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Alexander of Macedon, Conspirator?

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posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 09:27 AM
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Could Alexander have arranged to have his father assassinated? Could he have networked with the generals of his enemies to acquire their surrender before the time of battle to usurp those kings before he ever drew a single drop of blood? Alexander was a diplomat in the house of his father. He would have known most of those people on a first name basis long before his military campaigns. Would it be sensible for him to oust families that he grew up with? While our mainstream history records depict him as a military genius who conquered his foes and a diplomatic genius who worked with the leaders of the territories after the fact to restore peace, could a conspiracy explain how he was so consistently successful in each of his military engagements?

The Astronomical Diaries which is one of the only primary sources available for his military excursion into Persia suggests that the generals abandoned their king on the battle field at the first sight of Alexander's army. This is not the way western history records these events. For those astrology records to be an accurate predictive tool, the events that occurred under certain signs in the sky must be recorded accurately. These were not for public dissemination, which negates the motivation to alter the record for purposes of propaganda. They might still have been biased, but why would they claim the armies abandoned their king if that did not, to some degree, occur?

Site about Astronomical Diaries

According to our historians, Alexander defeated Darius with a force roughly a tenth the size of Darius's and Darius fled. Is that even sensible? This was not Darius I, the military genius, but Darius III. He is recorded in history as being an ineffective and inexperienced leader who had little success managing his territories prior to Alexander's invasion. Could Alexander's conquest of Persia have been a humanitarian mission? Could the generals of Persia have abandoned their king on the fields of battle because even they no longer wanted to follow his rule? The only extant primary source seems to imply this possibility.




posted on Oct, 19 2014 @ 02:31 PM
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a reply to: Nechash

This is a very interesting post. Any historical account of a great leader is revised for modern purposes. This is true across the board. Since Alexander built the greatest Western empire in history I'm sure he's been whitewashed heavily in the many centuries since then.



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