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Airbus attempts to take on the 757

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posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 09:38 AM
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Airbus is reportedly in "active talks" with a launch customer for an A321neo designed to take on the Boeing 757-200. The plan calls for an increased MTOW, to 194,000 pounds. The redesign would reportedly be able to carry 240 passengers compared to the 239 of the 757, as well as travel farther than the 757 with 160 passengers on board. With that load, and blended winglets, the 757 can travel almost 4,000 nm. The best current A321, even with an extra fuel tank installed, falls well short of that range. Airbus believes that it can beat the 757s range by 100 nm.


Airbus is aiming to introduce a higher-weight version of the A321neo in early 2019, in a bid to reinforce the type’s challenge to the Boeing 757 market.

It has previously detailed four sub-variants for the A321neo, with maximum take-off weights ranging from 89t to 93.5t.

But the airframer states that it will present a 97t version with “true transatlantic range”, featuring 164 seats including 20 lie-flat beds in a business-class cabin.

The aircraft will achieve 25% lower cost per seat compared with the 757, it adds.

www.flightglobal.com...




posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 10:23 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I imagine there isn't much competition in that market segment anyway. Boeing stopped building 757's in 2004 and apparently decided there wasn't enough market demand to build a replacement for that segment in favor of their 737 family.
It's also interesting Airbus is having to modify a brand new jet to compete with a jet that is 23 years old now.



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 10:24 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

They're working on a 757 replacement, but they just started to work on it in 2012.



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

That explains why Airbus wants to get a foot hold in dominating that market before Boeing gets ramped up.



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 04:52 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Sammamishman

They're working on a 757 replacement, but they just started to work on it in 2012.


what's wrong with a 787 for that application? sure it's two aisles but otherwise why not?

never mind: looked up take off weight and 787-8 is almost 2x 757-200.
edit on 22-10-2014 by mbkennel because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 05:14 PM
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a reply to: mbkennel

The single aisle is becoming extremely popular with the airlines. They're cheaper initially, slightly cheaper to operate anymore, and have the range they're after.



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 06:17 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Yeah Boeing needs to bridge that gap between the 737 and the 787. Particularly now that the 757 is gone and I don't think they have built or sold a passenger version of the 767 in at least 12 months. Something in the 200-260 passenger bracket is needed. At the moment if you look at average 2 class layouts there is over a 100-120 seat gap in Seattle's lineup. If they could offer it with a range of around 3500-4500nm or maybe an ER type with up to 5000nm or so range then it would plug the gap nicely and allow some interesting city pairs for operators. I would be interested to see what they are going to come up with. have you seen any specs or renderings Zaph?

LEE.



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 06:21 PM
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a reply to: thebozeian

They've tossed a couple around but nothing concrete yet. It'll probably be in the 275 seat area, with close to a 4500 nm range if I had to guess.



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 06:31 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
BUT, the single aisle has its own set of problems as well. And ironically these also cause and will continue to cause headaches for the same operators who like them and airports, namely that a single aisle takes more time per seat to board/de-board and service the cabin than a comparable twin aisle would. Currently there is a very tightly controlled "dance" that ground services must do with the 737 in order to ensure that passengers leave, and catering and cleaners can function with only one aisle before the next load of passengers arrive. And of course we have all dealt with the frustration of having to stop while some clueless halfwit tries to stuff everything bar the kitchen sink in the overhead lockers thereby blocking the only aisle. That's why Boeing has studied and lodged some patents a few years back for a wide body twin aisle in the 737 size range.

LEE.



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 06:35 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Yeah that makes sense seating and range wise. I wonder why they seem to be dragging their feet a little on this one though? Perhaps they have had full hands with the 787 and 747 issues, not to mention the 737MAX/follow on aircraft?



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 06:36 PM
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a reply to: thebozeian

I know it's a pain but the airlines are going for them more and more lately. There have been some pretty interesting articles discussing wide bodies vs narrow bodies and the popularity of narrow bodies too.
edit on 10/22/2014 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I know it's a long shot but how about a blended wing body jet?
Would be cool to see the airliner "tube with wings" mold be broken finally.



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 07:48 PM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

I don't think that we'll see that for passenger flight.



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: Sammamishman
a reply to: Zaphod58

It's also interesting Airbus is having to modify a brand new jet to compete with a jet that is 23 years old now.


You can't really read anything into that. Firstly the A320 family has also been around for more than 25 years (757 is 32 years old, not 23) and secondly, the A320 family is equivalent to the 737 family, this plan by Airbus to create a 757 replacement is no different to if Boeing launched a modified 737MAX for the same purpose.



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 01:11 PM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Sammamishman

I don't think that we'll see that for passenger flight.


Why not? Would be comfortable inside.

Wouldn't the plasma drag reduction work much better too---more surface to work with. Reduce fuel burn is huge for operators.



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 01:22 PM
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a reply to: mbkennel

If you take a tube design and find the center of the nose, and draw a line through to the tail, you have the roll axis center. Every turn will rotate around that line.

In a tube design, every seat on the plane is near that line. When you make turns the people on the ends don't notice much, even though they're at an angle.

On a BWB the seats will extend out into the wings farther. That puts those seats much farther from the center point. The seats farther out will notice the roll much that items on the seat tray will slide off.



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