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What Would Happen if the Poles Flipped?

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posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 11:34 AM
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Would you not go arse over tit in slow motion like in the films?

That was an attempt at humour by the way...

Phage your thoughts?

Kindest respects

Rodinus




posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 11:59 AM
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originally posted by: SpeakerofTruth
a reply to: lostbook

Basically what you are seeing now. Erratic weather patterns. Odd occurrences in the sky. Massive oceanic die offs, et cetera.
It's important to understand that when talking about a "pole shift," it doesn't mean a literal flipping of the planet. It means a shifting of the electromagnetic field around the planet.


At one point, I considered if the whole planet would flip over. That would mean death for all humans on Earth. Then again, a complete Radiation bath wouldn't bode well either.
edit on 20-10-2014 by lostbook because: word add



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: ISeekTruth101

Sorry, but wrong, wrong and wrong. It is shifting as we speak. If you don't believe that, ask anyone in aviation. They have to recalibrate every year. The poles shift 40 miles every year.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 12:05 PM
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originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
A pole shift doesn't involve any land movements. It's purely magnetic . a reply to: AK907ICECOLD



Some dirt and rocks have metals/ minerals, some of which are magnetic. Wouldn't the land(s) be disrupted in some way(s)?



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 12:05 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Yeah, but it's not only improbable, it's almost physically impossible.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 02:10 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

How many Poles can actually flip?



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 02:31 PM
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originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
A pole shift doesn't involve any land movements. It's purely magnetic . a reply to: AK907ICECOLD



Some dirt and rocks have metals/ minerals, some of which are magnetic. Wouldn't the land(s) be disrupted in some way(s)?


The Earth's magnetic field is weaker than a magnet on a fridge door.

Field strength is not enough to move heavy minerals like Iron around.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 05:08 PM
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The poles has been flipped......



....with my globe.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: SpeakerofTruth

Questions: Does the core flip polarity, physically rotate to reverse polarity? If so, what is speculated to trigger such?

If the core flips, surely lava swells would react, especially in hot spots. Radiation would warm the oceans, so what effect would that have on plate tectonics under the oceans? Is it possible that polar reversals contribute to continental drifting?

I am curious if you have any thoughts, or anyone else as well.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 07:28 PM
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originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
A pole shift doesn't involve any land movements. It's purely magnetic . a reply to: AK907ICECOLD



Some dirt and rocks have metals/ minerals, some of which are magnetic. Wouldn't the land(s) be disrupted in some way(s)?


Nope. The Earth's magnetic field is very weak.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 07:33 PM
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originally posted by: Boscov
a reply to: SpeakerofTruth

Questions: Does the core flip polarity, physically rotate to reverse polarity?


No.

The mechanism that creates the magnetic field is very sensitive to small changes in internal convection states.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 08:57 PM
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Like people have said, it's happened many times before.
Pole flipping



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 08:56 AM
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No it won't. The reversal is in polarity not rotation. If the world stopped rotating or even just slowed down a little perpetual motion would fling us all off into space. reply to: ISeekTruth101




posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 08:59 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
Where was our world the last time it happened if not here?a reply to: intrptr


See my other reply.

I "flipped" a magnet over one time, it was am a zing… not a thing happened.



I know what you meant. I just thought the phrase was funny. Sorry if I offended you really.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 09:05 AM
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There are patterns under the ocean showing exactly that. Minerals that are magnetic or attracted to magnetics show a stripped pattern
I meant not large land mass movements like crashing continents or off the chart quakes.

www.google.com...

a reply to: lostbook


edit on AM0000003100000010104407312014-10-27T09:07:10-05:00 by AutumnWitch657 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 09:12 AM
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originally posted by: Bedlam

originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
A pole shift doesn't involve any land movements. It's purely magnetic . a reply to: AK907ICECOLD



Some dirt and rocks have metals/ minerals, some of which are magnetic. Wouldn't the land(s) be disrupted in some way(s)?


Nope. The Earth's magnetic field is very weak.
actually the patterns that are created in underwater minerals is what proof we have that these pole shifts have occurred in the past so the poles certainly have some effect on the metallic minerals.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 09:21 AM
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a reply to: AutumnWitch657


I know what you meant. I just thought the phrase was funny.

Me too. Its all good.



posted on Oct, 27 2014 @ 10:05 AM
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originally posted by: AutumnWitch657
actually the patterns that are created in underwater minerals is what proof we have that these pole shifts have occurred in the past so the poles certainly have some effect on the metallic minerals.


It's one thing to leave a remanent magnetic field in a material cooled below its Curie point in the field du jour.

It's another to say that the Earth will tear itself to bits due to the powerful forces caused by the magnetic poles reversing, because, as I said, they're not very powerful.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 02:19 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Agreed. Actually it doesn't really matter where the poles are---it's more important to us that there are some and the field is strong to ameliorate the radiation and other effects of solar wind.

Don't matter if they flip---but the transition if there's a lower field strength could be undesirable.



posted on Oct, 28 2014 @ 03:21 AM
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originally posted by: mbkennel
a reply to: Bedlam
Don't matter if they flip---but the transition if there's a lower field strength could be undesirable.


I always fancied this look -




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