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Food Porn

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posted on Jan, 20 2015 @ 10:33 AM
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originally posted by: QuailSeed

Thank you so much for answering my questions. I really appreciate it. Let me take a wild guess: I bet you actually make your own pasta.


But of course. Haven't you seen the pictures in the thread?

I make most of my pasta other then some of the dried, semolina pastas that are more economical to purchase than make.




posted on Jan, 20 2015 @ 10:50 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: QuailSeed

Thank you so much for answering my questions. I really appreciate it. Let me take a wild guess: I bet you actually make your own pasta.


But of course. Haven't you seen the pictures in the thread?

I make most of my pasta other then some of the dried, semolina pastas that are more economical to purchase than make.


Honestly, I had to go thru the entire thread to look at your photos again. I spotted the tortelloni and the lasagna.
Are you including gnocchi under the "Pasta" heading?

Which semolina pastas are more economical to buy ready-made?

What are your favorite pasta brands?



posted on Jan, 20 2015 @ 10:59 AM
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originally posted by: QuailSeed
[
Honestly, I had to go thru the entire thread to look at your photos again. I spotted the tortelloni and the lasagna.
Are you including gnocchi under the "Pasta" heading?


Yes, gnocchi is definitely included in that category.


Which semolina pastas are more economical to buy ready-made?


All the hard pastas; ziti, linguini, spaghetti, capellini.


What are your favorite pasta brands?


Barilla, Creamette and De Ceco are good if you cannot find some of the smaller producers such as Colavita or Gentile.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 11:57 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: QuailSeed
[
Honestly, I had to go thru the entire thread to look at your photos again. I spotted the tortelloni and the lasagna.
Are you including gnocchi under the "Pasta" heading?


Yes, gnocchi is definitely included in that category.


Which semolina pastas are more economical to buy ready-made?


All the hard pastas; ziti, linguini, spaghetti, capellini.


What are your favorite pasta brands?


Barilla, Creamette and De Ceco are good if you cannot find some of the smaller producers such as Colavita or Gentile.


Thank you so much for answering my questions. Barilla is my "go-to" pasta. I've never made pasta (except spaetzle, if that counts) -- so I buy all of my pasta.

Creamette is not so common here, but I do like their macaroni. (I like Ronzoni's macaroni too, but their other forms not as much). De Cecco is good too. I've seen the Colavita olive oil, but not their pasta. Gentile brand pasta I've never seen or heard of.

There's an "overstock" store here that sometimes carries various brands of Italian pasta that I've never seen anywhere else. Unfortunately, because it's an overstock store, there's no guarantee of ever seeing the same item twice:

DiNicola pasta boasts that it's made from 100% "Hard Amber Durum" (?) Wheat and natural spring water.

Arrighi (1930) is also "100% finest durum semolina." Both brands are good IMHO.

Then I came across DaVinci brand Bucatini. Love this stuff for pasta salad (I break it up into about 2 inch pieces before cooking).

Of course you know what Bucatini & Perciatelli are, but for anyone else who might be reading this: Bucatini looks like thick spaghetti but with a tiny hole in the center. (This is the first time I've seen it). Perciatelli is a slightly larger edition of Bucatini.

I'm going to look up "Gentile" brand pasta. I'm learning a lot here. Thank you.



posted on Jan, 21 2015 @ 03:27 PM
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originally posted by: QuailSeed
[
Of course you know what Bucatini & Perciatelli are...


Perciatelli is one of my favorites as it stands up well to some of the spicier dishes I like to prepare.



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 11:31 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: QuailSeed
[
Of course you know what Bucatini & Perciatelli are...


Perciatelli is one of my favorites as it stands up well to some of the spicier dishes I like to prepare.


Are you willing to share a Perciatelli recipe or two for "some of the spicier dishes" here?



posted on Jan, 22 2015 @ 03:50 PM
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originally posted by: QuailSeed
Are you willing to share a Perciatelli recipe or two for "some of the spicier dishes" here?


Sure.

The traditional dish of Lazio, Amatriciana Sauce:

1 28oz can of plum tomatoes, pureed
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/4-1/2lb guanciale or pancetta diced
4 cloves garlic chopped
2 teaspoons crushed red pepper
1/2 cup grated fresh pecorino
fresh parsley for garnish
1 pound Perciatelli

Heat oil in heavy skillet over medium high heat and sauté guanciale or pancetta until slightly crisp. Add pepper and garlic and cook until garlic is fragrant. Add tomatoes and basil and reduce to low heat. Cook until sauce is thickened and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook pasta al dente and toss into skillet to dress. Add cheese and toss until coated. Add some of the pasta water if sauce is too thick. Sprinkle with parsley and drizzle with a bit of oil and serve.


This one is from southern Italy, Perciatelli and bottarga:

1lb cherry tomatoes
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon each slat and pepper

Slice tomatoes in half and toss in bowl with other ingredients until coated. Place in 175* preheated oven for 5 hours. Reserve.

4 cloves garlic sliced
1 chili pepper minced (your choice on how hot, I like habaneros)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup tomato sauce
fresh chopped parsley
1/4 cup toasted bread crumbs
1lb Perciatelli
1 ounce bottarga

In a heavy skillet over medium high heat sauté garlic and chilies until fragrant. Add sauce and reserved tomatoes and simmer. Cook pasta to al dente and add to sauce with parsley. Toss to coat and then plate. Grate bottarga over each dish and sprinkle with toasted bread crumbs.



edit on 22-1-2015 by AugustusMasonicus because: networkdude has no beer



posted on Jan, 23 2015 @ 12:38 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: QuailSeed
Are you willing to share a Perciatelli recipe or two for "some of the spicier dishes" here?


Sure.

The traditional dish of Lazio, Amatriciana Sauce:

1 28oz can of plum tomatoes, pureed
3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/4-1/2lb guanciale or pancetta diced
4 cloves garlic chopped
2 teaspoons crushed red pepper
1/2 cup grated fresh pecorino
fresh parsley for garnish
1 pound Perciatelli

Heat oil in heavy skillet over medium high heat and sauté guanciale or pancetta until slightly crisp. Add pepper and garlic and cook until garlic is fragrant. Add tomatoes and basil and reduce to low heat. Cook until sauce is thickened and add salt and pepper to taste. Cook pasta al dente and toss into skillet to dress. Add cheese and toss until coated. Add some of the pasta water if sauce is too thick. Sprinkle with parsley and drizzle with a bit of oil and serve.


This one is from southern Italy, Perciatelli and bottarga:

1lb cherry tomatoes
1 teaspoon sugar
1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil
1/2 teaspoon each slat and pepper

Slice tomatoes in half and toss in bowl with other ingredients until coated. Place in 175* preheated oven for 5 hours. Reserve.

4 cloves garlic sliced
1 chili pepper minced (your choice on how hot, I like habaneros)
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1/4 cup tomato sauce
fresh chopped parsley
1/4 cup toasted bread crumbs
1lb Perciatelli
1 ounce bottarga

In a heavy skillet over medium high heat sauté garlic and chilies until fragrant. Add sauce and reserved tomatoes and simmer. Cook pasta to al dente and add to sauce with parsley. Toss to coat and then plate. Grate bottarga over each dish and sprinkle with toasted bread crumbs.


Thank you so much for taking the time to share these recipes! Both sound delicious. Whole Foods does have pancetta and pecorino. I'm going to have search for the bottarga.

The Bourdain episode in Sardinia featured bottarga. If I'm not mistaken, I think Andrew Zimmern had some in Sicily.
Looked intriguing. I love seafood. Is there a substitute for bottarga?

Habaneros are too hot for me. Those cherry tomatoes -- 5 hours at 175 degrees, sounds like you would have a type of dried tomato. Yum.

I just looked up the bottarga. This is an expensive luxury item in my book. Would you believe Amazon offers many types.
There's even such a thing as "bottarga powder" -- what do you think of that?

So I've got to ask you -- what's your "go-to" bottarga?

Is there really a sub for bottarga?
edit on 23-1-2015 by QuailSeed because: to add info



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 08:53 AM
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originally posted by: QuailSeed

The Bourdain episode in Sardinia featured bottarga. If I'm not mistaken..


It did, I remember that one.


Is there a substitute for bottarga?


Hah, no. Sorta like, 'is there a substitute for caviar?'

Habaneros are too hot for me. Those cherry tomatoes -- 5 hours at 175 degrees, sounds like you would have a type of dried tomato. Yum.


There's even such a thing as "bottarga powder" -- what do you think of that?


You can get away with that but keep in mind the stuff lasts for ever in the fridge so it may be pricey upfront but it keeps well and it's addictive.


So I've got to ask you -- what's your "go-to" bottarga?


Cabras is good for mullet and Gold is good for tuna. They are both tasty.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 08:55 AM
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So last night we had crab cakes with red pepper coulis and homemade tarragon tartar sauce, snap peas with black bean sauce and sautéed shallots and a potato parmesan gratin.





posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 10:48 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: QuailSeed

The Bourdain episode in Sardinia featured bottarga. If I'm not mistaken..


It did, I remember that one.


Is there a substitute for bottarga?


Hah, no. Sorta like, 'is there a substitute for caviar?'

Habaneros are too hot for me. Those cherry tomatoes -- 5 hours at 175 degrees, sounds like you would have a type of dried tomato. Yum.


There's even such a thing as "bottarga powder" -- what do you think of that?


You can get away with that but keep in mind the stuff lasts for ever in the fridge so it may be pricey upfront but it keeps well and it's addictive.


So I've got to ask you -- what's your "go-to" bottarga?


Cabras is good for mullet and Gold is good for tuna. They are both tasty.


Thank you so much for answering my questions. It's nice bottarga keeps well -- that's good to know.
All I need is another food addiction.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 10:59 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

So last night we had crab cakes with red pepper coulis and homemade tarragon tartar sauce, snap peas with black bean sauce and sautéed shallots and a potato parmesan gratin.





Looks great! I love crab cakes, but I've never actually made any. I used to get frozen Phillips Maryland crab cakes, but my source stopped carrying that brand.


What type of red pepper do you use for the coulis?

That homemade tarragon tartar sauce sounds good, do you grow your own herbs?

I love Hellman's mayo, but you probably make your own from scratch.

Snap peas with black bean sauce -- I've heard of Chinese black bean sauce, is this what you use?

i would not have a problem cleaning my plate with any of the food you've shown on this thread.
edit on 24-1-2015 by QuailSeed because: to reformat



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 11:24 AM
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originally posted by: QuailSeed

What type of red pepper do you use for the coulis?


Bell pepper, the wife prefers the sweeter flavor, which I then roast and sauté with shallot, garlic and chicken stock.


That homemade tarragon tartar sauce sounds good, do you grow your own herbs?


Yes, I have a fairly decent size herb garden and I also bring ins some for the winter so I can use them year round.


I love Hellman's mayo, but you probably make your own from scratch.


Actually, I use the Japanese mayo because I like the flavor.


Snap peas with black bean sauce -- I've heard of Chinese black bean sauce, is this what you use?


Exactly. We have a good size Asian market in the next town and I can find product that the regular market does not even carry.


i would not have a problem cleaning my plate with any of the food you've shown on this thread.


Thank you, hopefully you get inspired to cook more and different things.



posted on Jan, 25 2015 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: QuailSeed

What type of red pepper do you use for the coulis?


Bell pepper, the wife prefers the sweeter flavor, which I then roast and sauté with shallot, garlic and chicken stock.


That homemade tarragon tartar sauce sounds good, do you grow your own herbs?


Yes, I have a fairly decent size herb garden and I also bring ins some for the winter so I can use them year round.


I love Hellman's mayo, but you probably make your own from scratch.


Actually, I use the Japanese mayo because I like the flavor.


Snap peas with black bean sauce -- I've heard of Chinese black bean sauce, is this what you use?


Exactly. We have a good size Asian market in the next town and I can find product that the regular market does not even carry.


i would not have a problem cleaning my plate with any of the food you've shown on this thread.


Thank you, hopefully you get inspired to cook more and different things.


Again thank you for taking the time to answer my questions. That red bell pepper coulis sounds very tasty.

How wonderful to have a real herb garden. I've tried to grow little indoor pots of them in the past, but not with much luck. I have one potted basil plant hanging on to life.

Japanese mayo? I'm going to have to try that.

I looked online at the Chinese Black Bean sauces -- there are different brands. Do you have a favorite brand?

I've been told to be wary of any food products made in China. In fact, if one has to have an authentic Chinese food product, it's best to look for things made in Hong Kong (former British colony), Taiwan or Singapore. What do you think of that advice? Are they right?

I'm certainly having my knowledge of food expanded. Thank you.



posted on Jan, 25 2015 @ 01:33 PM
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originally posted by: QuailSeed
Again thank you for taking the time to answer my questions. That red bell pepper coulis sounds very tasty.


No problem, and it was.


Japanese mayo? I'm going to have to try that.


It's a bit creamier than standard mayo and closer to restaurant grade mayo. If you have ever had a spicy tuna roll that is what is in there along with Siracha.


I looked online at the Chinese Black Bean sauces -- there are different brands. Do you have a favorite brand?

I've been told to be wary of any food products made in China. In fact, if one has to have an authentic Chinese food product, it's best to look for things made in Hong Kong (former British colony), Taiwan or Singapore. What do you think of that advice? Are they right?


I avoid buying anything from China, food or otherwise. The bean paste is actually Korean since I like the flavor better but I cannot read the brand as it is not in English.



posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 03:19 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: QuailSeed
Again thank you for taking the time to answer my questions. That red bell pepper coulis sounds very tasty.


No problem, and it was.


Japanese mayo? I'm going to have to try that.


It's a bit creamier than standard mayo and closer to restaurant grade mayo. If you have ever had a spicy tuna roll that is what is in there along with Siracha.


I looked online at the Chinese Black Bean sauces -- there are different brands. Do you have a favorite brand?

I've been told to be wary of any food products made in China. In fact, if one has to have an authentic Chinese food product, it's best to look for things made in Hong Kong (former British colony), Taiwan or Singapore. What do you think of that advice? Are they right?


I avoid buying anything from China, food or otherwise. The bean paste is actually Korean since I like the flavor better but I cannot read the brand as it is not in English.



You're about to be hit by that storm. Hope you're prepped!

I've had tuna roll before, but using a different recipe (no mayo or Siracha, although that sounds good now that you mention it). The only time I've had tuna roll the tuna was diced and mixed in with wasabi, an extra dark soy sauce, and some type of micro green -- served in a rolled cone of black seaweed "paper." Tasted good.

I do know where a Japanese grocery store is. It will require a special trip though. Now I'm curious about the Japanese mayo.

Korean Black Bean sauce -- I'm not anywhere near a Korean grocery, but I know a farmer's market that has a large Korean food section.

Hope you don't lose power. Keep warm!



posted on Jan, 26 2015 @ 03:36 PM
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originally posted by: QuailSeed

I've had tuna roll before, but using a different recipe (no mayo or Siracha, although that sounds good now that you mention it).


You would need to request a spicy tuna roll.


Hope you don't lose power. Keep warm!


Thanks, the generator is on standby and the snow blower is gassed up.



posted on Jan, 27 2015 @ 11:56 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: QuailSeed

I've had tuna roll before, but using a different recipe (no mayo or Siracha, although that sounds good now that you mention it).


You would need to request a spicy tuna roll.


Hope you don't lose power. Keep warm!


Thanks, the generator is on standby and the snow blower is gassed up.


So glad NYC dodged the bullet. Like NYC needs another major natural disaster.

I think the authorities were right to demand people get off the streets to hunker down in warm shelters or their own homes. If their predictions had been right, it would have been a nasty frozen mess out there. Looks like Boston is getting the beating.

Okay, I'll remember that next time -- spicy tuna roll.



posted on Jan, 31 2015 @ 05:44 PM
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Tonight I made a tuna tartar appetizer similar to what you would find in a spicy tuna roll but with some additional seasoning:



And for dinner we had malloreddus, which the regional pasta of Sardinia, with the bottarga sauce recipe a few posts above:




posted on Feb, 1 2015 @ 07:29 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

the tartar looks delicious.

we are putting in an order for some sushi grade swordfish. We will place the order monday, and as soon as they catch a fish that fits the bill, it'll ship.

ETA: its early...i meant blue marlin, not swordfish.
edit on 2/1/2015 by bigfatfurrytexan because: (no reason given)




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