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Some Ebola experts worry virus may spread more easily than assumed

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posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 07:02 AM
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Yeah, well we worry abouyt that too. Viruses are unpredictable. This story is just to show that there are many sides and facets to this. We know less about this virus than many claim to.

I do believe it can be controlled, but that certainly is not evident in the way they are flying this around the world, both intentionally and unintentionally.

We don't know how long it's contagious/infectious. We don't have a handle on how long until symptoms appear. We really don't even have good numbers on whether it can be carried by an asymptomatic or cured/recovered person. Not from all I've read and heard and seen (and that's a lot).

Anyone who speaks with certainty on any of these issues, is blowing smoke. My opinion.


"At this point there is zero risk of transmission on the flight," Dr. Thomas Frieden, director of the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said after a Liberian man who flew through airports in Brussels and Washington was diagnosed with the disease last week in Dallas.

Three more people have been hospitalized in Madrid for possible exposure to the Ebola virus after a Spanish nurse tested positive for the virus.

Other public health officials have voiced similar assurances, saying Ebola is spread only through physical contact with a symptomatic individual or their bodily fluids. "Ebola is not transmitted by the air. It is not an airborne infection," said Dr. Edward Goodman of Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, where the Liberian patient remains in critical condition.

Yet some scientists who have long studied Ebola say such assurances are premature — and they are concerned about what is not known about the strain now on the loose. It is an Ebola outbreak like none seen before, jumping from the bush to urban areas, giving the virus more opportunities to evolve as it passes through multiple human hosts.

[Source]


Logical. Common sense.


"I see the reasons to dampen down public fears," Russell said. "But scientifically, we're in the middle of the first experiment of multiple, serial passages of Ebola virus in man.... God knows what this virus is going to look like. I don't."


He doesn't, and neither do we. Full stop.
edit on 10/8/2014 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 07:04 AM
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I think a test of this are those poor people who were forced to stay in the Ebola apartment in Dallas. How many of them will come down with Ebola, will one or some of them actually not catch it, etc.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 07:07 AM
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a reply to: Aleister

Even that won't prove a thing. It's situational and individual.

And the reason many feel there is more unknown than known about this virus is the same reason there is no cure and no vaccine...not enough test subjects, statistically speaking.

But you're right. What happens to the people in Dallas will tell us more.
edit on 10/8/2014 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)


+3 more 
posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 07:12 AM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity
A little glimmer of light in the blue pill miasma. Thanks for vetting.

The media is busy. They tell us this iSIS is going to kill everyone.

Then they tell us this Ebola won't kill anyone.

It won't come here. (Its here)

We can control it. (I thought it wasn't here)

It will burn itself out. (Tell Africa that)



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 07:15 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: ~Lucidity
A little glimmer of light in the blue pill miasma. Thanks for vetting.

The media is busy. They tell us this iSIS is going to kill everyone.

Then they tell us this Ebola won't kill anyone.

It won't come here. (Its here)

We can control it. (I thought it wasn't here)

It will burn itself out. (Tell Africa that)

Well Done!
That pretty much covers it. Star!



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 07:18 AM
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a reply to: intrptr
The media and goverment can't just say, we don't know.

I'm just glad to see (here in this article and here on ATS) that there are people who can put aside profit and ego long enough to say that.

We can be honest about it without fear mongering. But we should also be making smarter decisions to minimize the risk of the things we don't know.

ETA: How about this combination?


Ridiculous much?

edit on 10/8/2014 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 07:26 AM
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originally posted by: ~Lucidity
a reply to: intrptr
The media and goverment can't just say, we don't know.

I'm just glad to see (here in this article and here on ATS) that there are people who can put aside profit and ego long enough to say that.

We can be honest about it without fear mongering. But we should also be making smarter decisions to minimize the risk of the things we don't know.

ETA: How about this combination?


Ridiculous much?


Actually they can. They really don't know.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 07:30 AM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity

Excellent summary. F&S&


..Too bad MSF got gagged - they've been on the front lines since January (before the 'confirmation' got out) and likely could tell us a wholehelluva lot if the blowback wasn't so dangerous. But check out this report from NPR.


Firestone Did What Governments Have Not: Stopped Ebola In Its Tracks

Harbel is a company town ....a community of 80,000 people across the (rubber) plantation.

Firestone detected its first Ebola case on March 30, when an employee's wife arrived from northern Liberia. She'd been caring for a disease-stricken woman and was herself diagnosed with the disease. Since then Firestone has done a remarkable job of keeping the virus at bay. It built its own treatment center and set up a comprehensive response that's managed to quickly stop transmission. Dr. Brendan Flannery, the head of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's team in Liberia, has hailed Firestone's efforts as resourceful, innovative and effective.

Currently the only Ebola cases on the sprawling, 185-square-mile plantation are in patients who come from neighboring towns.

….When the Ebola case was diagnosed, "we went in to crisis mode," recalls Ed Garcia, the managing director of Firestone Liberia. He redirected his entire management structure toward Ebola.

....The case was detected on a Sunday. Garcia and a medical team from the company hospital spent Monday setting up an Ebola ward. Tuesday the woman was placed in isolation.

"None of us had any Ebola experience," he says. They scoured the Internet for information about how to treat Ebola. They cleared out a building on the hospital grounds and set up an isolation ward. They grabbed a bunch of hazmat suits for dealing with chemical spills at the rubber factory and gave them to the hospital staff. The suits worked just as well for Ebola cases.

Firestone immediately quarantined the woman's family. Like so many Ebola patients, she died soon after being admitted to the ward. But no one else at Firestone got infected: not her family and not the workers who transported, treated and cared for her.

The Firestone managers had the benefit of backing and resources of a major corporation — something the communities around them did not.

….Dr. Flannery of the CDC says a key reason for Firestone's success is the close monitoring of people who have potentially been exposed to the virus — and the moving of anyone who has had contact with an Ebola patient into voluntary quarantine.

By most accounts, this Ebola outbreak remains out of control, with health care workers across West Africa struggling to contain it.

Asked what's needed to turn that around, Flannery says, "More Firestones" — places that have the money, resources and unwavering determination to stop Ebola.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 07:50 AM
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a reply to: soficrow


Asked what's needed to turn that around, Flannery says, "More Firestones" — places that have the money, resources and unwavering determination to stop Ebola.

There it is. A corporation in its self interest has that money and resources to swing into action, right there on the scene.

Chemical suits, a company hospital and their rubber tree plant profits.

Meanwhile outside the fence, droves of people die because they don't work there. Now, if only the world could realize that masses of people are more Important than masses of rubber trees.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 07:52 AM
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Here is something that I saw come up, apparently it is from October 3rd.
Red Flag News

White House, senior administration officials hold a briefing on the U.S. government’s response to the Ebola epidemic.
At the end of the briefing not knowing his microphone is switched on, Major Garrett can be heard saying to two other White House officials, “We are screwed!”
He then goes on to say… “I am feeling a little fluey, give me kiss.”
The other official pushes him away jokingly and the female official says… “If the DC result shows positive this could go off the grid.”



There is a YouTube video at the link.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 08:02 AM
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Now the long-time experts (not the recent "experts") are saying that Ebola is so intelligent, adaptive and resilient, that it can survive sewage-treatment facilities and make it's way back into the water supply. So Dallas patient Eric Duncan's 15 days of going to the bathroom before being hospitalized could be a danger? How will the officials track down that waste and quarantine it? ;-)
-cwm



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 08:03 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

If thats true, someone should thread it.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 08:05 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: butcherguy

If thats true, someone should thread it.


Run with it.
I don't have time, I am at work.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 08:07 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Yes.

[sigh]



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 08:28 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

I fear monger too much already. Thanks, though. Soficrow?



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 08:33 AM
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originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: butcherguy

I fear monger too much already. Thanks, though. Soficrow?

I didn't write that, but the fearmongering aspect bothered me a bit too.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 08:35 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

originally posted by: intrptr
a reply to: butcherguy

I fear monger too much already. Thanks, though. Soficrow?


Sorry, no - Major Garret is not an "expert" - just a CBS talking head. Not that I'm not inclined to agree with him....


Major Elliott Garrett (born August 24, 1962 in San Diego, California) is Chief White House Correspondent with CBS News and Correspondent at Large with the National Journal.[1] Major is his proper name, not indicating a military rank. Prior to joining the National Journal he was the senior White House correspondent for the Fox News Channel. He covered the 2004 presidential election, the War on Terror, and the 2008 presidential election where he covered the Democratic primaries and later Barack Obama as the Democratic nominee.



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity


I hate Anderson Cooper. The liar that makes fake news broadcasts.

Remember this?

edit on 8-10-2014 by intrptr because: added YouTube



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 08:49 AM
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a reply to: soficrow


Sorry, no - Major Garret is not an "expert" - just a CBS talking head.

Swell, supposedly its a "hot mic" thing, though. Not a regular broad cast(?)



posted on Oct, 8 2014 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: ~Lucidity

He is right, but the only reason that he is stating that is because the air traffic has not been restricted the way it should, specially when is people that is flying from infected nations where ebola is considered ground zero

But if countries quarantine that people once identified it will be easier to control the spreading of the virus.



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