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Learning a second language - what does new technology offer?

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posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 11:11 PM
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I am considering learning a new language.
I used to know a little Hongul but I've long since forgotten it.
I learned to read arabic script and knew some basic arabic words but no longer have need of it.
I am now in a situation where I would like to learn Russian as I may use it in the future.
I have about a year to begin learning but I cannot take the time for classes and I learned all of my previous languages from the necessity of immersion in the culture.

So, my questions for ATS are as follows:

1. What is the best conventional method available to learn a new language?

2. Are there any new systems for learning a language that work outside of a classroom?

3. Are there any memory enhancements available such as subliminal, paraliminal or sleep learning that work to learn languages?

4. Does anyone have any experience with learning enhancement through noorotropics or memory enhancing supplements?

I think the eclectic bunch we have here at ATS might have some effective experience in these areas.

Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated.
edit on 19-10-2014 by badgerprints because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 11:43 PM
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I dated a Chinese exchange student for a while. She didn't speak English very well and I knew nothing of speaking Mandarin. We had a lot of fun hanging out and teaching each the others language.
I was surprised at how well we could communicate non verbally.
She taught me some phrases that made her laugh her ass off when I spoke them without my ever knowing what I was saying.
It was pretty obvious I was being ribbed but I didn't mind.
After a few months her English improved quite a bit.
My Mandarin is still pretty rusty. I know how to ask where the bathroom is and tell a girl she is very pretty if I ever go to China.
Ni hen piaoliang.



posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 11:47 PM
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a reply to: skunkape23

My Arabic and Hongul were learned in the culture.
I need to learn Russian on my own.
Not sure what would work best.
Already taught myself cyrillic so I can read Russian but I don't know what the words mean.
That's the hardest part for me, learning and memorizing enough words to actually converse.
My memory isn't so good any more.



posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 11:52 PM
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I am also in the process of learning Russian and I have found that it's easiest to start from scratch. Begin by learning the alphabet and the sounds they make, plus their cursive form so you can write it. Watch children shows and youtube videos of phrases and everyday words.


As of right now, I'm using a program that I bought from Barnes and Noble called, Living Language: Russian. It's very useful and allows you to listen from a cd and write in a books that range from beginner to advanced.

BTW Russian sounds really cool, I can't wait to use it in the coming years!





posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 11:53 PM
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a reply to: badgerprints

I heard that some have used the Rosetta Stone DVD and they say it was fairly easy to do.



posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 11:58 PM
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Don't know if you have a smart phone or an iPad or something similar, but recently I downloaded a program called Babbel, it's free to download but once you get past the basics they charge, no idea what they charge, but that may be worth a try.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 12:04 AM
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Living language russian
rosetta stone
babbel

I wanted to try rosetta stone but don't have the extra cash at the moment.
I'll check into babbel and living language.

Anybody ever use sleep learning or memory supplements?



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 12:22 AM
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I stumbled across this site a while back haven't put the time to actually use it but when I looked around a bit it seems pretty good.

ilanguages.org...



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 06:06 AM
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Download and practice the "Pimsleur method." And go to youtube and watch/listen to stuff in Russian.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 06:16 AM
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Believe it or not you tube can get you started: This was the first thing I came across but usually there are several people who are posting on how to learn a particular language. Suggest head phones.


youtu.be...



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 08:06 AM
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originally posted by: Dimithae
a reply to: badgerprints

I heard that some have used the Rosetta Stone DVD and they say it was fairly easy to do.


Rosetta is an excellent way to learn a language, second best to immersing oneself into the culture desired. I've had my Rosetta CDs for about ten years and frequently fire them up to do a little of studying of Spanish.

Rosetta is not a cheap program, probably the most expensive out there for language learning. But it is the next best thing to being there. I'm a slow learner and with Rosetta, I can repeat, repeat and repeat the words and sentences until I get them correct. You can study at you own pace and time and Rosetta never gets impatient with you.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 11:55 AM
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a reply to: badgerprints

Hi, badgerprints. I am also learning Russian, and I have a method of memorizing vocabulary that may help you.

I like to make pictures to remember words and phrases like Доброе утро.

You have to relate things. For "good morning" I thought of breakfast, which made me think of breakfast sausage, which made me think of Jimmy Dean. So, naturally, the Russian Jimmий Дийн comic followed.

Sometimes you can memorize words from the way they sound. For спасибо (thanks) it sounded like your saying "spicy bowl" which is humorous enough to help remember the word.

A good goal:

Memorize the 500 most common Russian words. Don't worry about grammar or syntax, find someone to talk to that knows Russian and you will be surprised at how fast you learn. The key is speaking from the beginning. A native speaker will correct your mistakes, and you should encourage them to do so. You're going to make mistakes, just laugh them off and continue on.

Once you are speaking and thinking in Russian, then start learning russian grammar rules, it will reinforce your language learning and boost your fluency.

If you can't find a native speaker (Couch surf), you could hire a private tutor and meet them once or twice a week for one hour at a time.

There are some pretty inexpensive tutors.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 12:00 PM
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a reply to: badgerprints

I once stumbled upon this site. It is fantastic.

Link.

It probably has threads on every possible method for learning new languages.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 12:21 PM
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That Mykel Hawke dude (survival shows) has a book on how to learn different languages fast...
He speaks 7 languages or so...



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 12:28 PM
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posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 01:23 PM
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a reply to: LewsTherinThelamon


For спасибо (thanks) it sounded like your saying "spicy bowl"


More like "spass-ee-ba".

The 'o' in Russian is usually rendered like a full-blooded 'a' sound, as heard in northern English accents and German 'kann'.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 02:38 PM
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originally posted by: CJCrawley
a reply to: LewsTherinThelamon


For спасибо (thanks) it sounded like your saying "spicy bowl"


More like "spass-ee-ba".

The 'o' in Russian is usually rendered like a full-blooded 'a' sound, as heard in northern English accents and German 'kann'.


I know, the "spicy bowl" was just the closest sound that I could think of to relate it to.

Maybe "saucy ball" would better, lol.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 02:47 PM
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Well, I learned English watching subtitled movies and TV shows, that's the only non-school way of learning a language that I know.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 02:52 PM
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originally posted by: ArMaP
Well, I learned English watching subtitled movies and TV shows, that's the only non-school way of learning a language that I know.


Really?

What did you do to piece together what you were seeing and hearing?



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 03:09 PM
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originally posted by: LewsTherinThelamon
Really?

Really. The only language I learned at school, besides my own language (Portuguese) was French.


What did you do to piece together what you were seeing and hearing?

Sorry, I don't understand what you mean.

(as you see the method is not perfect
)



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