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A health care worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital has tested positive for Ebola

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posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 03:15 AM
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a reply to: Maya00a


Does anyone actually know the medical definition of airborne'? I'm beginning to wonder if it's only considered airborne if it can travel beyond a certain distance or stay up in the air for a certain amount of time.


Let me help. A pathogen would be classified as airborne if it could get into a ventilation system and remain in a viable condition with the potential to infect others. This strain cannot. If it could the rate of infection would be well over twenty times what we're seeing now. It's already bad that the rate of infection is exponential ... just imagine that at 25 to 60 times the exponential rate.

Also, one must consider this to 'believe' what I'm telling you has merit. Have you ever seen a dust particle suspended in the air? You would not be able to see Ebola. The size of Ebola is measured on the scale of nanometers (about 600 if memory serves) while the 'diameter' of dust is measured on the scale of micrometers. Imagine slicing up that stand of dust up along its diameter 10,000 times and you begin to get an idea of how small a single virion (virus particle) of Ebola is.

Could it float around in the air? Of course it could. Could you become infected by it? Quite possibly ... but the R nought is proving otherwise.

-Cheers
edit on 14102014 by Snarl because: Page transition. Added quoted text for clarity.




posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 03:47 AM
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originally posted by: ~Lucidity
Hmmm....


Ebola survivor Dr. Kent Brantly has again donated blood to help treat someone fighting the virus — this time a nurse who is the first person to contract the disease within the United States, a spokesman for Samaritan’s Purse told NBC News Monday. Brantly, who still works for the aid group, traveled to Dallas on Sunday to make the donation for Nina Pham, a nurse at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital who helped to treat a Liberian man who died there last week, said Jeremy Blume, a spokesperson for Samaritan's Purse. [Source]


Guess Pham is the same blood type. So now the third time donating for Brantly.
edit on 10/14/2014 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 05:33 AM
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CNN's Sanjay Gupta did a demonstration on the protective gear hospitals wear and how to take it off according to CDC guidelines. He spread chocolate sauce on the front of the gown and his gloved hands, then attempted to take all the gear off. When he finished he had chocolate sauce on his wrist and his neck. He was very surprised that he had it on his neck. He said he gets cuts from shaving so it would be easy to get infected there. He was very surprised and concerned that the protective gear left open gaps.

The hospital workers who treated Duncan (and all other workers, too!) are screwed!



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 05:44 AM
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originally posted by: texasgirl
CNN's Sanjay Gupta did a demonstration on the protective gear hospitals wear and how to take it off according to CDC guidelines. He spread chocolate sauce on the front of the gown and his gloved hands, then attempted to take all the gear off. When he finished he had chocolate sauce on his wrist and his neck. He was very surprised that he had it on his neck. He said he gets cuts from shaving so it would be easy to get infected there. He was very surprised and concerned that the protective gear left open gaps.

The hospital workers who treated Duncan (and all other workers, too!) are screwed!

Do you have a link for this, I can't seem to find it



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 05:47 AM
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originally posted by: whatcomesnext130

originally posted by: texasgirl
CNN's Sanjay Gupta did a demonstration on the protective gear hospitals wear and how to take it off according to CDC guidelines. He spread chocolate sauce on the front of the gown and his gloved hands, then attempted to take all the gear off. When he finished he had chocolate sauce on his wrist and his neck. He was very surprised that he had it on his neck. He said he gets cuts from shaving so it would be easy to get infected there. He was very surprised and concerned that the protective gear left open gaps.

The hospital workers who treated Duncan (and all other workers, too!) are screwed!

Do you have a link for this, I can't seem to find it



No link. It was on CNN last night. I imagine they will show it again. Multiple times.



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 05:48 AM
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a reply to: texasgirl

Wow, that definitely points to a defect in the protocol. Wonder why they don't use a chlorine (bleach) based spray over the whole person to try and kill the virus, before removing the gear? It just seems like that would be a simple thing to do.



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 05:50 AM
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Here's a link I found!

www.ac360.blogs.cnn.com...



*** I can't get the link to work. Can someone help?
edit on 14-10-2014 by texasgirl because: added more



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 05:53 AM
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originally posted by: texasgirl

originally posted by: whatcomesnext130

originally posted by: texasgirl
CNN's Sanjay Gupta did a demonstration on the protective gear hospitals wear and how to take it off according to CDC guidelines. He spread chocolate sauce on the front of the gown and his gloved hands, then attempted to take all the gear off. When he finished he had chocolate sauce on his wrist and his neck. He was very surprised that he had it on his neck. He said he gets cuts from shaving so it would be easy to get infected there. He was very surprised and concerned that the protective gear left open gaps.

The hospital workers who treated Duncan (and all other workers, too!) are screwed!

Do you have a link for this, I can't seem to find it




No link. It was on CNN last night. I imagine they will show it again. Multiple times.

I'll keep an eye out for it, thanks for the info. So CDC were asleep at the wheel and didn't protect the health care workers so sad
edit on 14-10-2014 by whatcomesnext130 because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-10-2014 by whatcomesnext130 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 05:55 AM
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I wouldn't be surprised based how much info one can get on this site/thread if we start seeing odd things. Im sure with a click of a button ATS could be offline. I learn more about whats REALLY going here then most websites and news.

On a side note. WTF was the boyfriend not quarantined if the facebook story is true? He should have never been at work or around people. DAHHHH

I cn honestly say this is the first time in my life Im truly scared about the future! Between Ebola, ISIS, and the economic meltdown that is soon to happen I think things are going to be very different in the months to come.



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 06:13 AM
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a reply to: kaylaluv

I agree on spraying and sitting for a bit while waiting for the chemical agent to kill off any virus particles that may be on the suit.

But what I actually think is they all should be using Biohazard level 4 safety suits... I guess they don't have enough resources to divvy those out to all of our health care professionals.




leolady



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 07:16 AM
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originally posted by: texasgirl

originally posted by: whatcomesnext130

originally posted by: texasgirl
CNN's Sanjay Gupta did a demonstration on the protective gear hospitals wear and how to take it off according to CDC guidelines. He spread chocolate sauce on the front of the gown and his gloved hands, then attempted to take all the gear off. When he finished he had chocolate sauce on his wrist and his neck. He was very surprised that he had it on his neck. He said he gets cuts from shaving so it would be easy to get infected there. He was very surprised and concerned that the protective gear left open gaps.

The hospital workers who treated Duncan (and all other workers, too!) are screwed!

Do you have a link for this, I can't seem to find it



No link. It was on CNN last night. I imagine they will show it again. Multiple times.

I see the link now www.cnn.com...

edit on 14-10-2014 by whatcomesnext130 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 07:20 AM
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a reply to: texasgirl

No problem. It's on YouTube now.
EDIT to add: Kudos to texasgirl for being the first on this thread to alert us to the existence of Dr. Gupta's demonstration. Thank you!(End ETA)


...And that's what happens when you follow CDC standard protocols.

And remember, Sanjay Gupta is a surgeon, who's worked under sterile procedures many, many times. If he'd had Ebola on that PPE instead of chocolate sauce, he'd potentially be infected now.
edit on 14/10/14 by JustMike because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 07:24 AM
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originally posted by: JustMike
a reply to: texasgirl

No problem. It's on YouTube now.



...And that's what happens when you follow CDC standard protocols.

And remember, Sanjay Gupta is a surgeon, who's worked under sterile procedures many, many times. If he'd had Ebola on that PPE instead of chocolate sauce, he'd potentially be infected now.

He looks a bit ticked off too after doing so, and he thinks it's an absurd way to do it.



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 07:28 AM
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a reply to: leolady

while that would be ideal its simply not practical, it largely comes down to resources of the state and hospital.. those types of suits are not just sitting around at all hospitals and even if they were you cant just take an er doctor and nurse put them in the suit and expect them to perform. people are trained specifically for working in them and im talking a handful of people, i know of less than 10 specialists in my state that can work effectively at bsl 4.
chlorine or chemical showers are the norm where i work but this is a specific facility designed for this type of scenario regular hospitals simply dont have the equipment in place for that type of procedure.. spraying liquids on people in protective gear isnt always a great idea unless its done right.

edit: also just because a hospital might have a bsl4 lab does not always mean that they can treat someone at that level. The lab is for testing the actual treatment takes place in a separate facility. Some hospitals will have both on site in the same facility but not all have this as it is extremely extensive and occupies a very large space.. our facility is about the size of a standard ward but only has 2 beds, try convincing governments thats a good investment when the ER is overflowing...
edit on 14-10-2014 by D4rcyJones because: bsl4 lab and treatment facilities



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 07:33 AM
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a reply to: JustMike

appreciate the video will share with my team tomorrow... i should point out that while he is a surgeon, maybe even a great one, there is a difference between what he does everyday and what an infectious disease specialist does.
but how did he get it on his neck, that is very interesting :s



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 07:44 AM
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originally posted by: D4rcyJones
a reply to: JustMike

appreciate the video will share with my team tomorrow... i should point out that while he is a surgeon, maybe even a great one, there is a difference between what he does everyday and what an infectious disease specialist does.
but how did he get it on his neck, that is very interesting :s



I imagine he got it on his neck from taking off the head gear. Remember, he had it on his wrist so it must've brushed onto his neck.



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 07:51 AM
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a reply to: texasgirl

i suspect youre right... there is no other way that i can imagine it got there. His gloves should have been taped to the gown sleeves.. they might have been im watching on a phone and cant clearly see.



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 07:52 AM
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originally posted by: D4rcyJones
a reply to: texasgirl

i suspect youre right... there is no other way that i can imagine it got there. His gloves should have been taped to the gown sleeves.. they might have been im watching on a phone and cant clearly see.




No, there was no taping the gloves to the gown. Crazy, isn't it?



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 07:56 AM
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a reply to: texasgirl

i am surprised they arent... im almost certain that our guidelines specify doubled gloves taped to sleeve and most our stuff gets adapted from cdc, will look into this tomorrow at work.



posted on Oct, 14 2014 @ 08:07 AM
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a reply to: D4rcyJones
Oh, no argument.


Also, just want to express my appreciation for your expert comments re bsl 4. I'm guessing you wouldn't want to go near a patient with a biohazard 4 pathogen infection in the limited PPE he was wearing. He's nowhere near fully covered.



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