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Physicists Create Reversable Laser Tractor Beam

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posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 10:25 PM
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This is way cool, ATS. Scientists have created a Tractor Beam which can push or pull objects up to 20cm, a distance which is 100 times farther than the previous record according to the article.



The groundbreaking tractor beam, made of a hollow laser beam (a laser bright around the edges and hollow in the centre), was able to move particles 0.2 mm in diameter distances up to 20 cm (7.87 in) -- around 100 times farther than has been achieved in previous experiments.

"Demonstration of a large scale laser beam like this is a kind of holy grail for laser physicists," said Professor Wieslaw Krolikowski from the Research School of Physics and Engineering at The Australian National University.

Previous experiments, such as those conducted by the University of St Andrews, relied upon the motion of photons to propel particles on a microscopic level. The ANU's experiment, however, used the laser differently: rather than photon momentum, the team used heat.


The implications are major for this type of technology. This will really come in handy for the Space junk issue. Wow! I'd say the future is here. What says ATS?

www.cnet.com...=YHF65cbda0




posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 10:36 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

The implications are major for this type of technology. This will really come in handy for the Space junk issue.
Not really. It won't work in space.



This create hotspots; when air particles collide with these hotspots, they heat up and shoot away from the particle; in turn, the particle then recoils in the opposite direction.

www.cnet.com...



posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 10:53 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: lostbook

The implications are major for this type of technology. This will really come in handy for the Space junk issue.
Not really. It won't work in space.



That sucks.....Oh well, it can still have huge implications here on Earth. I can see new methods/uses being developed in the Construction industry with this technology.

What do you think about using this technology as a primitive shield? Used in repel mode you could repel bullets, correct?
edit on 19-10-2014 by lostbook because: text change



posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 10:57 PM
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a reply to: lostbook


What do you think about using this technology as a primitive shield? Used in repel mode you could repel bullets, correct?
No. Think about the explanation of how it works. How many air molecules bouncing off of a bullet will it take to repel it. I think Kevlar will do a better job.

It will only work on very small, light objects. You would have to heat those construction materials up a whole lot to get this to work on them. It's neat and all, might have some practical applications, but only on a small scale.



posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 11:02 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: lostbook


What do you think about using this technology as a primitive shield? Used in repel mode you could repel bullets, correct?
No. Think about the explanation of how it works. How many air molecules bouncing off of a bullet will it take to repel it. I think Kevlar will do a better job.

It will only work on very small, light objects. You would have to heat those construction materials up a whole lot to get this to work on them. It's neat and all, might have some practical applications, but only on a small scale.


I see.......I'll wait for this tech to advance some more. Maybe the next generation will do that. Thanks, Phage..



posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 11:02 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: lostbook


What do you think about using this technology as a primitive shield? Used in repel mode you could repel bullets, correct?
No. Think about the explanation of how it works. How many air molecules bouncing off of a bullet will it take to repel it. I think Kevlar will do a better job.

It will only work on very small, light objects. You would have to heat those construction materials up a whole lot to get this to work on them. It's neat and all, might have some practical applications, but only on a small scale.


ok how about Nano atom assembly... like building stuff on a sub atomic level .. can it do that?



posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 11:04 PM
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a reply to: okamitengu

Nope. Because the effect occurs at the molecular level.
It's an action/reaction effect. Sort of like a tiny rocket, but not quite.



posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 11:22 PM
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lol, thanks so much for responding!
it essentially not applicable to any useful work yet then?

seems like they need to make a use for it!



posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 11:32 PM
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They just need to scale it up by a factor of 1 billion - from 0.2 mm to 2 meters in three dimensions.

Maybe if they can combine 100,000 10 KiloWatt industrial lasers together, they might be able to get a human sized version to work. That is if the person doesn't vaporize first...



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 01:46 AM
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a reply to: stormcell

One would not ordinarily want to point powerful lasers at human tissue. Also, one would not normally wish to use any form of tractor beam on a human being.

They need to come up with a method for extra atmospheric tractor effect creation. I think the best way to achieve that would be to insist that all individuals and research groups currently looking into it, were re-tasked to think about tractor tech for use outside the atmosphere, to develop a test platform for the ISS.
edit on 20-10-2014 by TrueBrit because: Added detail.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 08:23 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: okamitengu

Nope. Because the effect occurs at the molecular level.
It's an action/reaction effect. Sort of like a tiny rocket, but not quite.


What about if you had enough to entirely enclose an object at the molecular level......almost like a web?



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 08:29 AM
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Now that I think more about this technology in terms of construction, I think about ancient cultures and how they were able to build such massive structures without any of our modern tech. Maybe they had something like this which allowed them to "push" or "pull" massive objects into place. Maybe they also used lasers for the intricate carvings that we see.



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 09:09 AM
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originally posted by: lostbook
Now that I think more about this technology in terms of construction, I think about ancient cultures and how they were able to build such massive structures without any of our modern tech. Maybe they had something like this which allowed them to "push" or "pull" massive objects into place. Maybe they also used lasers for the intricate carvings that we see.


Maybe. But they did have human power, which could have been enough to move large stones into place -- although they probably would also need leverage systems such as pulleys and levers (they may have had pulley-like systems prior to the time history said pulleys were developed).

Intricate stone carvings can be done today with just hand tools, so I don't think ancient people would necessarily need lasers to do the same kind of carvings.


edit on 10/20/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 09:37 AM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: lostbook
Now that I think more about this technology in terms of construction, I think about ancient cultures and how they were able to build such massive structures without any of our modern tech. Maybe they had something like this which allowed them to "push" or "pull" massive objects into place. Maybe they also used lasers for the intricate carvings that we see.


Maybe. But they did have human power, which could have been enough to move large stones into place -- although they probably would also need leverage systems such as pulleys and levers (they may have had pulley-like systems prior to the time history said pulleys were developed).

Intricate stone carvings can be done today with just hand tools, so I don't think ancient people would necessarily need lasers to do the same kind of carvings.



Yes, however some of the lines are cut with such precision, a laser seems to be the only thing that could have been used. Puma Punku comes to mind.




What Makes The Ruins Unique?

It is highly unlikely that any of the stones in Puma Punku were cut using ancient stone cutting techniques, at least not those that we are aware of.

The stones in Puma Punku are made up of granite, and diorite, and the only stone that is harder that those two, is the diamond. If the people who built this place cut these stones using stone cutting techniques, then they would had to have used diamond tools.

If they didn't use diamonds to cut these stones, then what did they use?

Not only were these stones really hard to cut, but they are also extremely heavy. One of these stone ruins weighs in at about 800 tons! These are big stones, and they are really heavy. The nearest quarry is at least 10 miles away from the site of the ruins. How in the world did these people move these blocks that weighed many tons, and how were they able to form a structure with them?

With the technology that we currently have today, it would be extremely difficult to recreate the site of these ruins, if possible at all. If we can't do it, then how did these ancient people accomplish this task? This could have taken place anywhere from 500 b.c. all the way back to the Ice Age


But that's another thread:
daveearley.hubpages.com...

Just wanted to use the example to support this thread.



posted on Oct, 25 2014 @ 03:25 AM
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Ive seen this article and something came to my mind . This could be a great discovery of building this device that can contract viruses on airports . I mean why not build a scanner that identifies the virus and contract it out of the air with this tractor beam that IMHO could warn us if a dangerous virus contaminate airports and contract it right out of the air and quarantine the virus for further examination. I see airports and harbors as the lymphatic spreaders of our societies .



posted on Oct, 25 2014 @ 04:00 AM
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a reply to: lostbook

What you seem to be unable to grasp, is that this effect operates on a particle level, not on an object level. No mesh, web, net or other similar construction of beams, would allow an entire person, or object to be moved as a whole, because only individual particles, small enough to fit inside the "hollow" part of the beam can be moved using this technique. Furthermore, because the effect relies on heating certain areas of the particle to produce motion through a thermally reactive medium, its use on organic material of any kind, let alone entire organisms is not a viable option.

What I am saying, is that to produce an effect which is capable of moving organisms around, a field or beam would have to operate on the entire object as a whole, and use methods which involve no alteration of the chemical, thermal, or electromagnetic status of the target object.

Now as for TRANSPORTER style technology, the closest we have is quantum tunneling, which yet once more, is an effect which has a very limited scale, in terms of the size of objects which can be moved by the process, and as of right now, the largest thing that has been put through the process is a damned electron. Note worthy, but not even a baby step toward ANYTHING like the sort of utility that you are describing.







 
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