It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Pocket Chainsaw

page: 1
10

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 07:45 PM
link   
Let me say I don't have any bug out bag, or even a bug out plan. My only plan would be to get in touch with family and try to meet up.

How ever i do try to 'sponge' everything that i hear about survival related.

If you're a hardcore survivalist, this guy, CrazyRussianHacker on youtube is your man. I'll post another one of his videos in case you want a little more.







posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 07:51 PM
link   
I gotta try that orange candle/


edit on 21-10-2014 by canucks555 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 07:52 PM
link   
Got the saw about 2 weeks ago from Army Surplus.

10.95

Works great!

Peace



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 07:57 PM
link   
I could chop that piece of wood with a full size axe in about one or two swings using less calories. A hatchet might take a little more.

The tradeoff is it's size and portability so it all comes down to what situation you're in. If you didn't have enough energy to swing an axe you probably don't have enough for your pocket chainsaw either.

Would you really feel safe in a survival situation with this guy? I wouldn't.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 08:11 PM
link   
a reply to: eisegesis

Ha, you base your trust on this one idea. Rebuttal = axe or hatchet would be a bit more hassle to lag around.

Either way, you're right on it depends what sort of survival situation you're in. All i can say is, i've seen enough of this guys videos to know that 'Yes', i would very much appreciate if he was my zombie killing partner.
edit on 21-10-2014 by thirdcoast because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 08:25 PM
link   
They definitely work well but in 30+ years of camping, hunting & prepping I have never felt the need to carry one.
It's just one more thing to carry and although it don't seem to weigh much all those little "it don't weigh much" items add up quick.

Everywhere I have lived including Michigan, Arizona, Wyoming, Montana, California, Indiana has had more than enough wood already down and dead that I have never had to cut wood to survive. unless your building a cabin then you can break dead wood off by hand big enough to burn or build a shelter.

Everybody should carry what they are comfortable with and that they like having with them, I just don't need one.

What you carry is a very personal and individualized choice.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 08:39 PM
link   
It does look like a handy tool. If I had to choose between one or the other, though, I would go with a hatchet. It is a more multipurpose tool.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 08:40 PM
link   
a reply to: thirdcoast


It is super cheap and easy to make high distance radios... No reason contacting family should be a problem if the # goes down... proverbially.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 08:43 PM
link   
a reply to: ArmyOfNobunaga

Lets be honest btw..... The apocalypse comes... whats easier to maintain over the long haul? A pocket chainsaw or a hatchet and ax? Think long term guys. I own about 20 hatchets and axes and I expect they will last 4 generations in my family.
edit on 21-10-2014 by ArmyOfNobunaga because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 09:07 PM
link   
a reply to: ArmyOfNobunaga
I like hatchets and axes. Makes me feel more manly.
I use my my great grandfather's carpenter hatchet.
It is a treasure to me.


edit on 21-10-2014 by skunkape23 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 09:18 PM
link   
a reply to: skunkape23

Even though its against opsec Ill tell you I have my grandfathers hatchets and axes from Arkansas... they will last another 300 years if civilization does. They are treasure to me too.

I didn't meant to poo poo on the thread... I have had saws like this as well. But they are not easy to sharpen and will not last 25 years imo. Hand saws have their place and you can turn out good firewood and sheltter fast. Just don't expect them to be generational keepsakes.


The one hand saw I have left I us for primitive camping. IT works well. Great thread.


edit on 21-10-2014 by ArmyOfNobunaga because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 01:01 AM
link   
For cutting wood alone, I would rather use the pocket chainsaw, granted that it worked repeatedly and did not break. I've seen those cheap survival saws before, which are the same in principle, and they will break extremely easily. There are a lot of cheap survival tools on the market that I would recommend one to avoid. It is better to spend a little bit more and get something that will last, if you are going to use it in a survival situation at least. Just for messing around it would not be important.

The main reason I would prefer the saw to a hatchet or axe would be for the clean cut and ease of use. But I am not that proficient with an axe. If one were an expert with an axe then I'm sure they could use it better than myself, but I know that I could cut something faster with a saw. If you are cutting something for firewood then obviously it would not matter how pretty the resulting product turns out, but sometimes you need a flat surface, which the saw could give you. I suppose one might be able to get a flat surface with a chopping instrument, but I think it would be much easier with a cutting instrument. Also, the battery and steel wool is in my opinion the quickest and easiest way to start a fire, granted that you keep the necessary materials in your survival kit. This is of course without an instrument that produces a flame directly. You don't really need the cotton balls as long as you have some paper-thin bark or moss, or some type of tinder. Would the battery and gum wrapper work with tin foil do you think? I was thinking that perhaps the gum wrapper is used because it has more resistance than tin foil, and thus it generates enough heat to create a flame, where tin foil might not.

Honestly though, if one has a survival kit that they've made themselves, there will likely be no need to carry around all types of stuff for making fires. It is of course good information to have if you find yourself with an odd assortment of supplies for some reason. If all else fails, you can always use the tried and true method of friction. I would prefer some string and a piece of wood for a bow, and an axle stick and a rock to act as a joint or pivot point. It is not easy to do in my opinion, and if one is a survivalist they should practice it in their free time. I'm not a survivalist or prepper, but I grew up in the middle of nowhere, and was constantly doing woodsman type stuff. If I found myself in a survival situation I would probably join up with a pack of wolves or coyotes. My human intelligence, plus their utter lack of respect for any life whatsoever, says we should do pretty well together. If they don't eat me first.



posted on Oct, 22 2014 @ 08:37 AM
link   
a reply to: thirdcoast

I have one of those chainsaws, but I tie it to a rope and use it to limb branches that are higher up than I like to climb and normally wouldn't be able to reach.



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 01:46 AM
link   

originally posted by: QuietSpeech
a reply to: thirdcoast

I have one of those chainsaws, but I tie it to a rope and use it to limb branches that are higher up than I like to climb and normally wouldn't be able to reach.


One rope tied to the chain? A rope on either side?

Either way, sounds innovative.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 10:34 PM
link   
a reply to: thirdcoast

You should have gotten more flags for this post. Especially the second video where the guy makes a candle out of an orange, for Gods sakes, it's food AND light and also makes a two battery flashlight run with one battery and foil. Seriously awesome videos, thanks for sharing. I love hacks like these.



posted on Oct, 29 2014 @ 11:05 PM
link   
For years i had a old frame saw with a chain saw blade.
woodwork.ars-informatica.ca...

Worked real good and i could take it apart and put it in a backpack.



posted on Nov, 2 2014 @ 09:13 PM
link   
those pocket chainsaw do have their place,, they are quiet,, hatchets and axes can be heard over a couple of miles away, as can the repeating blows of a big rock hammering in a wooden stake in the ground, and such, you may not want to make noise.. a homemade chainsaw can be made ,but it will cut in one direction only , just like a hacksaw or file,, chainsaws are easy to sharpen with a round file takes a little practice is all.you can carry a bowsaw blade and cut a limb for the bow, have a couple of nuts and bolts to go through bowsaw blade holes.be very carefull with axe and even more careful with a hatchet ,which is far closer to a finger or foot than a axe is. either one can sever a artery and you bleed out and die.i would chose a axe with a looong handle, and practice with it now. as mwood said , plenty of dead wood laying around in the REAL woods for a fire, if its too long just lay it across fire and let it burn in half.
edit on 2-11-2014 by madokie because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-11-2014 by madokie because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
10

log in

join