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Fascinating Study Shows Human Intention Can Help Heal Cancer Patients

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posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 08:31 AM
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www.collective-evolution.com...





As a result of multiple experiments that have taken place over the past few decades, many scientists all over the world have concluded that human consciousness is directly correlated with our physical material world in some way. Although not completely understood, the connection exists. One great example of this is the fact that human intention was found to be directly correlated with the autonomic nervous system in cancer patients.

The autonomic nervous system is a part of the nervous system that regulates involuntary functions in the body, which include the activity of the heart muscle, swallowing, muscles in the intestinal tract and more. It has two parts, one of them being what’s called the sympathetic nervous system, which accelerates the heart rate and the parasympathetic nervous system, which slows down the heart rate and relaxes the sphincter muscles, among other things.


Does this research help prove the benificial aspects of prayer, directed meditation, wishful thinking, on our health.





“Skin conductance level was measured in each member of a couple, both of whom were asked to feel the presence of the other. While the receiving person relaxed in a distant shielded room for 30 minutes, the sending person directed intention toward the receiver during repeated 10 second epochs separated by random interepoch periods. Thirty six couples participated in 38 test sessions. In 22 couples, one in the pairing was a cancer patient. In 12 of those couples, the healthy person was trained to direct intention toward the patient and asked to practice that intention daily for three months prior to the experiment (trained group). In the other 10 couples, the pair was tested before the partner was trained (wait group). Fourteen healthy couples received no training (control group).” (1)


Interesting study....




posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 08:51 AM
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a reply to: olaru12

The journal's mission statement:


EXPLORE: The Journal of Science & Healing addresses the scientific principles behind, and applications of, evidence-based healing practices from a wide variety of sources, including conventional, alternative, and cross-cultural medicine. It is an interdisciplinary journal that explores the healing arts, consciousness, spirituality, eco-environmental issues, and basic science as all these fields relate to health.


Dodgy.

How their peer review works:


Please submit the names and institutional e-mail addresses of several potential referees. For more details, visit our Support site. Note that the editor retains the sole right to decide whether or not the suggested reviewers are used.


Choosing your own refs? Highly unconventional. Very dodgy.

Looking through the journal's previous publications, there's all sorts of woo they publish. These sorts of crappy journals exist so people publishing/defending bad science can say "See? It was published in a peer-reviewed journal, it's not a crock of nonsense". However, this is cargo cult science at its finest. Giving things the superficial look of scientific credibility but without having to be held to the high standards expected of scientific work.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 09:16 AM
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Will to live and attitude are important, as is proper communications between the brain and cells and also cell to cell communication. A major part is environmental factors and not eating things your body cannot process correctly. Food chemistry is very important, the types of food is dependent on your individual genes. I have been investigating my DNA and looking at mutations that are actually correcting some genetic weaknesses and trying to analyze how this happens. Studying my own DNA gives me an advantage as I know what foods I can't tolerate and have done lots of research on the multiple chemistries contained in foods I consume regularly.

Just utilizing mineral and vitamins for nutrition is extremely flawed. Bashing fats and carbs without considering our personal interactions with these is not good. Most times gluten intolerance is not the problem for people, it is wheat chemistry that causes problems. Avoiding gluten means you avoid wheat, problem solved. But the chemistry of Rye, which includes gluten, is acceptable for many who avoid it. This is just one example, chemistry of food as related to genetics is very important. We have to analyze this ourselves, a doctor cannot analyze this in a fifteen minute appointment but may be able to steer us to fix the problem if they have the knowledge. It is easier to correct consumption than to get sick and need treatment and pills.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 10:12 AM
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originally posted by: GetHyped



Looking through the journal's previous publications, there's all sorts of woo they publish. These sorts of crappy journals exist so people publishing/defending bad science can say "See? It was published in a peer-reviewed journal, it's not a crock of nonsense". However, this is cargo cult science at its finest. Giving things the superficial look of scientific credibility but without having to be held to the high standards expected of scientific work.


So does this mean that you don't think prayer, meditation, can influence healing.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 10:21 AM
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a reply to: olaru12

No better than placebo, no.


The Victorian scientist Francis Galton made the first statistical analysis of third-party prayer. He hypothesized, partly as satire, that if prayer was effective, members of the British Royal Family would live longer than average, given that thousands prayed for their well-being every Sunday, and he prayed over randomized plots of land to see if the plants would grow any faster, and found no correlation in either case.[19][20]

The amount of formal research performed on intercessory prayer is quite small, with about $5 million spent worldwide on such research each year.[21] The parameters used within the study designs have varied, for instance, daily or weekly prayers, whether to provide patient photographs, with full or partial names, measuring levels of belief in prayer, and whether patients underwent surgery.

The third party studies have all been performed using Christian prayers, and reported either null results, correlated results, or contradictory results in which beneficiaries of prayer had worsened health outcomes. For instance, a meta-analysis of several studies related to distant intercessory healing published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 2000 looked at 2774 patients in 23 studies, and found that 13 showed statistically significant positive results, 9 showed no effect, and 1 showed a negative result.[22]

A 2003 levels of evidence review found evidence for the hypothesis that "Being prayed for improves physical recovery from acute illness".[23] It concluded that although "a number of studies" have tested this hypothesis, "only three have sufficient rigor for review here" (Byrd 1988, Harris et al. 1999, and Sicher et al. 1998). In all three, "the strongest findings were for the variables that were evaluated most subjectively, raising concerns about the possible inadvertent unmasking of the outcomes assessors. Other meta-studies of the broader literature have been performed showing evidence only for no effect or a potentially small effect. For instance, a 2006 meta analysis on 14 studies concluded that there is "no discernable effect" while a 2007 systemic review of intercessory prayer reported inconclusive results, noting that 7 of 17 studies had "small, but significant, effect sizes" but the review noted that the three most methodologically rigorous studies failed to produce significant findings.[24][25]


en.wikipedia.org...

If praying or meditating makes someone feel better about themselves then great, I'm sure it can help take the edge of the emotional trauma of being ill. But to say that it has efficacy in healing disease etc. is unfortunately not supported in evidence.



posted on Oct, 21 2014 @ 10:43 AM
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originally posted by: olaru12

originally posted by: GetHyped



Looking through the journal's previous publications, there's all sorts of woo they publish. These sorts of crappy journals exist so people publishing/defending bad science can say "See? It was published in a peer-reviewed journal, it's not a crock of nonsense". However, this is cargo cult science at its finest. Giving things the superficial look of scientific credibility but without having to be held to the high standards expected of scientific work.


So does this mean that you don't think prayer, meditation, can influence healing.

I actually have a peer reviewed study in the same "general study area" thought/meditation:

The University of Wisconsin-Madison has provided the first evidence of specific molecular changes in the body following a period of mindfulness meditation.

Researchers from Spain, France, and Wisconsin have reported that the effects of a single day of intensive mindfulness meditation can change our genes. The study, published in Psychoneuroendocrinology, showed that after eight hours of mindfulness practice, meditators showed a range of genetic expression changes, including altered levels of gene-regulating machinery and reduced levels of pro-inflammatory genes, which means that people could recover from stress and its physical ramifications much faster than previously thought possible.

Sourcewww.infowars.com...



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