:47 PM
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a reply to: tadaman

Another civilization notable for their construction of circular step pyramids is the Teuchitlan tradition of Mexico (~300 BC - 900 AD). Here's a model of one of their sites, Guachimontones:




posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 06:04 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

True true.

"The place where men become GODS" Lol.

If I remember corectly their grain storage buildings were circular very tall wood and straw with circular stone bases.

Its my favorite ancinet culture of the Americas after the Olmec.



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 06:11 PM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian
a reply to: Hanslune

Peru is chock full of amazing ancient sites! Peru and Turkey are both high on my list of countries I most want to visit because of the density of interesting ruins.


Meso America is not bad either as is the ME (a tad difficult to travel there now) but Turkey is still okay.You can still do Turkey, Cyprus, Greece and Italy (especially Sicily and Sardinia, Malta and Tunisia in safety).
edit on 24/10/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 06:38 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

I seldom have anything of value to say, but I just want to let you know I look each day for new threads by you covering these discoveries!
You always add pictures ( I hate clicking on links
) and such comprehensive information.
This is another new- to me anyway- site I hadn't heard about before.

Good brain food! Thank you!

edit on 500000066America/Chicago311 by nugget1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 07:10 PM
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That's actually pretty old...

I do think it's odd that people think it's weird there aren't much older remains left, remains that might be proof of even older civilizations.
Cause if this is what you get from 5,500 year old stuff, what would ruins 10,000 year old look like ? While mostly all would be underneath lots of water.

Interesting find. S&F



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 07:24 PM
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originally posted by: Hanslune

originally posted by: theantediluvian
a reply to: Hanslune

Peru is chock full of amazing ancient sites! Peru and Turkey are both high on my list of countries I most want to visit because of the density of interesting ruins.


Meso America is not bad either as is the ME (a tad difficult to travel there now) but Turkey is still okay.You can still do Turkey, Cyprus, Greece and Italy (especially Sicily and Sardinia, Malta and Tunisia in safety).


My wife and I keep saying we're going to see the Mediterranean but we never seem to be able to get away from our jobs long enough to make it worthwhile. A week or so is fine for a vacation in the Caribbean but if we're going to travel that far, I'd like to have a few weeks to spend abroad.



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 07:45 PM
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a reply to: nugget1

No problem. Ancient civilizations fascinate me and enjoy sharing what I find. Thanks for reading!



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 08:01 PM
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a reply to: Sinter Klaas


While mostly all would be underneath lots of water.


Considering the mankind's proclivity for settling near water, much that would have existed along the world's coastlines before the end of the last Ice Age is submerged. Even a lot of land that was't necessarily near the coasts is underwater. I keep meaning to put together a thread about some of these: Doggerland, Sundaland and the land lost when outburst floods refilled the Caspian and Black seas.



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 08:02 PM
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I just got home from an archaeological tour of Peru. (I'm a tour director). I've done the tour many times.

We spend a lot of time in Northern Peru---a place most tourists don't go. There are so many unearthed ruins there that no one will ever have the money or the time to uncover them all. When you're driving down the road, you see all these small hills and they're actually achaeological sites. They're just everywhere.

Peru is still a place of Indiana Jones-like adventure.

Most people only know the Incas when it comes to past Peruvian civilizations---but there were many, many more. I have pics if you're ever interested.
edit on 24-10-2014 by MRuss because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: MRuss


Peru is still a place of Indiana Jones-like adventure.


That's exactly what I think the modern world is often lacking — Indiana Jones-like adventure! Also, that sounds like an awesome job. You should definitely put together a thread sometime and share some of your pictures, I know there are quite a few among us who would love to see them!




posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 09:20 PM
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Origins of Atlantis/Lemuria Myths Part-1
a reply to: theantediluvian

I'd like to offer you a link by slayer68 where he's starts this journey.

I've got more, but if I hit the jackpot on topic, let me know. So I can share lots more


Origins of Atlantis/Lemuria Myths Part-1

edit on 10/24/2014 by Sinter Klaas because: link



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 09:40 PM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian

originally posted by: Hanslune

originally posted by: theantediluvian
a reply to: Hanslune

Peru is chock full of amazing ancient sites! Peru and Turkey are both high on my list of countries I most want to visit because of the density of interesting ruins.


Meso America is not bad either as is the ME (a tad difficult to travel there now) but Turkey is still okay.You can still do Turkey, Cyprus, Greece and Italy (especially Sicily and Sardinia, Malta and Tunisia in safety).


My wife and I keep saying we're going to see the Mediterranean but we never seem to be able to get away from our jobs long enough to make it worthwhile. A week or so is fine for a vacation in the Caribbean but if we're going to travel that far, I'd like to have a few weeks to spend abroad.


Just gonna have to bite the bullet and take the time! I'd say that Cappadocia, Athens, Knossus, Pompeii and all of Sicily are well worth the trip, take a house in Crete, Cyprus or on the west coast of Sicily for a month.



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 09:43 PM
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originally posted by: MRuss


There are thousands of un-excavated mounds in the vicinity of 'fertile crescent' (southern Turkey, northern Syria and Iraq) - a century of work there if you add in the associated regions, multiple centuries.
edit on 24/10/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 09:51 PM
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originally posted by: theantediluvian
a reply to: MRuss


Peru is still a place of Indiana Jones-like adventure.


That's exactly what I think the modern world is often lacking — Indiana Jones-like adventure! Also, that sounds like an awesome job. You should definitely put together a thread sometime and share some of your pictures, I know there are quite a few among us who would love to see them!



Just like to say yes please... to his suggestion, I am always looking for the off the beaten path get away..



posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 10:03 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

Hmm.




posted on Oct, 24 2014 @ 10:07 PM
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originally posted by: Irishhaf

That's exactly what I think the modern world is often lacking — Indiana Jones-like adventure! Also, that sounds like an awesome job. You should definitely put together a thread sometime and share some of your pictures, I know there are quite a few among us who would love to see them!


Just like to say yes please... to his suggestion, I am always looking for the off the beaten path get away..


Not much for archaeology but Haida Gwaii is great get away from the world. Another I did that was certain soul changing was to walk from Mumbai to Ahmednugar in Maharashtra.
edit on 24/10/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



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