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Nurse 'killed 38 patients she found annoying'

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posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:23 PM
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Looking at that picture I'm surprised she didn't commit suicide.


Daniela Poggiali, a 42-year-old resident of the Italian town of Lugo, was taken into custody over the weekend and booked for the alleged slaying of 78-year-old patient Rosa Calderoni, who died from an injection of potassium.
Calderoni had been admitted to the hospital with a routine illness before she died unexpectedly.
Tests showed she died with a high amount of potassium, which can provoke cardiac arrest, in her bloodstream, according to the Central European News.


This sort of thing is rather frightening. Here you have someone entrusted with others lives and well being and she kills them for being annoying. Even worse (I guess) if the family members were.

Anyone know how she could get away with this for so long?

Anyone aware of any procedures in place to look for this kind of thing?

Do medical workers have to undergo any sort of psych test?


Another one of Poggiali’s colleagues said the accused nurse was once reported for giving powerful laxatives to patients at the end of her shift to make work tougher for nurses working after her.


How does one keep their job after something like that? Or license?


One of Poggiali’s fellow nurses described her as a "cold person but always eager to work",


So creepy.

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posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:28 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

No, this sort of thing is REALLY frightening.
But, in the hospital, I got the impression anything I asked my night nurse for was annoying.
Good post.
We should know.
tetra



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:39 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

So scary! She used potassium, yikes! If people have access to medications that could kill patients, an annual psychological evaluation might not be a bad idea.

Not only is this story scary, it's incredibly sad. She wasn't just killing patients she found annoying, she was also killing patients whose family she found annoying. I hope none of the family members harbor any guilt about their family member being murdered.

She'll fit right in to prison, she's already got what I like to call "prison eyebrows." I hope she gets a "warm" welcome from the other inmates.

Lock this psycho up for life!



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:42 PM
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a reply to: Domo1

Ew.

There's a special circle of hell reserved for people like that.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:45 PM
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Not the first time this has happened. It's actually more common than one might suppose.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:45 PM
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I am still trying to put together that face with what she's done. Great friggin post. Really.

The most normal seeming people can do the most incredibly evil things. I can never get my mind around that.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:48 PM
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Really messed up. Reminds me of the super mormon town that had one local physician who preyed on all the girls in town. No one was willing to bat an eyelash for years because he was above suspicion. I wonder how long it took for people to realize it was her.

This is the reason no one should be above suspicion and no one should have the absolute power. There are people like this littered throughout the professional world, the political world, the military industrial complex. Think about that. And how scary the idea of that is...



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: boncho
Oh is that rare? That happened in my hometown.
lol
tetra
just sayin'….the man preying on the girls in the town, and no one said anything. He took their pictures. Made them look like debutante material, so no one seemed to mind….



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:52 PM
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You think that's bad?
Look at the death rate for people shortly after they go onto hospice care.
Killing is big business and there are large numbers of doctors and caregivers who make a living doing what that psycho did.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:54 PM
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a reply to: SpeakerofTruth

Which is highly disturbing. Even more disturbing is thinking about all the ones that haven't been caught.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:14 PM
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Yes, another who realizes that when the insurance runs low, so does the health care.

My grandmother had a stroke and was sent to live in one of those places where they would supposedly care for her.

Everything she ever had was sold to pay those bills, then she died. I tried to tell my father and everyone else that I would take care of her at her home but they would have nothing of it.

I was married to a nurse for five years and have medical training myself. My ex told me that what is done is opposite of what is needed for many patients in retirement homes when the insurance runs out or the money gets short.

I never participated in the field I trained for because I saw what the medical industry was becoming when I was in college and wanted to have nothing to do with such criminal enterprises. I even disregard what doctor's tell me I should do regarding most health issues because it seems that they are always trying to put me on some medication for things that really only need to be treated with diet and exercise.

Doctors and medical practitioners cannot be trusted, anyone who has you sign a disclaimer cannot be trusted, anyone who thinks they need tort reform to relieve them of any liability for doing damage to one is not to be trusted, the world is becoming a place where you cannot trust anyone at all not to exploit your trust or feed one into a scheme to exploit others.

I don't belong here.

That was a way longer a reply than I started out writing.
a reply to: badgerprints



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:16 PM
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originally posted by: Domo1
a reply to: SpeakerofTruth

Which is highly disturbing. Even more disturbing is thinking about all the ones that haven't been caught.

yes, that deserves repeating, surely.
And she looks so very normal….
tetra



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:33 PM
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a reply to: tetra50

I always find the people who say they can "like totes tell" from a picture someone is a psycho delusional. Sure someone like Manson, but a LOT are so nondescript. She does look pretty freaking normal.

Poisoning is the female serial killers weapon of choice. I wonder if she actively pursued her profession to be able to commit these atrocious crimes, or if she just realized one day she had access. I don't buy the "annoying" line. That sounds like a very flimsy excuse to keep the truth (that she enjoyed it) secret and appear somehow more normal.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:35 PM
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She should not have been doing that, that is the Doctors job.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 11:06 PM
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Did anyone else catch that she was previously accused of giving patients unnecessary laxatives?!

That right there should have been an investigation. People are going to be scared to go to this hospital.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 11:56 PM
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a reply to: badgerprints

Is this sarcastic? You know that hospice care is largely just about making people comfortable at home so they don't have to die in a hospital, right? That's like, what it's for.



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 12:03 AM
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a reply to: Iamthatbish

kinda gives new meaning to being on ones sh@@ list.

as others have said there are all kinds of examples of this happening. one that comes to mind that has been beat yet is
Charles Cullen. they say that they confirmed 40 victims, it is thought though his count is as high as 400.

here's a wiki on him.




Charles Edmund Cullen (born February 22, 1960) is a former nurse who is the most prolific serial killer in New Jersey history and is suspected to be the most prolific serial killer in American history.[1] He confessed to authorities that he killed up to 40 patients during the course of his 16-year nursing career.[2] But in subsequent interviews with police, psychiatric professionals, and journalists Charles Graeber and Steve Kroft,[3] it became clear that he had killed many more, whom he could not specifically remember by name, though he could often remember details of their case.[4] Experts have estimated that Charles Cullen may ultimately be responsible for some 400 murders, which would make him the most prolific serial killer in American history.[1]
Charles Cullen


here if you scroll down to 4 Medical professionals and quacks
a list of doctors , nurses, and other health care workers and the body count.



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 12:34 AM
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Situations like this can only be prevented with super high technology that is sure to come.
Something, somehow, must be able to interpret the intent of someone performing any procedure on a patient.
It will be a brain scanning app for sure, but it will not attempt to analyse the material being introduced to the patient, but instead, the intent the practitioner has on the well-being of the patient. It's gonna come, and it will probably be a while, but the focus is on intent, without worrying about the complications of analyzing what is being put in the patient. A super lie detector, if you will. Directed at the root cause.



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 01:04 AM
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originally posted by: badgerprints
You think that's bad?
Look at the death rate for people shortly after they go onto hospice care.
Killing is big business and there are large numbers of doctors and caregivers who make a living doing what that psycho did.


Well, technically hospice care is for people who only have a few weeks to live, so... the reason for hospice is to make them comfortable, in a homey atmosphere, no more. The 'making people comfortable' end of it is often increasing doses of morphine which can curtail breathing. Life saving measures are generally forbidden by contract. It would actually be in the best interests of hospices to have the patient live longer, thus more money. They're getting paid by the day and I'm certain have no shortage of people waiting for spaces. The families are often there most of the time, which would make situations like OPs much more difficult.



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 01:10 AM
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a reply to: hounddoghowlie

Any well trained medical professional has access to information (and chemicals) that could produce the best murder of all, a silent one. Most medical examiners are pretty lazy and will default the death certificate to whatever the person may have been suffering from chronically; heart disease, diabetes and cancer are the usuals. Many murder techniques would never show up on a tox screen as anomalous, too. While certain deaths may be a puzzle for the ME, the truth of the matter is that they're overwhelmed with new cases daily and only so much time can be spent on each individual.

The ones to really be worried about are the 'honest mistakes' which happen all too rarely and are often not caught, or if caught not reported. You'd shut down every hospital in the world if they did.







 
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