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A health care worker at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital has tested positive for Ebola

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posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 08:54 AM
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originally posted by: antar
My question of the day:

The nurse at Presbyterian is in "Isolation"

The family that lived in the apartment with Duncan is in "Quarantine"

At what point do we get the news that the family is showing symptoms or that death has occurred? The media is not even asking although it has been the top question on everyone's mind since they were whisked away to the undisclosed location.

So if you were in isolation verses quarantine, does that raise the chances of survive-ability?


Fox news brought this up and said a lot of the public is concerned that a nurse contracted Ebola but the family in the apartment where Duncan died has yet to show symptoms. I don't remember which doctor answered but she kind of danced around the subject and eventually said they don't know yet why some people seem to be infected while others never show symptoms. That was the end of it. No more pressing of the subject.

I want to see what Anderson Cooper does tonight on CNN. Maybe he'll bring this up again and get some answers about Louise Troh and her family.





posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:07 AM
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a reply to: texasgirl
It doesn't add up, does it?

A nurse using full PPE allegedly "breached protocol" and became infected, but the family who lived in the same apt. as Duncan for days (even after he finally got taken to hospital) are apparently all perfectly ok?

Or at least, they're not being reported as not okay.

I've mentioned it before somewhere, but I'm wondering why a major, MSM station can't just set up a skype interview with the family. I'm sure they have internet in that gated community location in Dallas. If they're all fine, why not let them appear on TV via skype so everyone's reassured? Or at least Ms Troh. I appreciate they're grieving the loss of their loved one (Mr Duncan) but one quick interview with eg Anderson Cooper would help to allay a lot of people's fears. And suspicions.



edit on 13/10/14 by JustMike because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:12 AM
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a reply to: antar

I'm with you on this.

If this



represents transmit-ability, with blue representing being infected and red representing showing all symptoms, at which point along the scale is there "enough" red to be considered infectious?

Somewhere along that line must be a point of very low level symptoms, with enough virus to be infectious.

More than happy to have this explained, and be corrected by any virologists out there.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:15 AM
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originally posted by: JustMike
a reply to: texasgirl
It doesn't add up, does it?

A nurse using full PPE allegedly "breached protocol" and became infected, but the family who lived in the same apt. as Duncan for days (even after he finally got taken to hospital) are apparently all perfectly ok?


Which is more or less exactly what they said about the Spanish nurse. I'm almost certain that in both cases the phrase, "touched her face when removing her mask" has been used.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:24 AM
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I seem to remember that the media mentioned Louise Troh does not have tv or internet access in her new, undisclosed location. If it's a nice, gated home on rolling hills you would think they'd have TV at least!!

What's going on here?



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:34 AM
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Then the anchor switches to a doctor William Schaffner from Vanderbilt, who said the opposite. Basically, he had "informally" learned of an ebola patient treated in the US who received dialysis and/or was intubated, and lived.

What the heck? I'm going to see if I can find a new online article that repeats this info, but I know that is what I heard.


ETA: They are discussing his comments, now.


I'll tell ya, our son was born at Vandy and lived there for a month. That place has the best of the best....I nearly died of toxemia. My doctor? A 19 year old who had been out of medical school for 4 YEARS. If Vandy says it, I believe it.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:49 AM
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Ebola Does Dallas: www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:21 AM
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a reply to: Xeven

What's the worry?

98% of you think that you will be in heaven after you die.
1% think they will be in hell (told by the 98% above).
1% could care less.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:22 AM
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originally posted by: JustMike

originally posted by: butcherguy
a reply to: JustMike
Both of those guys that I watched when that presser was on live seemed to be very nervous.
I wonder why.
Maybe because they know more than we do.


What really worries me is maybe they know less than we do.

Or knew less -- and now have learned a little more. Like, wandering around in an Ebola patient's apartment in street clothes and shoes and zero PPE is not a bright idea, CDC assurances notwithstanding.


ignorance + ego + authority = the kind of response we're seeing right now. Unfortunately, they're above the law and beyond prosecution ... with the minor 'court of public opinion' being the only exception. Their cronies have them covered.

Because they're so uninformed, inexperienced and unprepared ... they're probably not going to believe it when healthcare workers walk off the job (just like the aircraft cleaning crews ... except forever). The rank and file healthcare staff don't respond well when they're lied to or fed 'select' bits of information.

TBH, I can't believe there aren't a LOT of folks not showing up to work at the hospital where Duncan was treated. I think there is probably an absentee issue which is NOT being addressed by the MSM at the direction of TPTB. Bet this ... first Ebola patient admitted to the hospital where I work, will mark the last day of my employment ... SYN!!



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:29 AM
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a reply to: Snarl



Bet this ... first Ebola patient admitted to the hospital where I work, will mark the last day of my employment

I can't blame you one bit.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:34 AM
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My doctor? A 19 year old who had been out of medical school for 4 YEARS.


A doctor at 15? If the person doesn't have a Nobel prize, I think I would pass. 3rd world medical school or what.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: LurkingRelentlessly


i take it you havent read this article yet.


NEW YORK – A group of German medical doctors in a peer-reviewed medical journal article published by Oxford University Press have challenged a key assumption regarding the Ebola virus repeatedly asserted by Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. The researchers found that a patient showing no symptoms of the disease can still transmit a virus like Ebola by air if droplets containing the virus are transmitted to another person by a sneeze or cough.


Yeah... you should really check up on the sources used to put together this little spin piece. Notice the phrasing very carefully: "researchers found that a patient showing no symptoms of the disease can still transmit a virus like Ebola by air if droplets containing the virus are transmitted to another person by a sneeze or cough.

Why does the article say, "like Ebola"? It says that because the original article does not deal with Ebola at all. It actually deals with Norovirus infections in renal transplant patients.. So what does this article really tell us? It tells us that viruses which are similar to Ebola may be transmittable before the host begins showing symptoms. That's not very conclusive. You might as well say a team like the Oakland Raiders won the Super Bowl in February.

"Droplets" are liquid, they are bodily fluids. Yes, droplets can move through the air a short distance, but this does NOT makes Ebola an airborne virus. It seems to me that this article you've linked to is exactly what I spoke out against in my initial post: fear mongering.

This site amazes me sometimes. I know there are a lot of really smart people that frequent these boards; let's use our critical thinking skills to find a balance between blind adherence to government/CDC dogma and blind adherence to alternative sources. The truth is usually somewhere in the middle, not at the extremes.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:43 AM
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What is most unusual and most under-addressed so far is this :

Infection through the skin .

A very unpalatable proposition indeed .



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:56 AM
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a reply to: antar
I believe they are talking about the ashes of the belongings that were in the apartment Mr. Duncan was staying in, like curtains and rugs, etc.

No, I believe Mr. Duncan's body was treated as it should be, and his ashes were returned to relatives in a urn....not like yesterday's garbage and hauled off to a landfill.


edit on 13-10-2014 by RoyalBlue because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:58 AM
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originally posted by: ZIPMATT
What is most unusual and most under-addressed so far is this :

Infection through the skin .

A very unpalatable proposition indeed .

Yes, the virus can be found in the sweat of contagious individuals and it can pass through your skin.
You can contract ebola by shaking hands with an infected person that is shedding virus.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 10:59 AM
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Through the skin , described by WHO as 'direct contact' ...



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 11:01 AM
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a reply to: texasgirl

Thank you! I am so glad to hear the puppy might get a reprieve if he does not test positive. I had not heard the decision.

I did see in some article last night that someone went in with hazmat suit on to give the dog food and water. That is really nice they did that, but it made me laugh. I could just picture my dog's reaction if someone came in to our house dressed like that. I think she would freak out and hide and never come out.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 11:02 AM
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CDC training questioned after director blames nurse's Ebola infection on 'protocol breach'

The video in the article states she was one of the nurses caring for Duncan, but initial reports stated she was on of the one who checked him in. Also the staff treating him were told to "self monitor" and were NOT on the list of the 48+ people being watched by the CDC.


As the head of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention blames a "protocol breach" for the infection of a Dallas nurse with Ebola, questions are being raised over whether the CDC is capable of providing the adequate training for hundreds of thousands of health care workers -- who are at the front-lines of the fight against Ebola in America.


This would make sense since it's only been health care workers to contract it so far.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 11:07 AM
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originally posted by: ZIPMATT
What is most unusual and most under-addressed so far is this :

Infection through the skin .

A very unpalatable proposition indeed .


TPTB are trying to spin this possibility out of every public statement. My question would be, "If an Ebola victim can shed the virus through their sweat, why is it 'impossible' for a healthy person to become infected through a reverse process?"

Personally, I can understand that this is indeed a remote possibility, but it cannot be ruled out entirely. Since the Hippocratic Oath specifically prohibits certain practices, and since Ebola is so incredibly deadly, they're probably not likely to confirm your concerns ... and will stick to their OS.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 11:19 AM
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a reply to: blackcatmagic

I guess this needs repeating here...

CDC head criticized for blaming 'protocol breach' as nurse gets Ebola


Some experts also question the CDC’s assertion that any U.S. hospital should be prepared to treat an Ebola patient as the outbreak ravaging West Africa begins to spread globally. Given the level of training required to do the job safely, U.S. health authorities should consider designating a hospital in each region as the go-to facility for Ebola, they said.

"You don't scapegoat and blame when you have a disease outbreak," said Bonnie Castillo, a registered nurse and a disaster relief expert at National Nurses United, which serves as both a union and a professional association for U.S. nurses. "We have a system failure. That is what we have to correct."




edit on 10/13/2014 by ~Lucidity because: dang phone



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