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My Experience With Saying No To Police

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posted on Oct, 12 2014 @ 03:37 PM
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So, first let me say, that I am totally one who believes that police have too much power, and you can see every day that it is clearly getting abused quite frequently. I'm one who tends to have a sort of 'I don't like cops' feeling, although I of course acknowledge that they do much that is good and needed. But I also fundamentally disagree with a good portion of what they do, so I can't like them too much. But I always say, it's not that I dislike cops as people, I'm sure there are many good people who are cops, I just dislike the profession itself. I hate the mentality of 'just upholding the law.' Some of the greatest evil in this planet's history has been a result of just following the law, or the general power structure and chain of command. Police used to enforce racism here in America. They executed the will of all the evil dictators. I can't agree with the mentality of 'just uphold the law,' or 'just follow orders,' at all.

Anyways, I'd like to share a story. I was pulled over, the cop asked for license and registration, the basics. After a bit, he asks me if he can search my car. I'm going to paraphrase what I said. 'Well, I'm gonna have to say no that. And it's honestly not that I'm doing anything wrong, or hiding anything, I just don't feel that there is any reason why this situation should cause my car to be searched, and so I'm gonna have to say no.' He basically said that's ok, you have that right. And he was honestly cool about it, he just let me go basically. I generally give people a good and positive impression when they interact with me, people get the impression that I'm a nice good person who wouldn't do anything wrong. I'm neither saying that I'm a bad person nor perfect, but this impression I seem to give people has definitely served me well in life at times. I'm not sure how much this played into the cop being okay with me refusing his request to search my car. But I also think my just being honest and up front, and while refusing his search being calm and non-confrontational, rationally explaining my viewpoint, is a lot of what did it.

But yea, that was a pretty positive experience with me not just complying with whatever a police officer wanted. To be honest with you, I haven't really had too much bad experience with cops. I mean, interaction with a cop can basically never be positive, but it's never been really bad for me personally, as good as it can be. At the same time, I do certainly see these stories that seem to be happening all the time of cops totally abusing their power and doing horrible things. And just being assholes to boot. But I have to say, with a lot of these videos intended to make police look bad, the people(non-cop) are generally being unnecessarily hostile and confrontational. Very often the cops over-react, but at the same time the person was also being pretty confrontational and unnecessarily difficult for no real reason. So, I absolutely do not approve of abuse of power by police. I think they have too much as it is, and I fundamentally disagree with much of what they do. But at the same time, I see no reason why you shouldn't be basically easy-going and friendly with police. Stand up for yourself, don't let yourself be taken advantage of, be smart, but at the same time I don't know why you would want to be confrontational with them.




posted on Oct, 12 2014 @ 04:20 PM
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Next time try, "Only if I can search yours at the same time."



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:05 AM
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a reply to: TheJourney

You got lucky. No, is not a word they like to hear. I had a run in a few years back with them. No was the answer to all of their questions, regarding searches, tests, breathalyzers, statements. I said nothing and did nothing. It infuriated them. You see, whenever you do or say anything, you are giving them evidence, and in reality trying your case on the side of the road. No evidence= no ammo.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:18 AM
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If I were to deny a cop's request to a vehicle search, it would depend on the cop's reason for wanting to do so.

If the cop had a truthfully valid reason, like a crime report involving a vehicle fitting my car's description, I may submit to a search in order to have a record that my particular vehicle was cleared of any suspicion. If the cop seemed to be making stuff up or refused to give a valid reason, I would politely refuse, but certainly submit if threatened or intimidated. No need to stir up some roid rage in a mouth breathing, knuckle dragging, gun carrying, Nazi-KKK type cop itching to pound a perp into hamburger.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:29 AM
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If the cop had a truthfully valid reason, like a crime report involving a vehicle fitting my car's description, I may submit to a search in order to have a record that my particular vehicle was cleared of any suspicion.


They could most likely call it probable cause and search it anyway. If they are asking, they are fishing and hoping the person made a mistake.
edit on 10/13/2014 by roadgravel because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 11:52 AM
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a reply to: TheJourney

just say

"your going to do whatever you want to do, so I am not sure why you are even asking me"

say it in a way that you seem like you have been defeated, and have no choice, and are powerless

do not say yes or anything else that verbally give him / her permission to do a search

if they ask you again just say

"your going to do whatever you want to do"

if they are smart eventually they will give up, and not search your car

if they do, you did not give them permissions and can press charges (video or voice recording probably needed)

When you flat out say NO and refuse you are basically challenging their authority in their mind and they do not like that

saying "your going to do whatever you want to do" is not challenging at all, not bruising their ego, and not giving them permission


edit on 13-10-2014 by cavrac because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:04 PM
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At the age of eleven... a cop pulled up along side me and got out of his car... and walked right up to me.... and started choking me.
He said I was spray painting at the school yard two blocks down... and ran off when they were spotted.
He said my Oakland raiders jacket was what the description was.
My particular jacket said raiders on the back.
The true culprit's jacket was almost the same but instead of saying raiders... it had in fact the logo of the raiders on the back.
I saw the culprit just moments before the incident.
When I explained that maybe they were looking for a logo jacket rather than a letters jacket... he let me go.

Sucks to be me.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:13 PM
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originally posted by: MichiganSwampBuck
If I were to deny a cop's request to a vehicle search, it would depend on the cop's reason for wanting to do so.

If the cop had a truthfully valid reason, like a crime report involving a vehicle fitting my car's description, I may submit to a search in order to have a record that my particular vehicle was cleared of any suspicion. If the cop seemed to be making stuff up or refused to give a valid reason, I would politely refuse, but certainly submit if threatened or intimidated. No need to stir up some roid rage in a mouth breathing, knuckle dragging, gun carrying, Nazi-KKK type cop itching to pound a perp into hamburger.
This is an extremely rational way of looking at it, and fits with my view as well.

the only thing I would add is that if you ever DO submit, record it, and inform them they are being recorded.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:17 PM
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originally posted by: roadgravel


If the cop had a truthfully valid reason, like a crime report involving a vehicle fitting my car's description, I may submit to a search in order to have a record that my particular vehicle was cleared of any suspicion.


They could most likely call it probable cause and search it anyway. If they are asking, they are fishing and hoping the person made a mistake.
Thats not always the case at all.

Ive personally been on the other side of this. A cop had me dead to rights on a small amount of medicine in my car. He knew it was there, and I knew it was there. He could have easily pulled the probable cause card.

In that instance, he asked my permission. I gave it to him, knowing he had me either way, and told him about what was in my car, and exactly where to find it.

The cop was extremely civil, and outside of confiscating what I had (which, by the way, was legal, but I did not have my card on me), let me go.

Each situation calls for assessment. Those situations are fluid, and sometimes you just have to go with your gut.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: TheJourney




Well, I'm gonna have to say no that. And it's honestly not that I'm doing anything wrong, or hiding anything, I just don't feel that there is any reason why this situation should cause my car to be searched, and so I'm gonna have to say no


Glad it worked out ok for you. But you really don't have to give a reason why you're exercising your rights. Just say 'I don't consent to a search'. You don't need to answer or justify yourself to any officer. You don't have to calm his suspicions, nor answer to his summations of you and your activities.



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