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Should students have business administration in highschool instead of college?

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posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 02:54 PM
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Do you think that teaching business administration in highschool would help to foster an enviornment of entrepanuerialship?

Should we be start focusing on small business practices in highschool and elementary school to bring business back to the U.S.?

Do you have any ideas on how we can start creating an enviornment conducive to small business in the United states instead of creating a bunch of sheep looking for jobs in mega corps that have only their best interests at hand?




posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 02:58 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

lets work on getting kids to finish whats already there before we decide to add more to the pile.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:00 PM
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a reply to: TzarChasm

I don't want to add I want to change. I'm thinking they are having a problem with their schoolwork due to lack of privation.

I THINK IT starts with the parents. They see their parents working hard for nothing, miserable, fighting, struggling to pay bills and it turns the, off because parents are raised in the same systems.

Also I think we're dealing with serious abandonment issues in large scale due to the way the system invades the family and regulates everything and how little parents atake an interests in their kids lives these days.
edit on 10/21/2014 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:00 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

?,?,?...

3 questions and nothing else...

Well done!

What we need to teach in High school is the concept of Social Capital - as soon as that paradigm is instilled into our youth, the Business side of things can be focused on.

bowlingalone.com...




posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:03 PM
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This would be fantastic. I do believe it would have to have a great bit of volunteerism mixed in with it. It would be supported by small business for students. A mentor with actual experience would assist students with ideas, plans and support them through it. Say for example a student wanted to learn the basics to get his startup Surfboard shop going.. or start a Daycare. Open a mobile Taco Stand. They have such great ideas and we should be teaching them the skills they need to accomplish it. And there should be major Tax breaks for kick starting their business! Just like the "Big Boys"...



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:03 PM
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originally posted by: BestinShow
a reply to: onequestion

?,?,?...

3 questions and nothing else...

Well done!

What we need to teach in High school is the concept of Social Capital - as soon as that paradigm is instilled into our youth, the Business side of things can be focused on.

bowlingalone.com...



This is exactly what I'm talking about. The main point being we need to reinvigorate American entrepeneurship or the spirit of in order to take advantage of the Incoming explosion of 3d manufacturing and hemp products and small organic farming to support the community.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:05 PM
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originally posted by: scattergun
This would be fantastic. I do believe it would have to have a great bit of volunteerism mixed in with it. It would be supported by small business for students. A mentor with actual experience would assist students with ideas, plans and support them through it. Say for example a student wanted to learn the basics to get his startup Surfboard shop going.. or start a Daycare. Open a mobile Taco Stand. They have such great ideas and we should be teaching them the skills they need to accomplish it. And there should be major Tax breaks for kick starting their business! Just like the "Big Boys"...


Great idea lets start a school that does this based on a business model that succeeds so tptb want to invest in it and use proceeds donated from successful students to expand.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:07 PM
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Did something happen in the last 35 years? Business courses were offered at all my high schools. As a military kid that was 3 in 4 years.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: intrepid

Something has happened because in that same exact time period we've lost the middle class and create a police state.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:12 PM
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What a student studies should be based on their goals, interests and abilities. That said, my daughter was able to take business math as an 8th grader, and I was delighted. Not entrepreneurship yet, but I'm gently trying to persuade her to take more of the business admin classes. She wants to major in science (biomed engineering) and I keep pointing out that a scientist that understands their funding would be incredible useful.


My son has autism, I will be trying to interest him in the personal econ classes the high school offers. That will back up the real world skills I'm teaching him.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:24 PM
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These courses would be built on what foundation? Large proportions of our students don't test proficient at reading or math. And that's when they graduate.

Fine, give them the dream of entrepreneurship if you like, but they'll be left unable to reach that dream. How many high school graduates could fill out a corporate tax form, a W-4, figure out the procedures for their various licenses, compare the costs and benefits of three corporate credit card offers? Now, what do you suspect the socio-economic and ethnic make-up of the non-proficient are?

It reminds me of:

1.) Buy dirty underwear.
2.) ???????
3.) Profit

I really like your goal, excellent. I just have no clue how it will happen. But I expect you've got that figured out. I may not be good at creative thinking.
edit on 21-10-2014 by charles1952 because: sp



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: charles1952

Ya never know Charles. Different aspects of a certain subject might work for some. Grade 12. 52 in Math. 92 in Physics. THAT makes no sense but it happened. Business administration could show some how to "build" something. Sounds worthy to me.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: charles1952

Won't the motivation from dreaming be the motivation needed to learn math and reading? Isn't that the point?

Your complaining about them not being capable of what their doing now. I'm saying that's not the problem the problem is motivation. Maybe giving them motivation and the idea of work ethic instead of entitlement, it will be the force they need to "achieve". Weather it's a business course or not is just an interchangeable variable dependent on the desired outcome.
edit on 10/21/2014 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: intrepid

I'm the same, grade 9,95% in science programming and comprehension. Everything else, 0. My school was perplexed and refused to fail me for 3 years strait because I was the best programmer in the class and they had no idea what to do with me. I failed math horribly but my ability to script and deal with variables and problem solving with computers was top notch.

Weird right?



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:37 PM
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Business Studies has been a common secondary/high school exam subject for decades here in the UK, my own son took it from age 11/12 to 16. I had assumed that all 'developed' nations taught it (including the US) prior to reading this thread?



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:49 PM
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If you made it a required course I think you would end up with mainly crap teachers in a classroom where 90+% of the students thought it was stupid... Waste of money.

If an elective course, it would come down to the school districts tax base and being able to afford to offer it. If enough students showed an interest.

Where I am from, and very well may be common across the country, we could go to the local community college for 1/2 the day and take classes in a variety of subjects. You had to pick one, electronics for example. I don't recall how many subjects were offered.

That way 5 or 6 kids from my school along with 2 or 3 or 6 from the other schools in the county would fill a classroom with students actually wanting to learn that particular subject.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 03:52 PM
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At what grade level should students learn business administration from a financially and morally bankrupt institution?

None. These people have no business teaching anyone anything about money. The irony is just too much.

They don't even have enough money to pay for their existing programs without driving the country (their children) into massive debt. Why on Earth would anyone submit their kids to such nonsense in the first place?

It's like taking a course in financial derivatives with Bernie Madoff as the professor. Jesus.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 04:27 PM
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I agree, this is a very lofty goal. However I'm interested in it for it's base idea. It's our schools that are messed up, not the students. Now owning a business isn't all math, and it isn't about regulations. I had a business and used quick-books to pay everyone including all payroll liabilities with the State and Fed. I succeeded without being an accountant.. There are tools out here to help. The Schools? Another matter entirely. Our schools are full of Teachers who "Teach their own views", not at all what they were hired on to do. Thats a big problem.

What about a funded Magnate School program to lean a skill set for High School student or a VoTec?



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 04:32 PM
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Well, with intrepid and onequestion agreeing, I'll have to go back and reconsider. We've tried every other incentive we can think of, maybe this will work. It's worth a try.

But there are still many potential problems.

1.) Will the student actually start a business sometime in high school? If so, you can guarantee that many businesses will fail (they always do), and that parents and kids will be suing for giving bad business advice, or advice the teacher is licensed to give, like legal. And I can hear a kid saying, "I wanted to start a torn diaper repair service, but Mr. Johnson told me not to. It would have worked, I'm sure of it."

2.) The business class is not the incentive, the money that comes from a successful business is the incentive. A quarter of start-ups don't last a year. And at the end of three years 44% are gone. Is the incentive to sit through the class that strong? Maybe.

www.statisticbrain.com...

3.) How many kids want to spend 12 hours a day and more at a start-up in order to make money? Especially when there is no guarantee that they will make any money. Will that be considered an extreme example of "acting white?"

But sure, try it in a dozen schools, see what happens.

With respect,
Charles1952



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 04:52 PM
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a reply to: charles1952

If your 1.) is answered with a yes that will force the students to contemplate what kind of business they would want to start possibly helping us figure out if college or experience is the best option for this student, right?

I know this because it forced my ex to think about what kind of restaurant she wanted to run during culinary school. It really made her think.
edit on 10/21/2014 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



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