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After California decriminalized marijuana, teen arrest, overdose and dropout rates fell

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posted on Oct, 16 2014 @ 10:29 PM
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Well go figure. I think there is a nature balance equation that reductionist want to ignore. We'll see the trend continue as we stop trying to fight natural forces and nature itself. The trend being balance being restored to the community.



A new report from the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice adds to the growing body of evidence that legalizing or decriminalizing marijuana does not lead to any number of doomsday scenarios envisioned by legalization opponents. Looking specifically at California, where full marijuana decriminalization went into effect on Jan. 1, 2011, the report finds that "marijuana decriminalization in California has not resulted in harmful consequences for teenagers, such as increased crime, drug overdose, driving under the influence, or school dropout. In fact, California teenagers showed improvements in all risk areas after reform."


Oh because we aren't forcing millions of people into a dark underworld? Go figure?

Wash ington Post




posted on Oct, 16 2014 @ 10:34 PM
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I, really tired so what I said might not make sense.



posted on Oct, 16 2014 @ 10:39 PM
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a reply to: onequestion




Oh because we aren't forcing millions of people into a dark underworld? Go figure?


Every new drug I ever tried I got from some shady dealer.

Why can't they understand that.

If Pot is a "Gateway Drug" somebody better tell Willie Nelson...He just turned 80.



posted on Oct, 16 2014 @ 10:53 PM
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Read this study earlier and thought, well look at that! Part of the intent of this failed drug war. After all they need to fill jails to meet their quotas, for profit incarnations and basically keep poverty in tow and make even more. If the POTUS really wants change such as with the new DOJ candidate. Sadly, probably another case where I'm just getting my hopes up.
edit on 16-10-2014 by dreamingawake because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 16 2014 @ 10:55 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

SSSSSSHHHHHHHHHHSSSHHHH!!!

Spreading these facts will destroy the whole marijuana use leads to crime and delinquency argument!

Do you have any idea what you've just done!



posted on Oct, 16 2014 @ 11:12 PM
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I have to share what I think is one of the best articles ever published about legalizing marijuana. This appeared in a Dayton, Ohio paper in April 2014



This could be why they had such a hard time finding a writer for the piece



Ohio voters are strongly in favor of medical marijuana, with a recent Quinnipiac poll showing that 87 percent of state voters support using the drug for medicinal purposes.

Nationally, a recent Gallup poll showed that, for the first time, a clear majority of Americans want to see marijuana legalized. Americans also want to see an end to the long-running war on drugs. A recent survey from Pew found that 67 percent of Americans say the government should provide treatment for people who use illegal drugs, while only 26 percent said the government should be prosecuting drug users.


Link to article about the article



posted on Oct, 16 2014 @ 11:42 PM
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a reply to: whyamIhere

The reason for that is because they criminalized a medicine that's been used for thousands of years. If it wasn't in the hands of a giant organization trafficking it like deadly weapons then shady dealers wouldn't exist in great numbers (they'd exist selling cheaper amounts of legal goods).

It wasn't a drug until TPTB realized it's a useful tool for positive change, physical and mental, personal and worldwide.



posted on Oct, 16 2014 @ 11:51 PM
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a reply to: onequestion

This study was from 2010-2012 do they have anything updated to 2014?



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 12:06 AM
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a reply to: thesaneone

You'd think if there was any evidence to the contrary, the anti-legalisation crowd would have leapt on it.

In fact, the best they can do is repeat the same, tired, nonsense arguments that "it can lead to mental illness", like the recent "study" done in the UK - completely ignoring all the nasty side affects that alcohol can cause, as well as the social problems in a country that is gripped with an alcohol abuse problem.

I'm not quite sure where ATS T&C's stand on Weed these days, but I'll err on the side of caution - however, I only drink a few times a year because, to be frank, I don't enjoy it, it gives me headaches and I can do some really stupid crap when drunk, so I leave it to the odd birthday, work night out or Christmas.

I can't say I've ever had any problems doing something else, I am a fully functioning member of society, with children who are doing well in school and I pay my taxes - how many who use alcohol every day can say the same?



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 12:07 AM
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a reply to: stumason

When it's completely legal it'll become the new alcohol. Promoted as a dulling, dreamy substance to block the outside world. Total soma. It won't be promoted as a medicine with thousands of years of recorded use.



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 12:09 AM
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Did California decriminalize marijuana across the board or was only for medical? If it's just medical then how many teens that age get approval for MMJ card?



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 12:13 AM
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a reply to: Yeahkeepwatchingme

Personally, I couldn't care less how it is "promoted" - I just don't want to be stigmatised or persecuted over my choice and especially not by people who think nothing of downing 10 pints of beer on a night out, thinking they are somehow better or that alcohol "isn't a drug".



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 12:15 AM
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a reply to: stumason

Neither do I. I'm tired of being told what I can do with my body by people who don't follow the laws they enact. Tired of some citizens enjoying legality while most are considered criminals. Absolutely fed up with the drug war, big pharma and everybody else thinking they know what's best for other people.

Alcohol kills, weed enlightens. They don't want people enlightened, they'll choose the strains that make you the dullest, numbest, slowest-thinking people in the world.



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 12:18 AM
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a reply to: Yeahkeepwatchingme

That's not how it has happened in countries/states that have legalised or de-criminalised though. I thought I had tried some pretty good stuff in the UK before I went to Amsterdam....

I can understand your pessimism, but I think it is a little unfounded. As for the medical benefits, there are reams of scientific studies into this and most have been reasonably well reported, so I don't think it is likely to be swept under the rug as you think it will.



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 12:19 AM
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a reply to: onequestion

Tequila is legal.

I don't touch the stuff.

If they legalize pot, I won't touch the stuff.

I have my doubts, but in the face of mounting evidence, this may be a case where I'm just an old fart.

Go ahead, legalize it.

Really.

Less prison population.

I bow down to overwhelming evidence.



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 12:24 AM
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a reply to: Yeahkeepwatchingme




They don't want people enlightened, they'll choose the strains that make you the dullest, numbest, slowest-thinking people in the world.


Not sure about that, I live out in Arizona and I'm outside of the 25 mile radius of a dispensary and I am allowed by the state to cultivate plants so I have full control of what strains i want to grow for my needs.



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 12:28 AM
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a reply to: onequestion


'[...]In fact, California teenagers showed improvements in all risk areas after reform.'


Before we all start dancing, doesn't it seem crazy that teenagers 'improve in risk areas' supposedly thanks to smoking marijuana? Is the world so screwed up that it takes a smoke to graduate school? Why would getting high reduce the risk of suicide?

It's good the article mentions causality as it isn't clear that decriminalising causes these improvements. It's good that any region can cheer about its improvements, but, man, it's not good if teenagers have to get high in this life to avoid suicide, ODing or criminal arrest.



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 12:34 AM
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a reply to: beezzer

Quite - each to their own. My point being, one being legal despite the obvious social and health problems it causes and the other, which actually has less health implications and certainly less social implications (when was the last time you heard of someone getting into a fight after having a smoke?)

The UK's own Parliamentary committee on Drug's, for example, placed all known drugs into a list according to their physical and social harm - Alcohol was placed second while Cannabis was placed in around 14th place. They still will not even contemplate a rational debate on decriminalisation though...
edit on 17/10/14 by stumason because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 12:43 AM
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a reply to: stumason

It won't be swept under the rug but they'll try to ignore the medicinal benefits while promoting it as a safe alternative to alcohol (which it is). Problem is more people will look at it as a party favor than a medication.



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 12:48 AM
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a reply to: Yeahkeepwatchingme

That's not a problem because who cares?



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