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A health care worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital has tested positive for Ebola

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posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 05:55 PM
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So what's with the Pandora thing today?? Any news?




posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 05:57 PM
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originally posted by: jefwane
a reply to: fwkitziger
That's insane i remember gloves being the last piece of equipment taken off after a chemical decon in NBC training. I've heard the arguments about why double gloving may cause some problems but a rubber glove over a latex glove just seems smart when you're dealing with something as dangerous as ebola.


Gloves off first now: CDC Removal Instructions

And they wash hands after all gear removed.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 05:59 PM
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Is anyone watching CNN? There's a conference coming on about a possible new Ebola patient in Kansas City? Kansas State University holding a conference?



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:05 PM
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a reply to: fwkitziger

That removal procedure doesn't make any sense to me!!!!!! That can't be correct. I mean I'm sure that's how it is written but... jeez
edit on 13-10-2014 by ValentineWiggin because: (no reason given)



In my mind I just see... arms covered in droplets of ebola infected fluids. Take gloves off first..reach back to untie neck, then when pulling gown forward to remove those droplets roll down the arm and onto the fingers.


Right!?
edit on 13-10-2014 by ValentineWiggin because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:12 PM
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US gov, Texas and CDC are blowing this big time.

The first case should be the easiest. There are no other distractions. All those practice runs or processes that have been going on over for years should be put into effect now. Instead it's freaking amateur hour. What happens when we have 10 cases or 100 or 1000?

It turns out that this new ebola patient was the man's nurse and she was not being monitored by the CDC.
edit on 13-10-2014 by Vrill because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:13 PM
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70 doctors and nurses helped Thomas Duncan. 70!!!



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:15 PM
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a reply to: texasgirl

Holy cow.

I don't even think there are 70 nurses in our whole Hospital here.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:16 PM
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Also, I'm relieved this man from Texas has died. I felt that he should have been given some advil and an IV. He lied his way out of a quarantine situation after knowingly being exposed to Ebola. If he lived it sets a precedent to flee to the US or elsewhere for superior care.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:17 PM
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originally posted by: ValentineWiggin
a reply to: fwkitziger

That removal procedure doesn't make any sense to me!!!!!! That can't be correct. I mean I'm sure that's how it is written but... jeez


In my mind I just see... arms covered in droplets of ebola infected fluids. Take gloves off first..reach back to untie neck, then when pulling gown forward to remove those droplets roll down the arm and onto the fingers.


Right!?

Exactly right. My friend said all the non-frontline doctors were watching the new protocol today after that idiot blamed the nurse, and the reaction was unanimous "WTF? Nobody does it that way".



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:17 PM
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a reply to: fwkitziger
The CDC is advising gloves, masks and gowns for these health care workers, when they should be following biosafety level 4 practices?

These health workers should be in biohazard suits and full face shields/respirators. Their gloves should be taped at the wrists. The suits must be full-body and taped to the disposable boots.

And before the gloves are removed they should be decontaminated... In fact, my understanding is the whole suit should be decontaminated before removal.

Are they actually telling these people to remove PPE that has not been decontaminated first?

Good Lord... This is just appalling.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:23 PM
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a reply to: texasgirl

I saw your post, so I looked for a story. I found one in the Kansas City Star. They mentioned that the possible ebola patient is being isolated in an area of the hospital that has its own ventilation system.
Why?
The disease is not airborne, so why mention that?
At the end of the story, they stress that the disease is not airborne.
WITH.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:30 PM
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CNN is reporting she has gotten a blood transfusion, unclear if it's of a survivor but I'd bet it is.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:32 PM
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lol, We called him Dr. Doogie. This kid was amazing. He called my husband aside before we left and thanked him for being nice to him (I was in and out of consciousness most of the time). Hubby was surprised and asked about it...Dr. Doogie (whom we keep up with even now after 16 years) said that most people thought he was creepy because of his youth plus intelligence...either that or they just didn't take him seriously. He's doing great things, and we're so blessed to have met him!



originally posted by: idmonster

originally posted by: roadgravel


My doctor? A 19 year old who had been out of medical school for 4 YEARS.


A doctor at 15? If the person doesn't have a Nobel prize, I think I would pass. 3rd world medical school or what.


Were you treated by doogie howser?



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:34 PM
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originally posted by: texasgirl
70 doctors and nurses helped Thomas Duncan. 70!!!


No wonder one of the new protocols they mentioned was only a few doctors and nurses assigned to a patient.

That many helping one patient is asking for trouble. If there is some kind of problem, a huge number of health care workers need to be taken out of service and quarantined.
... oh yeah ... that is what happened in Dallas.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:34 PM
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originally posted by: JustMike
a reply to: fwkitziger
The CDC is advising gloves, masks and gowns for these health care workers, when they should be following biosafety level 4 practices?

These health workers should be in biohazard suits and full face shields/respirators. Their gloves should be taped at the wrists. The suits must be full-body and taped to the disposable boots.

And before the gloves are removed they should be decontaminated... In fact, my understanding is the whole suit should be decontaminated before removal.

Are they actually telling these people to remove PPE that has not been decontaminated first?

Good Lord... This is just appalling.


My Doctor friend first called me last week asking about Ebola because he knows I studied the epidemic in the course of my work supporting a team in Liberia (from Houston, energy biz). I told him that protocol in Africa was cover everything, tape seams and get a Clorox spray-down before removing. I could not believe it when he told me they just wore the basics.
edit on 13-10-2014 by fwkitziger because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:36 PM
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originally posted by: ValentineWiggin
CNN is reporting she has gotten a blood transfusion, unclear if it's of a survivor but I'd bet it is.



Yes, it's an Ebola survivor. But they're not naming who it is.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:36 PM
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That's downright enraging and heartbreaking all at once.


originally posted by: fwkitziger
This just in from Doctor at Dallas Health Presbyterian ....Duncan's dialysis doctor and another nurse are running fever and are suspected for Ebola, tests are underway. Doctor tells me the CDC protocol is likely to blame. The protocol for removing infected gear for his 40 year career was to take off your garment first with gloves still on because the gloves are over the sleeve ends. When you pulled off the sleeves, the latex gloves would roll up a bit. Then you used two fingers under the glove roll and whipped off the contaminated glove. But after SARS, the WHO and CDC came up with the opposite....taker off you gloves first then remove the nasty garment without gloves....he calls this insanity and did not know the new protocol until today when he watched the CDC video at the hospital. It is likely that the dialysis team was all using the new CDC protocol. The incompetence of the Feds strikes again.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:38 PM
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originally posted by: texasgirl
70 doctors and nurses helped Thomas Duncan. 70!!!


Here's a link



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:40 PM
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originally posted by: Gully

originally posted by: texasgirl
70 doctors and nurses helped Thomas Duncan. 70!!!


Here's a link



Thanks! Unbelievable.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 06:42 PM
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Q: How else could infection have happened?
A: Some of the garb the health worker takes off might brush against a surface and contaminate it. New data suggest that even tiny droplets of a patient’s body fluids can contain the virus, Maki said.[/B]
“I can have on the suit and be very careful, but I can pick up some secretions or body fluids on a surface” and spread it that way, he said.

Source



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