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Hypothetical Testing: Awareness, or natural response?

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posted on Oct, 16 2014 @ 04:49 PM
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You have been informed that you will be tested by an anonymous superior. You don't know when, you don't know how, but you know that there is a specific agenda you must carry out in order to pass. It would be very preferable if you passed, and you want to do so, but your superior also wants you to be completely honest. You receive training for this agenda. You are now faced with a question:
Is it better to be aware that you will be tested or should you forget that you will be tested and attempt to provide natural responses to the testing?

Awareness of the testing plus the training you received will provide you with the answers you think will best pass the test, but at the same time you may pollute your answers because that may not be how you would naturally respond. In other words, if this test is based on the truest answers you can give, would your answers not truly reflect how you feel?

Adversely, if you are no longer aware that you are being tested, and provide answers based on how you think they should be answered plus how past training affected you, would that not provide the least biased results? If the test is forgotten though, there is a chance you will fail.

Which is the more correct path to take? Or is there perhaps a combination of both?




posted on Oct, 16 2014 @ 05:06 PM
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a reply to: Septimus

It is impossible to observe a thing without changing it in some way. Whatever you do, you are going to interfere with the subject's behavior. I'm not a sociologist, but I'm sure they have experimental controls and research designs that optimize accuracy much the way that epidemiologists do. I think classically psychologists preferred blind studies as more accurate, but these were determined to be too unethical.



posted on Oct, 16 2014 @ 05:37 PM
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a reply to: Septimus

I have found that it is all a test and the correct answer is to just be yourself and when faced with a serious problem it is wise to focus on it for a length of time in order to let all information to form itself in your brain. It is in this manner that the false pretenses fail because when you take the long view they tend to fade away and you are left with a glimpse of the truth. I say in the begining and end you can find truth and the closer your thoughts expand then the closer you become to the truth.



posted on Oct, 16 2014 @ 08:02 PM
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I would do both and compare the answers.



posted on Oct, 17 2014 @ 03:12 PM
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At the moment, I am leaning towards the awareness approach. It always comes down to whether you wish to be as honest as possible, or whether you want to have a greater chance of passing the test. The way I see it, passing the test itself can be seen as honesty, if that is in fact your true intention. In keeping with this intention, passing the test should be your goal no matter what happens as there are only two possibilities when faced with the test, passing or failing.



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